• Heinz Students Unveil 

    Productivity Findings at White House


    In 2012, Robert J. Gordon, a prominent economist at Northwestern University, argued in his paper Is U.S. Economic Growth Over? Faltering Innovation Confronts the Six Headwinds that there are no new technological advances on the horizon that are comparable to the rise of computer technology from the 1960s to today. Gordon postulated that, as a result of this lack of technological advancement, labor productivity growth would experience a continual slowdown over the next 100 years until it reaches levels not seen since the 1800s. This would signal an almost complete halt to American productivity, which would then lead to extensive economic implications.

    But is the future of U.S. productivity so bleak? A team of Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College students went to the White House to prove otherwise.

    Lee Branstetter, Heinz College professor of Economics and Public Policy, initiated the research endeavor upon being contacted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Branstetter helped assemble a capstone project with a team of Master of Science in Public Policy and Management students dedicated to determining if the productivity outlook was as bad as it seemed.

    “Even before the global financial crisis hit, productivity growth took a dive,” said Branstetter.  “This is a big deal, since the most important engine for growth can be productivity.

    “Productivity affects incomes and living standards, and the implications are stark if it doesn’t come back.”

    The capstone project, “It’s Not Over Yet: A...]]>

    Heinz Students Unveil Productivity Findings at White House

    In 2012, Robert J. Gordon, a prominent economist at Northwestern University, argued in his paper Is U.S. Economic Growth Over? Faltering Innovation Confronts the Six Headwinds that there are no new technological advances on the horizon that are comparable to the rise of computer technology from the 1960s to today. Gordon postulated that, as a result of this lack of technological advancement, labor productivity growth would experience a continual slowdown over the next 100 years until it reaches levels not seen since the 1800s. This would signal an almost complete halt to American productivity, which would then lead to extensive economic implications.

    But is the future of U.S. productivity so bleak? A team of Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College students went to the White House to prove otherwise.

    Lee Branstetter, Heinz College professor of Economics and Public Policy, initiated the research endeavor upon being contacted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Branstetter helped assemble a capstone project with a team of Master of Science in Public Policy and Management students dedicated to determining if the productivity outlook was as bad as it seemed.

    “Even before the global financial crisis hit, productivity growth took a dive,” said Branstetter.  “This is a big deal, since the most important engine for growth can be productivity.

    “Productivity affects incomes and living standards, and the implications are stark if it doesn’t come back.”

    The capstone project... ]]>

  • General David Fridovich Talks 

    About Leadership


    No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.”

    - Andrew Carnegie

    Becoming an effective leader is one of the primary goals for anyone looking to create lasting change in their lives both personally and professionally. In order to provide insight on leadership, Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College invited retired Lieutenant General and Green Beret David P. Fridovich to speak with students as part of Heinz College’s ongoing Leadership Lecture Series.

    His talk focused on his path to becoming a 3-star General as well as how to build trust, loyalty, and confidence while staying true to oneself as a leader. Fridovich was the senior Green Beret as well as Deputy Commander of the U.S. Military's Special Operations Command when he retired on November 14, 2011 after more than 37 years of service in the U.S. Army.

    GenSpeaking

    “If you’ve got a sense of values that you deeply believe in, you have to act on them,” said Fridovich to a packed auditorium.  “This is the time as a graduate or undergraduate to get into what is important to you because that is going to be tested as you go out there.

    “The set of core values that you bring are the ones that are going to guide you.”

    Fridovich elaborated where his leadership principles come from through professional and personal anecdotes and took the time to answer questions from Heinz students.  Wit...]]>

    General David Fridovich Talks About Leadership

    No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.”

    - Andrew Carnegie

    Becoming an effective leader is one of the primary goals for anyone looking to create lasting change in their lives both personally and professionally. In order to provide insight on leadership, Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College invited retired Lieutenant General and Green Beret David P. Fridovich to speak with students as part of Heinz College’s ongoing Leadership Lecture Series.

    His talk focused on his path to becoming a 3-star General as well as how to build trust, loyalty, and confidence while staying true to oneself as a leader. Fridovich was the senior Green Beret as well as Deputy Commander of the U.S. Military's Special Operations Command when he retired on November 14, 2011 after more than 37 years of service in the U.S. Army.

    GenSpeaking

    “If you’ve got a sense of values that you deeply believe in, you have to act on them,” said Fridovich to a packed auditorium.  “This is the time as a graduate or undergraduate to get into what is important to you because that is going to be tested as you go out there.

    “The set of core values that you bring are the ones that are going to guide you.”

    Fridovich elaborated where his leadership principles come from through professional and personal anecdotes and took the time to answer quest... ]]>

  • Jonathan Caulkins Elected To 

    the National Academy of Engineers


    This article originally appeared on CMU.edu.


    Jonathan Caulkins, the H. Guyford Stever Professor of Operations Research and Public Policy at the H. John Heinz III College, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest professional distinctions an engineer can receive.

    Caulkins has been cited "for seminal contributions to the analysis, modeling and engineering of drug policy in the United States and abroad." With his election, CMU has been home to 50 NAE members.

    "We are extremely proud of Jonathan Caulkins and his election to the National Academy of Engineering," said Heinz College Dean Ramayya Krishnan. "Jon's work has been a shining example of the quality, in-depth research on societal problems we devote ourselves to here at Heinz College."

    Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to the "pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."


    Jonathan Caulkins Elected To the National Academy of Engineers

    This article originally appeared on CMU.edu.


    Jonathan Caulkins, the H. Guyford Stever Professor of Operations Research and Public Policy at the H. John Heinz III College, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest professional distinctions an engineer can receive.

    Caulkins has been cited "for seminal contributions to the analysis, modeling and engineering of drug policy in the United States and abroad." With his election, CMU has been home to 50 NAE members.

    "We are extremely proud of Jonathan Caulkins and his election to the National Academy of Engineering," said Heinz College Dean Ramayya Krishnan. "Jon's work has been a shining example of the quality, in-depth research on societal problems we devote ourselves to here at Heinz College."

    Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to the "pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches ... ]]>

  • The Future of 

    Women in Transportation



    Zoe Levenson (Master of Information Systems and Management ’15) has always been interested in urban planning and the world of transportation.  With the ever-increasing infusion of technology and innovation, the transportation industry is undergoing a complete transformation. The issues that come with rapid transformation like this require future leaders with a vested interest in the technology and analytical skills needed to solve them. 

    Levenson endeavors to be one of those future leaders, which is why she was selected to be this year’s recipient of the Women in Transportation Fellowship.

    “The Women in Transportation Fellowship is an opportunity for a student like Zoe to gain systemic exposure to the industry,” said Traffic21 Program Director Courtney Ehrlichman.  “From research, funding, politics, she sees how Traffic21 partners with real world agencies and organizations to get the technology out of the university and onto our streets.”

    Levenson has already taken great strides toward earning her WIT fellowship.  She is building a database for T-Set, the National USDOT University Transportation Center for Safety, she is conducting research with Dr. Sean Qian and the T-SET UTC Mobility Analytics Center, and she is even forming a Transportation Club on campus with a group of other students.

    “So far we have set a vision for the club, tried out a few event types, and are beginning to develop programming for the spring to bring awareness to the campus student body about the breadth and width of the transportation industry,” added Levenson.

    ...]]>

    The Future of Women in Transportation


    Zoe Levenson (Master of Information Systems and Management ’15) has always been interested in urban planning and the world of transportation.  With the ever-increasing infusion of technology and innovation, the transportation industry is undergoing a complete transformation. The issues that come with rapid transformation like this require future leaders with a vested interest in the technology and analytical skills needed to solve them. 

    Levenson endeavors to be one of those future leaders, which is why she was selected to be this year’s recipient of the Women in Transportation Fellowship.

    “The Women in Transportation Fellowship is an opportunity for a student like Zoe to gain systemic exposure to the industry,” said Traffic21 Program Director Courtney Ehrlichman.  “From research, funding, politics, she sees how Traffic21 partners with real world agencies and organizations to get the technology out of the university and onto our streets.”

    Levenson has already taken great strides toward earning her WIT fellowship.  She is building a database for T-Set, the National USDOT University Transportation Center for Safety, she is conducting research with Dr. Sean Qian and the T-SET UTC Mobility Analytics Center, and she is even forming a Transportation Club on campus with a group of other students.

    “So far we have set a vision for the club, tried out a few event types, and are beginning to develop programming for the spring to bring awareness to the campus student body about the breadth and width of the transportation industry... ]]>