• CMU's Heinz College Named 

    Top Analytics Program by INFORMS


    Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College has been awarded the prestigious UPS George D. Smith Prize by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®), the leading association for professionals in advanced analytics and operations research. The announcement was made April 10 at the 2016 INFORMS Conference on Business Analytics & Operations Research in Orlando.

    “INFORMS has a long and rich tradition of honoring the very best in operations research and analytics through an array of awards, conferences and publications,” said Melissa Moore, INFORMS executive director. “The Smith Prize is a key part of those awards. We congratulate Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College for winning the 2016 Smith Prize.”

    “We are proud of the work this year’s INFORMS George D. Smith Prize recipient, Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, is doing to develop the next generation of operations research and analytics practitioners,” said Chuck Holland, UPS vice president of engineering. “At a time when world leaders are struggling to find answers to complex problems – global trade, emerging markets, poverty, and hunger among many others, Operations Research is a discipline they should turn to for solutions. These O.R. and analytics students are the key to a better future. We congratulate the Heinz College for winning the 2016 UPS George D. Sm...]]>

    CMU's Heinz College Named Top Analytics Program by INFORMS

    Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College has been awarded the prestigious UPS George D. Smith Prize by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®), the leading association for professionals in advanced analytics and operations research. The announcement was made April 10 at the 2016 INFORMS Conference on Business Analytics & Operations Research in Orlando.

    “INFORMS has a long and rich tradition of honoring the very best in operations research and analytics through an array of awards, conferences and publications,” said Melissa Moore, INFORMS executive director. “The Smith Prize is a key part of those awards. We congratulate Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College for winning the 2016 Smith Prize.”

    “We are proud of the work this year’s INFORMS George D. Smith Prize recipient, Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, is doing to develop the next generation of operations research and analytics practitioners,” said Chuck Holland, UPS vice president of engineering. “At a time when world leaders are struggling to find answers to complex problems – global trade, emerging markets, poverty, and hunger among many others, Operations Research is a discipline they should turn to for solutions. These O.R. and analytics students are the key to a better future. We congratulate the Heinz College fo... ]]>

  • Honoring Al Blumstein's 

    Contributions to Public Policy


    Starting April 1, H. John Heinz III College will host a two-day symposium in honor of Alfred Blumstein, J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research. Featuring expert panelists and sessions on a variety of topics at the intersection of policy and analytics, the symposium will celebrate Blumstein’s lifelong contributions to intelligent public policy in criminology and operations research.

    Former colleagues, students, and friends will come from all over the globe to pay tribute to the man whose 50 years of research into violence, criminal careers, and public policy formed the gold standard quality research in the field.

    “Al has never felt constrained to approach things the way conventional wisdom dictates,” said Daniel Nagin, Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics, a 2014 recipient of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology, and Blumstein’s former Ph.D. advisee. “He’s always done things on his own terms, looking beyond standard ways of thinking about social problems, which is something I greatly admire him for.”

    Al Blumstein SmilingIn the 1960s and 70s, that meant pioneering the use of mathematical models as tools for studying crime, innovating an area of study that, up until that point, had been firmly rooted in sociology. By approaching criminology in a way that reflected his background in engineering and operations research, Blumstein was able to bring to the field an unpre...]]>

    Honoring Al Blumstein's Contributions to Public Policy

    Starting April 1, H. John Heinz III College will host a two-day symposium in honor of Alfred Blumstein, J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research. Featuring expert panelists and sessions on a variety of topics at the intersection of policy and analytics, the symposium will celebrate Blumstein’s lifelong contributions to intelligent public policy in criminology and operations research.

    Former colleagues, students, and friends will come from all over the globe to pay tribute to the man whose 50 years of research into violence, criminal careers, and public policy formed the gold standard quality research in the field.

    “Al has never felt constrained to approach things the way conventional wisdom dictates,” said Daniel Nagin, Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics, a 2014 recipient of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology, and Blumstein’s former Ph.D. advisee. “He’s always done things on his own terms, looking beyond standard ways of thinking about social problems, which is something I greatly admire him for.”

    Al Blumstein SmilingIn the 1960s and 70s, that meant pioneering the use of mathematical models as tools for studying crime, innovating an area of study that, up until that point, had been firmly rooted in sociology. By approaching criminology in a way that reflected his background in engineering and operations research, Blumstein was ... ]]>

  • South Australian Premier's 

    Historic CMU Visit


    This story was originally published on the CMU Australia website. It is modified and republished with permission.

    The Hon. Jay Weatherill, MP, Premier of South Australia, made a historic visit to Carnegie Mellon University’s Pittsburgh campus March 14 and 15 to see firsthand CMU’s technological innovations in autonomous vehicles, smart cities, robotics, and clean energy. He was warmly welcomed by Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh, who hosted a luncheon in the Premier’s honor at the President’s residence.

    During his first day at Carnegie Mellon, Premier Weatherill visited H. John Heinz III College. During the Premier’s time at Hamburg Hall, CMU Provost Farnam Jahanian provided him with an overview of CMU as a world-class research university. The Premier was particularly interested in CMU’s track record in being one of the top universities in the U.S. in commercializing federal research grants. He was also interested in CMU’s innovation model that has now been adopted by several U.S. universities.

    Dean Ramayya Krishnan of Heinz College and Dean Jim Garrett of the College of Engineering gave the Premier an overview of CMU’s role in the promotion of smart cities through the MetroLab Network

    South Australian Premier's Historic CMU Visit

    This story was originally published on the CMU Australia website. It is modified and republished with permission.

    The Hon. Jay Weatherill, MP, Premier of South Australia, made a historic visit to Carnegie Mellon University’s Pittsburgh campus March 14 and 15 to see firsthand CMU’s technological innovations in autonomous vehicles, smart cities, robotics, and clean energy. He was warmly welcomed by Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh, who hosted a luncheon in the Premier’s honor at the President’s residence.

    During his first day at Carnegie Mellon, Premier Weatherill visited H. John Heinz III College. During the Premier’s time at Hamburg Hall, CMU Provost Farnam Jahanian provided him with an overview of CMU as a world-class research university. The Premier was particularly interested in CMU’s track record in being one of the top universities in the U.S. in commercializing federal research grants. He was also interested in CMU’s innovation model that has now been adopted by several U.S. universities.

    Dean Ramayya Krishnan of Heinz College and Dean Jim Garrett of the College of Engineering gave the Premier an overview of CMU’s role in the promotion of smart cities through the

  • Pittsburgh Named a Finalist 

    in Smart City Challenge


    Photo by AP/Vulcan Inc.

    The City of Pittsburgh was named a finalist in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Smart City Challenge. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx made the announcement on March 12 at the annual South by Southwest Interactive Festival.

    Pittsburgh was one of seven finalists selected from a pool of 78 mid-sized U.S. cities that submitted proposals for the Challenge. The DOT will award a $40 million grant to one winning city for the development of smart city initiatives.

    Urban centers around the world have made smart city growth a fundamental element of their 21st-century development. Smart cities use digital technology and data analytics to integrate city services and develop solutions to challenges that affect the economy and quality of life in metro areas.

    The DOT selected the finalists based on their plans to create tangible tools that facilitate 12 Vision Elements that the DOT outlined to prospective cities, including urban automation; connected vehicles; intelligent, sensor-based infrastructure; and urban analytics.

    “The level of excitement and energy the Smart City Challenge has created around the country far exceeded our expectations,” said Secretary Foxx. “After an overwhelming response – 78 applications total – we chose to select seven finalists instead of five because of their outstanding potential to transform the futu...]]>

    Pittsburgh Named a Finalist in Smart City Challenge

    Photo by AP/Vulcan Inc.

    The City of Pittsburgh was named a finalist in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Smart City Challenge. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx made the announcement on March 12 at the annual South by Southwest Interactive Festival.

    Pittsburgh was one of seven finalists selected from a pool of 78 mid-sized U.S. cities that submitted proposals for the Challenge. The DOT will award a $40 million grant to one winning city for the development of smart city initiatives.

    Urban centers around the world have made smart city growth a fundamental element of their 21st-century development. Smart cities use digital technology and data analytics to integrate city services and develop solutions to challenges that affect the economy and quality of life in metro areas.

    The DOT selected the finalists based on their plans to create tangible tools that facilitate 12 Vision Elements that the DOT outlined to prospective cities, including urban automation; connected vehicles; intelligent, sensor-based infrastructure; and urban analytics.

    “The level of excitement and energy the Smart City Challenge has created around the country far exceeded our expectations,” said Secretary Foxx. “After an overwhelming response – 78 applications total – we chose to select seven finalists instead of five because of their outstand... ]]>