Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College From the Steel City to the Desert: Pittsburgh Arts Managers and Artists Embark Upon Summer Residency Program in Sedonahttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3857Image associated with news releaseCarnegie Mellon Master of Arts Management Alumni/Radiant Hall Artists to Serve as Cultural Managers/Artists in Residence at the Inaugural Sedona Summer Colony

]]><p> <em>Carnegie Mellon Master of Arts Management Alumni/Radiant Hall Artists to Serve as Cultural Managers/Artists in Residence at the Inaugural Sedona Summer Colony</em></p> <p> SEDONA, ARIZ.&mdash; In partnership with the <a href="http://www.sedonaartscenter.org/" target="_blank">Sedona Arts Center</a> and <a href="http://vvsaz.org/" target="_blank">Verde Valley School</a>, Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/arts-management-mam/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Arts Management (MAM)</a> program and Pittsburgh&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.radianthall.com/">Radiant Hall Studios</a> are fostering a valuable professional development opportunity for arts managers and practicing artists alike.</p> <p> A group of MAM alumni and Radiant Hall artists will participate in the inaugural <a href="http://us11.campaign-archive1.com/?u=b896db504a132266b8a607599&amp;id=d75db1e5f3">Sedona Summer Colony</a> for cultural managers and artists, respectively, in the stunning red rocks and high desert of Northern Arizona. Although hundreds of artist-centered residency programs exist globally, most do not offer programs specifically designed for cultural managers as well.</p> <p> &ldquo;We want to build a haven for cultural managers &mdash; a place to get away from the normal world, develop their professional strategic vision, connect with other creative people from around the country, and utilize their managerial expertise to contribute&nbsp;something&nbsp;to our small community,&rdquo;&nbsp;said Eric Holowacz, executive director of Sedona Arts Center.&nbsp;&ldquo;Recognizing that Carnegie Mellon produces some of the top arts administrators and thinkers in the world, we wanted to create something special for graduates and faculty in a truly beautiful setting in the American West.&quot;</p> <p> In a <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3838">February statement announcing the partnership</a>, Kathryn Heidemann, Assistant Dean of Arts and Entertainment Management at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a> and the <a href="http://www.cfa.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">College of Fine Arts</a> at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a>, said that cultural manager residencies can fill a critical void in the career of an arts manager.</p> <p> &ldquo;I had the privilege of completing a very rare opportunity as a cultural manager in residence at The Studios of Key West back in 2009,&rdquo; Heidemann said. &ldquo;And this transformative experience propelled me to make some significant changes in my own career path as an arts manager.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p> It was there that Heidemann met Holowacz (who then had the role of The Studios of Key West executive director) and they quickly became trusted colleagues and sources of collaborative inspiration.</p> <p> &ldquo;Kathryn was one of the first colleagues I went to, in thinking about how our small Western town might become a cultural powerhouse in the 21<sup>st</sup> century,&rdquo; Holowacz said. &ldquo;She made it easy to invite a partnership with her program at Carnegie Mellon, and develop a project that might benefit alumni and bring diverse Cultural Managers in Residence to our summer experiment in Sedona.&rdquo;&nbsp;<img align="" alt="Sedona" src="image.aspx?id=10124" style="width: 70%; float: right;" /></p> <p> The Sedona Summer Colony opportunity also aligns with Radiant Hall&rsquo;s broader goals, which include offering professional development opportunities for Pittsburgh artists and fostering community through shared working environments.</p> <p> &ldquo;This is a unique opportunity that has the potential to change an artist&rsquo;s trajectory,&rdquo; said Ryan Lammie, Executive Director of Radiant Hall Studios, and a practicing painter and sculptor. &ldquo;It can also expand their network in unexpected ways, sparking new connections and collaborations.&rdquo;</p> <p> Sedona Summer Colony Residencies will include a free room and free meals on the beautiful, 300-acre campus of Verde Valley School. Surrounded by Sedona&rsquo;s iconic red rock landscape, participants will have access to a unique riparian ecosystem and high-desert landscapes within the Coconino National Forest, Sinaguan ruins and Native American cultures, and established cultural institutions such as Northern Arizona museums, film festivals, presenters, and theatre companies. The&nbsp;Sedona Summer Colony will take place between June 19 and August 10, and residencies can range from one to eight weeks.</p> <p> <strong>The following MAM alumni and Radiant Hall artists will be participating in the 2016 Sedona Summer Colony:</strong></p> <p> <strong><u>CMU Master of Arts Management Alumni (Cultural Managers in Residence):</u></strong></p> <p> <strong>Kim Larkin </strong><br /> Larkin graduated from the MAM program in 2008.&nbsp; She currently resides in Phoneix, where she is the Owner and Principal of MXD Arts, an arts and management consulting firm.</p> <p> <strong>Susan McIntyre</strong><br /> McIntyre graduated from the MAM program in 2003. She currently resides in Dallas, where she serves as the Major Gifts Officer for the Dallas Opera.</p> <p> <strong>Liz McFarlin-Marciak </strong><br /> McFarlin-Marciak graduated from the MAM program in 2012. She is the Assistant Director of Development Gift Strategy and W.L. Mellon Society Gift Officer for Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Tepper School of Business.</p> <p> <strong>Katy Peace</strong><br /> Peace graduated from the MAM program in 2012. She currently resides in St. Louis, where she serves as the Marketing and Digital Media Manager for Forest Park Forever. She is also the Founder and Lead Organizer for Community Supported Art &ndash; St. Louis.</p> <p> <strong><u>Radiant Hall Artists (Artists in Residence):</u></strong></p> <p> <strong>Seth Clark </strong><br /> Seth Clark is a Pittsburgh-based artist and designer. Abandoned and collapsing architecture has served as a central focus of his work for over four years. He earned his BFA in Graphic Design in 2008 from the Rhode Island School of Design.</p> <p> <strong>Rebecca Harmon</strong><br /> Rebecca Harmon graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2012 with a sculpture concentrated Bachelor of Fine Arts. Her sculpture work largely explores memory and place through found objects and textile forms. Her prints focus on our connection to the natural world.</p> <p> <strong>Bob Kubiak</strong><br /> Bob Kubiak is a fine art photographer. He primarily utilizes low-fidelity equipment, such as plastic-lensed toy cameras or pinhole&nbsp;cameras, to produce the images in all of his conceptual photographic series. Bob holds a degree in&nbsp;Mathematics from Carnegie Mellon University.</p> <p> <strong>Ryan Lammie</strong><br /> Ryan Lammie is the founder and executive director of Radiant Hall Studios. A sculptural painter, Lammie uses found objects, industrial materials, and domestic waste as source material for creating multi-dimensional monochromatic light-driven work.</p> <p> <strong>Elizabeth Rose</strong><br /> Elizabeth Claire Rose earned her BA cum laude in Fine Art with a minor in Wilderness Studies from the University of Montana. She employs traditional methods of printmaking and photographic processes to create works on paper, illustrations, installations, and public art.</p> <p> <strong>Sarah Shotland</strong><br /> Sarah Shotland is the author of the novel&nbsp;<em>Junkette</em> (White Gorilla Press, 2014) and co-editor of the literary anthology&nbsp;Words without Walls: Writers on Addiction, Violence and Incarceration&nbsp;(Trinity University Press, 2015). An author and playwright, Shotland teaches in the MFA program at Chatham University.</p> <p> <strong>Blaine Siegel</strong><br /> Siegel works across diverse mediums and disciplines, including set design and socially engaged projects. By using cast off materials and images of mass production and mass culture, Siegel attempts to resist the systems that create them, endanger the natural world and destroy people. This contradiction enables his work to hold both humor and the pathos of our contemporary plight.</p> <p> <strong><u>Other Pittsburgh Artists (Artists in Residence):</u></strong></p> <p> <strong>Anqwenique</strong><br /> Anqwenique Wingfield is an extremely versatile vocalist and teaching artist specializing in opera, classical music, jazz and soul. In 2011 she was chosen as a resident artist of JAZZSPACE, an organization that aims to support emerging jazz artists in Pittsburgh. She graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Voice Performance.</p> <p> <strong>D.S. Kinsel</strong><br /> D.S. Kinsel is a self-described &ldquo;black creative entrepreneur and cultural agitator,&rdquo; whose mediums for creative expression include painting, window display, installation, curating, action-painting, non-traditional performance, and social media. A Pittsburgh-based arts administrator and the co-founder of BOOM Concepts, Kinsel&#39;s work is a reflection of his race, culture, and generation. He strives to encourage audiences to reevaluate their ideas of fine art.</p> <p> ###</p> <p> <strong>About the MAM Program: </strong>Offered through a joint partnership between the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/">Heinz College</a> and the <a href="http://www.cfa.cmu.edu/">College of Fine Arts</a>, the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/arts-management-mam/index.aspx">Master of Arts Management (MAM)</a> program at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/">Carnegie Mellon University</a> is designed to create innovative leaders in the visual and performing arts. The program combines rigorous finance, marketing, technology and fundraising coursework with practical experience to prepare graduates to excel in public, private or nonprofit arts environments.&nbsp; The groundbreaking program boasts more than 600 graduates in 20 countries who work at some of the most prestigious arts institutions across the globe, including The Guggenheim Museum, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Carnegie Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Opera, The Smithsonian, The National Endowment for the Arts, Edinburgh Festival, Mori Art Museum, Google, and more. The MAM program also is host to two innovative initiatives including <strong><a href="http://www.futuretenant.org">Future Tenant</a></strong>, a downtown Pittsburgh gallery and performance space, and <a href="http://www.technologyinthearts.org">AMTLab</a>, a nationally recognized research center.</p> <p> <strong>About Radiant Hall Studios: </strong><a href="http://www.radianthall.com/">Radiant Hall Studios</a> is dedicated to the creation and preservation of artist studio space. It provides communal and private artist studios, professional development opportunities, and affiliate membership benefits. Founded in 2014 in the vibrant neighborhood of Lawrenceville, Radiant Hall how operates four locations throughout Pittsburgh. Radiant Hall is a registered 501c3 non-profit organization.</p> <p> <strong>About Carnegie Mellon University:</strong> Carnegie Mellon (<a href="http://www.cmu.edu/">www.cmu.edu</a>) is a private, internationally ranked research university with programs in areas ranging from science, technology and business, to public policy, the humanities and the arts. More than 12,000 students in the university&rsquo;s seven schools and colleges benefit from a small student-to-faculty ratio and an education characterized by its focus on creating and implementing solutions for real problems, interdisciplinary collaboration and innovation. A global university, Carnegie Mellon has campuses in Pittsburgh, Pa., California&rsquo;s Silicon Valley and Qatar, and programs in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe and Mexico.</p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3857Mon, 16 Jun 2016 15:46:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=0From the Steel City to the Desert: Pittsburgh Arts Managers and Artists Embark Upon Summer Residency Program in Sedona

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McKinsey Director Paul Mango Talks Leadership, Health Care with Heinz Studentshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3855Image associated with news releasePaul Mango is Director of the McKinsey & Company Pittsburgh office, where he advises leading health care organizations in improving their performance, staying at the forefront of ongoing health reforms, and attracting new customers. Heinz College recently hosted Mr. Mango as part of its Distinguished Leaders Lecture Series. Mango discussed his leadership journey with a group of Heinz College students at Hamburg Hall, sharing lessons on some of the characteristics he has observed in good leaders and has emulated in leading his own employees.

]]><p> As a kid, Paul Mango paid more attention to his curveball than he did to his schoolwork.</p> <p> A promising prep athlete, Mango had dreams of being a Major League pitcher. But when an injury derailed his baseball career, he knew he had to adjust his priorities and aspire to career goals he had never previously considered.</p> <p> &ldquo;I didn&rsquo;t really do a lot of research or studying, but the one thing I knew was that whatever field I was going into, I wanted to be part of the best organization in that field,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> That mindset led Mango to the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he embarked upon a successful military career with the U.S. Army&rsquo;s 82<sup>nd</sup> Airborne Division. It later led him to Harvard Business School, where he earned his MBA.</p> <p> And that same mindset drives Mango today in his work as Director of the <a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/" target="_blank">McKinsey &amp; Company</a> Pittsburgh office, where he advises leading health care organizations in improving their performance, staying at the forefront of ongoing health reforms, and attracting new customers.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a>&nbsp;recently hosted Mr. Mango as part of its Distinguished Leaders Lecture Series. Mango discussed his leadership journey with a group of Heinz College students at Hamburg Hall, sharing lessons on some of the characteristics he has observed in good leaders and has emulated in leading his own employees.</p> <p> For Mango, good leadership is not about being on top. It&rsquo;s about being out in front.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s not about hierarchy, and it&rsquo;s not about using authority to influence people,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s about demonstrating through example so that they want to follow you.&rdquo;</p> <p> Mango also impressed upon the students the importance of being consistent in their leadership &ndash; both in selflessly investing in their people and in displaying integrity.</p> <p> &ldquo;You can be honest and you can be ethical, but if you&rsquo;re inconsistent, if you&rsquo;re unreliable, those aren&rsquo;t mortal sins but they affect people,&rdquo; Mango said. &ldquo;There are broad sets of factors that cause someone to be viewed as a person of high integrity.&rdquo;</p> <p> Mango acknowledged that there are two types of leaders: those who dampen anxiety, and those whom amplify. He encouraged the students to strive to be leaders who calm anxiety amongst their employees.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s very unsettling in a stressful situation to have an employer who amplifies anxiety,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Leadership is not just how you act all day, but it&rsquo;s particularly how you act when you are under stress.&rdquo;</p> <p> Mango answered student questions about his work as a consultant within the ever evolving and rapidly growing health care industry. He encouraged the students to be fundamentally optimistic leaders in whatever career path they should choose.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a little bit amorphous, but the whole demeanor that you bring to a leadership role is quite important,&rdquo; Mango said. &ldquo;People do notice, and they respond very favorably to, not unrealistic optimism, but certainly optimism.&rdquo;</p> <p> The Heinz College Distinguished Leaders Lecture Series launched in 2014 to impart practical leadership advice to Heinz College students from leaders in various industries. In addition to Mr. Mango, speakers have included:</p> <p> U.S. Senator Pat Toomey</p> <p> Lieutenant General David Fridovich, U.S. Army (ret.)</p> <p> Grant Oliphant, President of <a href="http://www.heinz.org/" target="_blank">The Heinz Endowments</a></p> <p> Learn more about <a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/" target="_blank">McKinsey &amp; Company &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3855Mon, 31 May 2016 12:33:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10212McKinsey Director Paul Mango Talks Leadership, Health Care with Heinz Students

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CMU's Heinz College Named Top Analytics Program by INFORMShttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3852Image associated with news releaseCarnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College has won the prestigious UPS George D. Smith Prize by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®), the leading association for professionals in advanced analytics and operations research. The announcement was made April 10 at the 2016 INFORMS Conference on Business Analytics & Operations Research in Orlando. “INFORMS has a long and rich tradition of honoring the very best in operations research and analytics through an array of awards, conferences and publications,” said Melissa Moore, INFORMS Executive Director. “The Smith Prize is a key part of those awards. We congratulate Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College for winning the 2016 Smith Prize.” Heinz College’s unique and effective analytical education, experiential learning activities and successful collaboration between students and partner organizations for capstone projects played an important role in its winning this award.

]]><p> Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> has been awarded the prestigious <a href="http://www.informs.org/Recognize-Excellence/INFORMS-Prizes-Awards/UPS-George-D.-Smith-Prize" target="_blank">UPS George D. Smith Prize</a> by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (<a href="http://www.informs.org/" target="_blank">INFORMS</a>&reg;), the leading association for professionals in advanced analytics and operations research. The announcement was made April 10 at the 2016 INFORMS Conference on Business Analytics &amp; Operations Research in Orlando.</p> <p> &ldquo;INFORMS has a long and rich tradition of honoring the very best in operations research and analytics through an array of awards, conferences and publications,&rdquo; said Melissa Moore, INFORMS executive director. &ldquo;The Smith Prize is a key part of those awards. We congratulate Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Heinz College for winning the 2016 Smith Prize.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;We are proud of the work this year&rsquo;s INFORMS George D. Smith Prize recipient, Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, is doing to develop the next generation of operations research and analytics practitioners,&rdquo; said Chuck Holland, UPS vice president of engineering. &ldquo;At a time when world leaders are struggling to find answers to complex problems &ndash; global trade, emerging markets, poverty, and hunger among many others, Operations Research is a discipline they should turn to for solutions. These O.R. and analytics students are the key to a better future. We congratulate the Heinz College for winning the 2016 UPS George D. Smith Prize.&rdquo;</p> <p> Heinz College&rsquo;s unique and effective analytical education, experiential learning activities and successful collaboration between students and partner organizations for capstone projects played an important role in its winning this award.</p> <p> Those collaborations allow students to put skills into practice. Through experiential learning opportunities like capstone projects, internships, and apprenticeships, Heinz students help to research and develop solutions to some of society&rsquo;s most pressing challenges.</p> <p> Project partnerships include organizations across all sectors of the economy. In one, students worked with the representatives from McKinsey &amp; Company to analyze factors that lead consumers to various health insurance decisions.</p> <p> &ldquo;The students brought a set of technology and analytical skills to bear on that problem which we were unaccustomed to seeing from other academic programs,&quot; said Paul Mango, director of <a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/" target="_blank">McKinsey &amp; Company</a>. &ldquo;We have continued to engage with fantastic Heinz students through the capstone program and have recently added Heinz to the list of top schools from which we recruit our associates.&rdquo;</p> <p> Another student group worked with Pittsburgh Veterans Engineering Resource Center (<a href="http://www.pittsburgh.va.gov/verc/" target="_blank">VERC</a>). A cardiologist was concerned about the need for some echocardiograms being ordered for patients at the center for the Department of Veterans Affairs. A team of Heinz students conducted machine learning and data mining analysis to determine the percentage of echocardiograms needed to provide optimal health care.</p> <p> &ldquo;We did find out through the use of the analytics tools that the students developed that some of the testing was inappropriate,&rdquo; said Bob Monte, director of the Pittsburgh VERC. &ldquo;This is important, because if we are able to eliminate some of the inappropriate testing, we are then able to provide better access to [all] patients.&rdquo;</p> <p> Individual efforts by students also make a big impact.</p> <p> Megan John, a student in the Heinz College&rsquo;s School of Public Policy &amp; Management Washington, D.C., program, is identifying trends within data sets of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development&rsquo;s (<a href="http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD" target="_blank">HUD</a>) Real Estate Assessment Center (<a href="http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/public_indian_housing/reac" target="_blank">REAC</a>).</p> <p> &ldquo;The Carnegie Mellon effort in working specifically with analytics and the data that they have provided to us, and in the different ways of using this data, have been very important in our quest to make sure that we&rsquo;re effective HUD regulators,&rdquo; said D.J. LaVoy, deputy assistant secretary of REAC. &ldquo;The project that we&rsquo;re working on has the potential to save millions of taxpayers&rsquo; dollars.&rdquo;</p> <p> The UPS George D. Smith Prize, which includes a $10,000 cash award, is given to an academic department or program for effective and innovative preparation of students to be good practitioners of operations research. <img align="" alt="Informs Selfie" src="image.aspx?id=10184" style="margin: 10px; float: right; width: 250px; height: 323px;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;We are honored and excited to receive this prestigious award,&rdquo; said Heinz College Dean Ramayya Krishnan. &ldquo;As the School founded by William W. Cooper, a legendary operations researcher, analytic thinking, appropriate use of technology and a deep interest in societal problem solving are embedded in our DNA.&rdquo;</p> <p> INFORMS, the INFORMS College for the Practice of Management Science (<a href="http://www.informs.org/Community/CPMS" target="_blank">CPMS</a>) and <a href="http://www.ups.com/" target="_blank">UPS</a> collaborated to establish the award five years ago, which has attracted applications from highly recognized academic programs.</p> <p> &ldquo;The Heinz College program epitomizes the spirit of the UPS George D. Smith Prize, which recognizes exceptional academic programs for their effective and innovative preparation of students to be good practitioners of operations research, management science, and analytics,&rdquo; said Robin Lougee, research industry lead for consumer products, business solutions, and mathematical sciences for IBM, and chair of the George D. Smith Prize Committee. &ldquo;The program at the Heinz College is commended for its long and outstanding record of preparing students with the trifecta of theoretical knowledge, technology know-how and interpersonal skills that are necessary to successfully practice data-driven approaches to address major societal challenges.&rdquo;</p> <p> The UPS George D. Smith Prize is named in honor of the late UPS chief executive officer who was a patron of operations researchers at this leading Fortune 500 Corporation. George D. Smith was the second CEO of UPS, holding the position from 1962-1972.</p> <p> Related:</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.informs.org/Recognize-Excellence/INFORMS-Prizes-Awards/UPS-George-D.-Smith-Prize" target="_blank">UPS George D. Smith Prize</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.informs.org/" target="_blank">INFORMS</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3852Mon, 26 Apr 2016 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10183CMU's Heinz College Named | Top Analytics Program by INFORMS

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Heinz College Policy Students React to Hillary Rodham Clinton’s CMU Campaign Visithttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3851Image associated with news releaseOn April 6, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton addressed a packed crowd at Carnegie Mellon University’s Skibo Gymnasium as part of her campaign for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States. During her presentation, Secretary Clinton outlined her stance on policy issues ranging from manufacturing and marriage equality to environmental policy and gender-based pay equity. Several students from H. John Heinz III College’s School of Public Policy and Management attended the event, eager to witness the political process in action. A number of policy students who described themselves as Clinton supporters attended the rally to publicly endorse their preferred candidate. But several Heinz College students who hold opposing views to Secretary Clinton’s also attended the rally to learn more about her platform.

]]><p> On April 6, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton addressed a packed crowd at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s</a> Skibo Gymnasium as part of her campaign for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States.</p> <p> By mid-afternoon, lines of people waiting to hear the former Secretary and U.S. Senator speak shortly after 6:30 p.m. snaked down Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s Frew Street and wrapped around Margaret Morrison Street all the way to Forbes Avenue.</p> <p> As CMU students and members of the greater Pittsburgh community cleared security checkpoints and streamed into the gym, singers from CMU Soundbytes a cappella group did vocal warm-ups in anticipation of their performance of the Stevie Wonder&rsquo;s &ldquo;Higher Ground.&rdquo; Skibo&rsquo;s scoreboard displayed a time of 20:16 and showed scores of 45 for both the home and guest teams, symbolizing Clinton&rsquo;s drive to become the 45<sup>th</sup> President in November.</p> <p> During her presentation, Secretary Clinton outlined her stance on policy issues ranging from manufacturing and marriage equality to environmental policy and gender-based pay equity.</p> <p> &ldquo;We need to stand up and make sure our voices and our votes count,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p> The former Secretary also praised Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s research efforts, describing a visit she had made earlier in the day to the CMU Robotics Institute.</p> <p> &ldquo;I saw the extraordinary work they are doing in medicine, in manufacturing, in the kind of home care delivery that will be part of our future because of the work done at this great university &ndash; by the faculty, by the students,&rdquo; Secretary Clinton said.</p> <p> Several students from <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College&rsquo;s</a> School of Public Policy and Management attended the event, eager to witness the political process in action.</p> <p> Katie Whipkey, a second-year <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM)</a> student who described herself as a Clinton supporter, said that she has always enjoyed attending political rallies.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a fun environment to be in, and it&rsquo;s good to see people getting excited about voting and about democracy,&rdquo; Whipkey said.</p> <p> Whipkey was surprised that Clinton dedicated some of her speech to the issue of childcare, considering the former Secretary&rsquo;s young, student-based target audience at the rally. But Whipkey said that Clinton&rsquo;s choice of Carnegie Mellon as a site for her campaign stop gave her credibility as a candidate who is interested in the intersection of science, technology, and the arts.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was a great choice for her to come here to CMU to spur the conversation about creativity, design, and technology, and how young people with great ideas can really be the catalyst for her campaign moving forward,&rdquo; Whipkey said.</p> <p> For Whipkey, Clinton&rsquo;s emphasis on building community resonated with the members of the CMU campus who were in attendance.</p> <p> &ldquo;I really liked how the entire thing opened with the building of bridges and embracing diversity, and I thought that sold really well, especially for Carnegie Mellon and how much diversity there was in the crowd with the international student body that we have,&rdquo; Whipkey said.</p> <p> One of those international students was Camila Alarcon, a second-year MSPPM student.&nbsp; A native of Guatemala, Alarcon said she attended the rally because she values the importance that the U.S. presidential election holds in impacting foreign policy.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re so close, and Central America has such an important relationship with the United States, particularly in the area of immigration,&rdquo; Alarcon said. &ldquo;We have so many of my people come here looking for a better life. Secretary Clinton has supported immigration reform, and she&rsquo;s the only candidate who has been very vocal about it.&rdquo;</p> <p> Alarcon said she noticed a strong reaction from the live audience when Clinton spoke about gender-based wage discrimination, an issue that is also of paramount importance to Alarcon.</p> <p> &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been doing a lot of work in Carnegie Mellon either as research or working for progress regarding the importance of equal pay, so that was really something I identified with,&rdquo; Alarcon said.</p> <p> A number of policy students who described themselves as Clinton supporters attended the rally to publicly endorse their preferred candidate. But several Heinz College students who hold opposing views to Secretary Clinton&rsquo;s also attended the rally to learn more about her platform.</p> <p> James Swindell and Lauren Renaud, who self-identify as Bernie Sanders supporters, attended Secretary Clinton&rsquo;s campaign rally less than a week after also attending a rally for Senator Sanders at the Pittsburgh Convention Center.</p> <p> &ldquo;I have an interest in politics, and I had the opportunity to see Bernie Sanders last week, so I wanted to take the chance to see Hillary Clinton in person to give both candidates opportunities to have their voices heard,&rdquo; said Swindell, a second-year <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/arts-management-mam/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Arts Management (MAM)</a> student.</p> <p> Swindell said that he was impressed by some of Secretary Clinton&rsquo;s ideas that he had not previously heard expressed through media outlets.</p> <p> &ldquo;She included a remark about a $10 billon plan to create an infrastructure bank for the federal government to draw funds for major transportation projects, which I found to be quite fascinating and really interesting,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> And while he reaffirmed his decision to vote for Senator Sanders as an absentee voter in the Virginia Democratic primary, Swindell said that his impression of Secretary Clinton changed after he saw her speak in person.</p> <p> &ldquo;She was humorous,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;She made several comments that drew laughter, and she seemed very down-to-earth, something that I don&rsquo;t get from the media and something that I haven&rsquo;t perceived in the past. So that was something that was actually quite refreshing.&rdquo;</p> <p> Renaud, a first-year MSPPM student, thought that Secretary Clinton did a good job of touting CMU as an innovative research center and addressing specific inequalities within the gender pay gap among African-American and Hispanic women. But Renaud was generally unimpressed with the former Secretary&rsquo;s overall presentation.</p> <p> &ldquo;There are some things that she says that are a little generic sounding to me, or like she&rsquo;s trying to say the right thing, but it doesn&rsquo;t feel like there&rsquo;s a history of her backing those things up,&rdquo; Renaud said.</p> <p> A native of California, Renaud said that she is excited to be studying policy in a political battleground state during an election year, because her home state often gets &ldquo;glossed over&rdquo; for campaign stops like these.</p> <p> &ldquo;The nature of being in line with random strangers for several hours gets you a different perspective on how the electorate is thinking than just reading polls or articles,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;When I was standing in line for the Hillary rally, there were a bunch of high school seniors standing behind us, and we were just talking to them about policy issues and higher education, and it was just kind of interesting to talk to 17- and 18-year-olds about what is going on.&rdquo;</p> <p> Samantha Levinson, a first-year MSPPM student, had an opportunity to sit behind Secretary Clinton during her speech.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was really a fun place to be, especially given that I&rsquo;d never been to a political rally before,&rdquo; Levinson said. &ldquo;The energy was so high from the beginning, and it was an interesting and cool way to view the democratic process in a very visceral, connected way.&rdquo;</p> <p> Levinson was impressed by Clinton&rsquo;s emphasis on and strategy for distinguishing herself as a progressive candidate at the rally, something Levinson said Clinton had struggled to do during earlier stages of her presidential campaign.</p> <p> &ldquo;There was this one line where she said, &lsquo;the thing about being a progressive is that you have to make progress,&rsquo;&rdquo; Levinson recalled. &ldquo;She stressed that she really is the most qualified person in the field, and I thought that she did a great job with that.&rdquo;</p> <p> For Levinson, seeing an active presidential candidate speak at her school was exciting, and it supplemented her classroom experience as an MSPPM student.</p> <p> &ldquo;It helps remind me of what the end goal is in public life and serving the public good,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It also reminds you of how important presentation and participation are. Sometimes you forget about how visceral democracy is, and how much it is about connecting with other people, and remembering that makes me think differently about coming to school.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;As a policy student, it&rsquo;s a great way to bridge theory and practice into real-life situations,&rdquo; Alarcon added. &ldquo;Seeing how important policymaking is affects all of us as policy students, especially when it comes to looking beyond the party and beyond rhetoric to how policy will be enacted.&rdquo;</p> <p> Carnegie Mellon has been host to a variety of presidential candidates over the past few elections, including President Barack Obama and Senator John McCain. First Lady Michelle Obama also visited the Pittsburgh campus on a 2008 campaign stop.</p> <p> <em>As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation, Carnegie Mellon University does not support or oppose any particular candidate and maintains an open door policy to all candidates.</em></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the School of Public Policy and Management &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3851Mon, 14 Apr 2016 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10176Heinz College Policy Students React to Hillary Rodham Clinton’s CMU Campaign Visit

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Ben Elliott Lets His Imagination Run Wild at Warner Bros. Interactivehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3849Image associated with news release“It’s like taking all of your LEGOs and dumping them all out on the floor – anything is possible,” said Ben Elliott (MEIM ‘07) of LEGO Dimensions, the Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment (WBIE) video game that launched in September. The game combines physical LEGO bricks with a virtual video game world, featuring everyone from Gandalf to Homer Simpson teaming up to defeat the evil Lord Vortech. For Elliott, art mimics life. The onscreen collaborations that make LEGO Dimensions come alive are the result of real-life collaborations between Warner Bros. and several major entertainment studios, including Sony, Universal, and Fox. As Vice President of Business Development & Licensing at WBIE, Elliott is responsible for negotiating these partnerships. In many ways, this is the job Elliott was born to do. But it wasn’t until he enrolled in the Master of Entertainment Industry Management (MEIM) program at Carnegie Mellon University's H. John Heinz III College that all the pieces fell into place.

]]><p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s like taking all of your LEGOs and dumping them all out on the floor &ndash; anything is possible,&rdquo; said Ben Elliott (MEIM &lsquo;07) of LEGO Dimensions, the <a href="http://www.warnerbros.com/studio/divisions/home-entertainment/warner-bros-interactive-entertainment" target="_blank">Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment (WBIE)</a> video game that launched in September. The game combines physical LEGO bricks with a virtual video game world, featuring everyone from Gandalf to Homer Simpson teaming up to defeat the evil Lord Vortech.</p> <p> For Elliott, art mimics life. The onscreen collaborations that make LEGO Dimensions come alive are the result of real-life collaborations between Warner Bros. and several major entertainment studios, including Sony, Universal, and Fox. As Vice President of Business Development &amp; Licensing at WBIE, Elliott is responsible for negotiating these partnerships.</p> <p> In many ways, this is the job Elliott was born to do. But it wasn&rsquo;t until he enrolled in the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/entertainment-industry-management-meim/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Entertainment Industry Management (MEIM)</a> program at Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> that all the pieces fell into place.</p> <p> As an undergraduate Political Science major at Pepperdine University, Elliott was head of the debate team and student body president. He had planned to leverage his skills in business management and public policy towards a career in foreign affairs. After graduating from Pepperdine, he spent six months working for the <a href="http://www.state.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Department of State</a> to help promote civil society reforms in Middle East, followed by a stint at the U.S. Embassy in Tunisia. It was life-changing, but something was missing. After Tunisia, Elliott, a self-proclaimed pop culture fanatic, soon became interested in applying his skills in negotiation and management to something more creative.</p> <p> He left the world of D.C. foreign policy and was selected as one of 16 Coro Fellows at the <a href="http://www.coropittsburgh.org/" target="_blank">Coro Center for Civic Leadership in Pittsburgh</a>. While in the program, he did special projects and internships, including a stint at the Pittsburgh Film Office and working on the campaign for Bill Peduto, Pittsburgh&rsquo;s current mayor. It was during Coro that Elliott became acquainted with many students from <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">CMU</a> who were also Coro participants, and he quickly became attracted to CMU&rsquo;s collaborative community.</p> <p> &ldquo;My entire life, I&rsquo;ve been interested in pop culture, and the talent that goes into making any creative product,&rdquo; Elliott said. &ldquo;Whether it&rsquo;s TV, film, or video games, it takes a lot of people doing a lot of different things well, all at the same time. I really appreciated CMU&rsquo;s focus on consciously creating space for projects where art and technology could intersect to make these things happen.&rdquo;</p> <p> So when Heinz College introduced the MEIM program just as Elliott was completing the Coro Fellows Program, it seemed that the stars had aligned for him. The unique, dual-city MEIM program covers everything from management skills to hands-on experience within the entertainment industry.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was completely serendipitous,&rdquo; Elliott said. &ldquo;I heard about the MEIM program and I thought, &lsquo;what is this?&rsquo; It seemed exactly right &ndash; the perfect way to balance the creative part of my brain with what I do well: manage and negotiate.&rdquo;</p> <p> Throughout the two-year program, students are given plenty of opportunities to engage in hands-on learning. During the first year in Pittsburgh, students develop the business management and leadership skills necessary to excel in a constantly changing marketplace. In their second year, MEIM students move on to Los Angeles, where their practical learning experiences include classes with top industry professionals and nearly 1,000 hours of internship experience. By offering a core curriculum of quantitative management skills combined with practicum work within the field, the MEIM program positions its graduates to be leaders throughout the entertainment industry.</p> <p> As part of their curriculum, MEIM student attend the <a href="http://www.sundance.org/festivals/sundance-film-festival" target="_blank">Sundance</a> and <a href="http://www.sxsw.com/" target="_blank">SXSW</a> film festivals, building relationships and expanding their network in the process. They also participate in Internships and capstone projects with major entertainment industry clients including <a href="http://disney.com/" target="_blank">Disney</a>, <a href="http://www.warnerbros.com/" target="_blank">Warner Bros.</a>, <a href="http://twitter.com" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/us/en.html" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, <a href="http://www.pwc.com/" target="_blank">PwC</a>, <a href="http://www.fox.com/" target="_blank">Fox</a>, and <a href="http://www.imax.com/" target="_blank">IMAX</a>. This hands-on professional experience in the entertainment industry allows students to find the best working environment for them.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s really about understanding what skill set you have, and what kind of culture you want to be in,&rdquo; said Elliott, speaking of the internship experience. &ldquo;If you open you eyes to what companies are focused on &lsquo;entertainment,&rsquo; the opportunities are remarkable.&rdquo;</p> <p> In fact, Elliott&rsquo;s big break in the entertainment industry was the direct result of his second-year internship with Warner Bros. Though he originally planned to work in film development, he was instead offered an internship in video game production.</p> <p> Seven years later, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment has grown from a staff of 30 to more than 1,000 employees working for a total of six studios, and it currently boasts four of the top 10 games in the United States, including Mortal Kombat X and Batman: Arkham Knight.</p> <p> For Elliott, his love of his work still goes back to his desire for creative collaboration. A recent trip to <a href="http://www.comic-con.org/" target="_blank">Comic-Com International</a> in San Diego reminded him why he&rsquo;s found his ideal career.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was an incredible experience, seeing people dressed up as characters from our films, television shows, and games,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s incredible to realize that Warner Bros. is entertaining the world, and that I&rsquo;m a part of that process.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/entertainment-industry-management-meim/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MEIM program &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3849Mon, 06 Apr 2016 13:02:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10175Ben Elliott Lets His Imagination Run Wild at Warner Bros. Interactive

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Heinz College Grad Founds Agriculture Startup; Wins $50,000 National Science Foundation Granthttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3850Image associated with news releaseBrendan Carroll (MISM ’15) is in the process of promoting and seeking investment capital for his entrepreneurial venture, Skycision, a data-driven farm management platform built around the collection and processing of high-resolution aerial imagery obtained via drone technology. The H. John Heinz III College alumnus recently won a $50,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to help launch this innovative new firm, which leverages CMU’s core competencies in computer vision, machine learning, and robotics to revolutionize farming.

]]><p> Imagine you&rsquo;re a farmer, trying to project your crop yield for the coming season. You know how much you planted, but you don&rsquo;t know how many of those plants actually took root. And of course, you&rsquo;ll need to account for factors such as pests and weather damage that may further reduce your harvest potential. Benchmarked data from previous seasons might give you some idea about your yield, but it won&rsquo;t tell you exactly what this season has in store. Monitoring actual growth and the factors that threaten it require multiple hours spent per week scouting your many acres on foot, costing dozens of hours of time and thousands in yield should any threat go undetected.</p> <p> What if there were a quicker, more accurate way to monitor crops and detect problems early?</p> <p> Enter Brendan Carroll&rsquo;s (MISM &rsquo;15) new venture, <a href="http://www.skycision.com/" target="_blank">Skycision</a>, a data-driven farm management platform built around the collection and processing of high-resolution aerial imagery obtained via drone technology. The <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> alumnus recently won a $50,000 <a href="http://www.nsf.gov/" target="_blank">National Science Foundation (NSF)</a> grant to help launch this innovative new firm, which leverages CMU&rsquo;s core competencies in computer vision, machine learning, and robotics to revolutionize farming.</p> <p> Carroll explains that by obtaining imagery via drones, farmers will save a lot of time and money in their scouting process. Rather than spend hours of manpower walking their fields looking for problem areas, farmers can use Skycision&rsquo;s iOS app to create and deploy optimized drone flight plans to efficiently scout any region of their operation.</p> <p> Once the drone has taken photos of the fields, the app relays those images to the cloud, where it compiles an interactive map. From there, specialized imaging sensors measure crop health, optimize field-based irrigation, and generate actionable insights to the farmer.</p> <p> &ldquo;When we take pictures from above, we can pinpoint crop stress at a very early stage, and then notify the farmer to take the appropriate action,&rdquo; Carroll said. &ldquo;We can tell them where exactly issues reside and suggest how to remediate issues, saving them the time they&rsquo;d otherwise be spending walking their fields searching for those problems themselves.&rdquo;</p> <p> It&rsquo;s this combination of innovation and practicality that make Skycision so attractive, not only to farmers, but to investors. The NSF grant is the latest in a series of public and private funds that Carroll and his team have already raised, including contributions from <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">CMU</a> alumni.</p> <p> These include the <a href="http://acceleprise.vc/" target="_blank">Acceleprise</a> program, an incubator based out of San Francisco. The four-month Accelprise program focuses exclusively Software as a Service (SaaS) based startups, and contributes $50,000 in funding, office space, and ongoing mentorship to emerging entrepreneurs throughout the course of the program. The program culminates with the May 25 Demo Day, at which Carroll and his team will have an opportunity to pitch Skycision to additional prospective investors.</p> <p> &ldquo;It has been critical in helping us to more effectively understand core SaaS metrics for investors, as well how to most efficiently and effectively scale sales,&rdquo; Carroll said.</p> <p> With a growing investment base and a marketing strategy that becomes increasingly nuanced with each pitch, the Skycision team is excited about what the future holds for this innovative startup. But as Carroll explains, Skycision has evolved dramatically since he originally conceived it.</p> <p> As a Global MISM student, Carroll was initially interested in employing drones for pharmaceutical delivery. But mounting logistical and regulatory challenges soon made it clear that this concept was too risky for a new venture. So like any good businessperson, he went back to the drawing board.</p> <p> A year later, Carroll says that the skills he learned at Heinz College have been essential for building his business from the ground up. In particular, he cites the courses he took in data mining and distributed systems as giving him the skills he needed to make Skycision a reality.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re at an exciting point of growth,&rdquo; Carroll said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re growing our team and scaling sales, we&rsquo;re excelling in all the right places, and now it&rsquo;s just a matter of managing growth and delivering on expectations!&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.skycision.com/index.html" target="_blank">Learn more about Skycision &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/21-month-track/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the Global MISM program &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3850Mon, 29 Mar 2016 13:10:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10152Heinz College Grad Founds Agriculture Startup; Wins $50,000 National Science Foundation Grant

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Honoring Al Blumstein's Contributions to Public Policyhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3848Image associated with news releaseStarting April 1, H. John Heinz III College will host a two-day symposium in honor of Alfred Blumstein, J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research. Featuring expert panelists and sessions on a variety of topics at the intersection of policy and analytics, the symposium will celebrate Blumstein’s lifelong contributions to intelligent public policy in criminology and operations research. Former colleagues, students, and friends will come from all over the globe to pay tribute to the man whose 50 years of research into violence, criminal careers, and public policy formed the gold standard quality research in the field.

]]><p> Starting April 1, <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> will host a two-day symposium in honor of Alfred Blumstein, J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research. Featuring expert panelists and sessions on a variety of topics at the intersection of policy and analytics, the symposium will celebrate Blumstein&rsquo;s lifelong contributions to intelligent public policy in criminology and operations research.</p> <p> Former colleagues, students, and friends will come from all over the globe to pay tribute to the man whose 50 years of research into violence, criminal careers, and public policy formed the gold standard quality research in the field.</p> <p> &ldquo;Al has never felt constrained to approach things the way conventional wisdom dictates,&rdquo; said Daniel Nagin, Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics, a 2014 recipient of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology, and Blumstein&rsquo;s former Ph.D. advisee. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s always done things on his own terms, looking beyond standard ways of thinking about social problems, which is something I greatly admire him for.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Al Blumstein Smiling" src="image.aspx?id=10148&amp;width=300&amp;mar=1" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />In the 1960s and 70s, that meant pioneering the use of mathematical models as tools for studying crime, innovating an area of study that, up until that point, had been firmly rooted in sociology. By approaching criminology in a way that reflected his background in engineering and operations research, Blumstein was able to bring to the field an unprecedented level of robust analysis.</p> <p> &ldquo;Everyone&rsquo;s heard of the &lsquo;criminal justice system,&rsquo; and I think that&rsquo;s a term that&rsquo;s fairly attributable to Al,&rdquo; Nagin said. &ldquo;He was the first person to conceive of it as a system, and put forth a model of it as such.&rdquo;</p> <p> Over the years, Blumstein&rsquo;s work has investigated nearly every aspect of that system, including modeling of criminal careers, sentencing, prison populations, the impact of demographic trends, and drug-enforcement policy analysis. From crime trends to sentencing guidelines, the impact of his analytical approach to the field is evident in the criminal justice policies and practices of 21<sup>st</sup>-century America.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Al Blumstein Sitting" src="image.aspx?id=10151&amp;width=300&amp;mar=1" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: right;" />Blumstein began his career more than 50 years ago, earning his Ph.D. in Operations Research at Cornell University in 1960. By the time he joined the Heinz College faculty as a founding member in 1969, he had already served as Director of the Office of Urban Research, been a member of the Research Council at the Institute for Defense Analysis, and led a Science and Technology Task Force for President Lyndon B. Johnson&rsquo;s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice. The 1967 report that Commission produced, <em>The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society,</em> would shape the U.S. criminal justice agenda for years to come.</p> <p> Here at Carnegie Mellon University, Blumstein&rsquo;s research has been equally influential. The statistical, data-driven methods he held in common with his fellow founding faculty members have become the hallmark of Heinz College&rsquo;s approach to public policy research.</p> <p> &ldquo;That analytic approach was characteristic of all the founding faculty members here at Heinz,&rdquo; Nagin said. &ldquo;They were all working in different domains, but that was the common denominator. It&rsquo;s what made this school, compared to conventional public administration schools, so revolutionary.&rdquo;</p> <p> Brenda Peyser, Associate Dean of the Heinz College <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">School of Public Policy and Management</a>, agrees.</p> <p> &ldquo;As both a founding member and former Dean of the school, Al has been absolutely instrumental in pretty much everything that has shaped who we are,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;The people he has brought in as assistant professors, including Dean Ramayya Krishnan, are now the key senior members of our faculty.&rdquo;</p> <p> Throughout his nearly five decades at Heinz, Blumstein has continued to be a leader in the field of criminology. In addition to serving as the Dean of Heinz School from 1986 to 1993, he has chaired countless committees and organizations at both the state and national levels. He served as the second President of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), the 34th President of The Institute of Management Sciences (TIMS), and the 26th President of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA). Blumstein is, to date, one of only two individuals to have been president of all three of these organizations.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Al Blumstein Chatting" src="image.aspx?id=10150&amp;width=300&amp;mar=1" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />In addition to his legacy of service and leadership, Blumstein has been honored by leaders in his field with numerous awards over the years for his quality work and innovative research. In 1985, he was awarded ORSA&rsquo;s Kimball Medal for service to the profession and the society. Two years later, he received the American Society of Criminology&rsquo;s Sutherland Award for his contributions to research. In 1998, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering, and was also awarded the Wolfgang Award for Distinguished Achievement in Criminology.</p> <p> In 2007, Blumstein received the Stockholm Prize in Criminology, given for significant contributions to criminological research or practices that combat crime and promote human rights. And in 2012, he was appointed chair of the Science Advisory Board for the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice.</p> <p> &ldquo;Al was the Dean who recruited me to come to Heinz College,&rdquo; said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Heinz College. &ldquo;He has been a valuable mentor and colleague in all my years as a faculty member and as an administrator. His commitment to his students and fellow faculty members, and his leadership in innovating the field of criminology, are unparalleled.&rdquo;</p> <p> Yet for all of his accolades, Blumstein is admired by his colleagues and students alike for his ongoing commitment to educating and nurturing the next generation of scholars and policymakers, serving as advisor for a number of the Systems Synthesis capstone projects that are the culmination of every Heinz student&rsquo;s educational experience at the college.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Al Blumstein Teaching" src="image.aspx?id=10149&amp;width=216&amp;mar=1" style="width: 216.594px; margin: 10px; float: right;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Al is an extremely well-decorated human being,&rdquo; Peyser said. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s led virtually every committee and won virtually every award in his field; he&rsquo;s been quoted in the New York Times. And yet, when a student walks in his office, he treats them with the same respect he would give anybody. He&rsquo;s humble, and he&rsquo;s very, very good at what he does.&rdquo;</p> <div> <p> Blumstein says that these student interactions are one of the most gratifying aspects of his work at Heinz College.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s been extremely rewarding, graduating students who, at the master&rsquo;s level, have such an important leg up on those they might compete with, because of the analytic skills they have that are the essence of what we provide for our students,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> Blumstein also says he has every intention of continuing to promote intelligent public policy through solid, data-driven research.</p> <p> &ldquo;There&rsquo;s still a lot of work that I will to continue to pursue,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;The criminal justice system has changed dramatically from the one I saw when I was on President Johnson&rsquo;s crime commission, and we&rsquo;re now dealing with many problems that were not foreseen 50 years ago. One of the intriguing sessions in the Symposium will examine what we need in a new crime commission, and look at ways in which criminal justice system needs to be fixed.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://starrez.housing.cmu.edu/StarRezPortalConference/Modules/Conference/ConferenceDetails.aspx?Params=L9ezxPcQnQvo2mu47qXm1G03uXNqEECHi%2fvin51ezp7wPRM3bP0az5N53fEkZEDZ" target="_blank">Find out more about the Symposium on Public Policy Analysis, and register here &gt;&gt;</a></p> </div> <p> &nbsp;</p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3848Mon, 26 Mar 2016 15:05:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10144Honoring Al Blumstein's | Contributions to Public Policy

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South Australian Premier's Historic CMU Visithttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3847Image associated with news releaseThe Hon. Jay Weatherill, MP, Premier of South Australia, made a historic visit to Carnegie Mellon University’s Pittsburgh campus March 14 and 15 to see firsthand CMU’s technological innovations in autonomous vehicles, smart cities, robotics, and clean energy. He was warmly welcomed by Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh, who hosted a luncheon in the Premier’s honor at the President’s residence. During his first day at Carnegie Mellon, Premier Weatherill visited H. John Heinz III College. During the Premier’s time at Hamburg Hall, CMU Provost Farnam Jahanian provided him with an overview of CMU as a world-class research university. The Premier was particularly interested in CMU’s track record in being one of the top universities in the U.S. in commercializing federal research grants. He was also interested in CMU’s innovation model that has now been adopted by several U.S. universities.

]]><p style="text-align: right;"> <em style="text-align: right;">This story was originally published on the <a href="http://www.australia.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">CMU Australia</a>&nbsp;</em><span style="text-align: right;">w</span><em style="text-align: right;">ebsite. It is modified and republished with permission.</em></p> <p> The Hon. Jay Weatherill, MP, Premier of South Australia, made a historic visit to Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Pittsburgh campus March 14 and 15 to see firsthand CMU&rsquo;s technological innovations in autonomous vehicles, smart cities, robotics, and clean energy. He was warmly welcomed by <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> President Subra Suresh, who hosted a luncheon in the Premier&rsquo;s honor at the President&rsquo;s residence.</p> <p> During his first day at Carnegie Mellon, Premier Weatherill visited <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>. During the Premier&rsquo;s time at Hamburg Hall, CMU Provost Farnam Jahanian provided him with an overview of CMU as a world-class research university. The Premier was particularly interested in CMU&rsquo;s track record in being one of the top universities in the U.S. in commercializing federal research grants. He was also interested in CMU&rsquo;s innovation model that has now been adopted by several U.S. universities.</p> <p> Dean Ramayya Krishnan of Heinz College and Dean Jim Garrett of the <a href="http://engineering.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">College of Engineering</a> gave the Premier an overview of CMU&rsquo;s role in the promotion of smart cities through the <a href="http://metrolab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">MetroLab Network</a> and the <a href="http://metro21.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Metro21</a> initiative. Through the MetroLab Network, CMU coordinates a nationwide effort between select cities and universities that collaborate to apply technology-driven solutions to urban problems.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Premier Weatherill and President Suresh" src="image.aspx?id=10147&amp;width=300&amp;mar=1" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p> The highlight of the first day was the Premier&rsquo;s test drive of the self-driving Cadillac SRX, a product of the <a href="http://gm.web.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">General Motors-CMU Autonomous Vehicle program</a>. Under the supervision of Professor Raj Rajkumar, co-director of the GM-CMU program, Premier Weatherill experienced an autonomous test ride under normal or uncontrolled traffic conditions.</p> <p> &ldquo;At first it was a white-knuckle experience,&rdquo; the Premier said, &ldquo;but the whole ride went smoothly; it was amazing.&rdquo;</p> <p> The Premier thus joins a select group of individuals, including several members of U.S. Congress, who have tested the vehicles on an open road.</p> <p> &ldquo;The experience confirms for me that the age of the driverless car has truly arrived,&rdquo; said Professor Emil Bolongaita, Executive Director of <a href="http://www.australia.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">CMU Australia</a>, who was in the vehicle with the Premier. &ldquo;In due course, this will revolutionize many industries and sharply enhance the safety and quality of people&rsquo;s lives.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Autonomous Vehicle Demonstration" src="image.aspx?id=10145&amp;width=300&amp;mar=1" style="margin: 10px; float: right; width: 30%;" /></p> <p> During his second day at CMU, the Premier gave a Keynote Speech at an international energy conference organized by CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/energy/" target="_blank">Scott Institute for Energy Innovation</a>. Introduced by Scott Institute Director and CMU President Emeritus Jerry Cohon, the Premier underscored in his speech the challenge of climate change, calling it a &ldquo;race against time,&rdquo; and announced the South Australia Low Carbon Entrepreneur Prize to foster innovative low-carbon industries.</p> <p> The Premier also held meetings with the CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.sei.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Software Engineering Institute</a> to discuss cybersecurity. He ended his visit with a tour of the various cutting-edge projects on robotics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence at the <a href="http://www.ri.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Robotics Institute</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;South Australia is very proud of its relationship with Carnegie Mellon, and through its South Australia campus, we look forward to further collaboration in the years ahead,&rdquo; Premier Weatherill said.</p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3847Mon, 25 Mar 2016 10:05:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10143South Australian Premier's | Historic CMU Visit

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From Classroom to Collaboration: Heinz Students Team Up with the City of Pittsburghhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3843Image associated with news releaseFrom creating modern solutions to traffic problems to enhancing officers’ ability to ensure public safety, H. John Heinz III College students are applying their learning in countless ways to solve some of society’s biggest challenges. Through their semester-long Systems Synthesis capstone projects, they collaborated with the City of Pittsburgh during the fall 2015 academic semester in a variety of ways to provide integrated, data-driven research and recommendations to help improve daily life for residents of the Steel City.

]]><p> From creating modern solutions to traffic problems to developing innovative tools that can help city officials in ensuring public safety, <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> students are applying their learning in countless ways to solve some of society&rsquo;s biggest challenges. Through their semester-long Systems Synthesis capstone projects, they collaborated with the <a href="http://pittsburghpa.gov/" target="_blank">City of Pittsburgh</a> during the fall 2015 academic semester in a variety of ways to provide integrated, data-driven research and recommendations to help improve daily life for residents of the Steel City.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx" target="_blank">Masters of Information Systems Management (MISM)</a> students Eric Adlam and Zoe Levenson teamed up with <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Masters of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM)</a> students Qingyi Cao and Michael Lampl to evaluate the feasibility of an automated shuttle system in and out of the Almono site currently being developed in Hazelwood. In 2002, four southwestern Pennsylvania foundations purchased the site, partnering with the Regional Industrial Development Corporation (RIDC) to transform it into a sustainable, eco-friendly, high-tech, and smart living and working community.</p> <p> This development is well in line with the Mayor Bill Peduto&rsquo;s mission to grow Pittsburgh&rsquo;s population and cultivate the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs. Yet establishing effective and efficient traffic routes between Almono and its surrounding neighborhoods will be a real challenge. In particular, PennDOT is concerned that increased traffic between Hazelwood and Oakland may require an expensive roadway improvement initiative to avoid traffic and congestion.</p> <p> As an alternative to such an expensive initiative, the Heinz team has proposed an autonomous, electric shuttle system that would allow Almono to stay true to its vision of net-zero emissions, while providing safe and reliable routes in and out of the site. According to the team, the final results of their feasibility analysis may help Pittsburgh become a U.S. pioneer in autonomous shuttle services.</p> <p> Meanwhile, MSPPM students Vivian Chang, Eric Faulk, Danielle Gewurz, and Chenyu Wang, together with MISM student ShuoYing Pu, collaborated with PA 2-1-1 Southwest, the United Way of Allegheny County&rsquo;s information and referral service, which connects individuals in need of social assistance to regional providers of everything from utilities and housing to mental services and tax preparation.</p> <p> As the United Way expands its coverage area beyond Allegheny County into other parts of southwestern Pennsylvania, its client base has grown by the tens of thousands. Faced with this surge in demand, the United Way asked the Heinz team to evaluate ways in which 2-1-1 can grow to meet its clients&rsquo; needs, without sacrificing its characteristic quality of service.</p> <p> Based on its analysis, the team was able to make several recommendations for ways in which PA 2-1-1 can ensure that its future growth will be sustainable and cost-effective. For example, the team members recommended that 2-1-1 switch to using online chatting and texting as its main channels of communication, as relying on these methods would allow operators to handle a much greater volume of clients, without a significant investment in infrastructure or staffing. They also urged 2-1-1 to train its operators in cross-channel competencies, as it transitions into an integrated data system.</p> <p> Moving from public service to public safety, another team of MSPPM students, Adam Morgan, Robin Yonglim Park, Jonathan Peterson-Ruiz, and Suo Yang teamed up with <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/arts-management-mam/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Arts Management (MAM)</a> student Katherine Martine and MISM student Kiriakos Kontostathis to investigate the potential use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to improve public safety in and around Pittsburgh. The team made several recommendations to the city for ways that the Fire and Police Bureaus, as well as the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, could use UAS in Emergency Management Operations to increase their operational efficiency and enhance the well being of citizens.</p> <p> Specifically, the students concluded that a UAS would allow these officials to live-monitor critical incidents such as hostage situations, active shooters, or hazardous waste spills from a safe distance, preventing harm to actual officers. UAS could also be used to document crime and automotive crash scenes more quickly and effectively. The images and data taken from the UAS could be uploaded to software that would recreate the crime or crash scenes with 3-D maps, providing officers with additional information to aid them in their investigations.</p> <p> The semester-long <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/capstone-projects/index.aspx" target="_blank">Systems Synthesis projects</a> are a great opportunity for Heinz College students to work together with different organizations across the city to solve societal challenges and improve the quality of services being delivered to Pittsburgh residents, applying what they&rsquo;ve learned in the classroom to real-world challenges.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the School of Public Policy and Management &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the School of Information Systems and Management &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/capstone-projects/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about Systems Synthesis projects &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3843Mon, 23 Mar 2016 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10131From Classroom to Collaboration: Heinz Students Team Up with the City of Pittsburgh

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Pittsburgh Named a Finalist in Smart City Challengehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3845Image associated with news releaseThe City of Pittsburgh was named a finalist in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Smart City Challenge. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx made the announcement on March 12 at the annual South by Southwest Interactive Festival. Pittsburgh was one of seven finalists selected from a pool of 78 mid-sized U.S. cities that submitted proposals for the Challenge. The DOT will award a $40 million grant to one winning city for the development of smart city initiatives. Carnegie Mellon University has formally partnered with the City of Pittsburgh in researching and developing smart city technologies since July of 2014, when they collaborated to develop the Metro21 research and educational initiative. And last September, CMU and Pittsburgh announced their partnership as founding members of the MetroLab Network, a new national alliance among 20 metro areas and more than 25 neighboring universities to research, develop, and deploy innovative technologies to address critical challenges facing urban areas. CMU also played an important role in helping the City of Pittsburgh prepare its proposal for the Smart Cities Challenge, which focused on the intersection of transportation and energy. The CMU writing team for the proposal featured Stan Caldwell, Executive Director of CMU’s Traffic21 research institute, Courtney Ehrlichman, Deputy Executive Director of Traffic21, and Raj Rajkumar, George Westinghouse Professor in CMU’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Director of the Technologies for Safe and Efficient Transportation (T-SET) National University Center, and Director of the Metro21 Initiative.

]]><p style="text-align: right;"> <em style="text-align: right;">Photo by AP/Vulcan Inc.</em></p> <p> The <a href="http://pittsburghpa.gov/" target="_blank">City of Pittsburgh</a> was named a finalist in the U.S. Department of Transportation&rsquo;s (DOT) <a href="https://www.transportation.gov/smartcity" target="_blank">Smart City Challenge</a>. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx made the announcement on March 12 at the annual <a href="http://www.sxsw.com/" target="_blank">South by Southwest Interactive Festival</a>.</p> <p> Pittsburgh was one of seven finalists selected from a pool of 78 mid-sized U.S. cities that submitted proposals for the Challenge. The DOT will award a $40 million grant to one winning city for the development of smart city initiatives.</p> <p> Urban centers around the world have made smart city growth a fundamental element of their 21<sup>st</sup>-century development. Smart cities use digital technology and data analytics to integrate city services and develop solutions to challenges that affect the economy and quality of life in metro areas.</p> <p> The DOT selected the finalists based on their plans to create tangible tools that facilitate 12 Vision Elements that the DOT outlined to prospective cities, including urban automation; connected vehicles; intelligent, sensor-based infrastructure; and urban analytics.</p> <p> &ldquo;The level of excitement and energy the Smart City Challenge has created around the country far exceeded our expectations,&rdquo; said Secretary Foxx. &ldquo;After an overwhelming response &ndash; 78 applications total &ndash; we chose to select seven finalists instead of five because of their outstanding potential to transform the future of urban transportation.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a> has formally partnered with the City of Pittsburgh in researching and developing smart city technologies since July of 2014, when they collaborated to develop the <a href="http://metro21.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Metro21</a> research and educational initiative. And last September, Carnegie Mellon and Pittsburgh announced their partnership as founding members of the <a href="http://metrolab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">MetroLab Network</a>, a new national alliance among 20 metro areas and more than 25 neighboring universities to research, develop, and deploy innovative technologies to address critical challenges facing urban areas.</p> <p> CMU also played an important role in helping the City of Pittsburgh prepare its proposal for the Smart Cities Challenge, which focused on the intersection of transportation and energy. The CMU writing team for the proposal featured Stan Caldwell, Executive Director of CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Traffic21</a> research institute, Courtney Ehrlichman, Deputy Executive Director of Traffic21, and Raj Rajkumar, George Westinghouse Professor in CMU&rsquo;s Department of <a href="http://www.ece.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Electrical and Computer Engineering</a>, Director of the <a href="http://utc.ices.cmu.edu/utc/" target="_blank">Technologies for Safe and Efficient Transportation (T-SET) National University Center</a>, and Director of the Metro21 initiative.</p> <p> For his part, <a href="https://users.ece.cmu.edu/~raj/index.html">Rajkumar</a> has been at the forefront of utilizing embedded real-time systems to develop transportation-based smart city technologies. In 2009, the <a href="https://www.ieee.org/index.html" target="_blank">Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)</a> Technical Committee on Real-Time Systems honored Rajkumar with its Outstanding Technical Achievement and Leadership Award. In addition to T-SET, Rajkumar also directs Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s <a href="http://rtml.ece.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Real-Time and Multimedia Systems Laboratory (RTML)</a>. He is also a leader in researching and facilitating CMU&rsquo;s autonomous vehicle development programs, serving as co-director of the <a href="http://gm.web.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">General Motors-Carnegie Mellon Connected and Autonomous Driving Collaborative Research Laboratory (CAD-CRL)</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;This march does not stop here,&rdquo; Rajkumar said. &ldquo;This is only one of the first steps of a long &nbsp;journey. We have come far, but we have a long way to go, and this is good progress on our path forward.&rdquo;</p> <p> Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and Rajkumar outlined Pittsburgh&rsquo;s plans for the next phase of the competition, as well as its long-term plans for continuing to develop Pittsburgh into a world-class smart city, at a March 15 press conference at Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s Jared L. Cohon University Center.</p> <p> &ldquo;Our proposal basically breaks down into four areas,&rdquo; Mayor Peduto said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s the modes of transportation and the way that we&rsquo;re able to provide them, the technology and how it can become greater, the ability to overlay transportation with new energy options, and an open platform, so that the information that we create can be shared to not only change Pittsburgh, but to change the world.&rdquo;</p> <p> Peduto described a Pittsburgh that will increase opportunities for mobility for all city residents and reduce emissions by 50 percent by 2030 through the use of electric vehicles and autonomous public transportation systems. He outlined the city&rsquo;s plans to use smart traffic signals to end gridlock and congestion downtown, allowing all methods of transportation to move around effectively. He also spoke of the importance of all of these transportation systems connecting with one another using sensor technology that will be developed within Pittsburgh&rsquo;s public infrastructure.</p> <p> &ldquo;We believe that these smart city technologies that the mayor outlined very articulately can actually make Pittsburgh not just one of the smartest cities in the country, but one of the smartest cities in the world,&rdquo; Rajkumar said.</p> <p> In the second phase of the competition, the seven finalists will receive a $100,000 grant to further develop their proposals. Whereas the first phase called for a high-level overview, the winning city will be selected based on its ability to think big, and provide a detailed roadmap on how it will integrate innovative technologies to prototype the future of transportation in its city.</p> <p> The winning city will be announced in June. And over the next eight weeks, Carnegie Mellon will continue to work closely with the City of Pittsburgh to develop a winning proposal. Many CMU research initiatives and projects, including the <a href="http://mac.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Mobility Data Analytics Center</a>, <a href="http://www.surtrac.net/" target="_blank">Scalable Urban Traffic Control (SURTRAC)</a>, and the <a href="http://www.sei.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Software Engineering Institute</a>, among others, will be featured players in helping Pittsburgh bring DOT&rsquo;s 12 Vision Elements to life through corporeal urban technologies.</p> <p> &ldquo;Pittsburgh is quickly emerging as a leading center for innovations that use technology and data to address the challenges facing our cities and improve life for their residents,&rdquo; said CMU President Subra Suresh. &ldquo;Building on close collaboration among public, private, and academic sectors, Pittsburgh holds the promise of becoming one of the most technologically progressive cities in the world.&quot;</p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3845Mon, 22 Mar 2016 10:05:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10142Pittsburgh Named a Finalist | in Smart City Challenge

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Broadband and Smart Cities: Ken Fellman Visits CMUhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3841Image associated with news releaseIn January, Fellman, a local government telecommunications attorney and former Mayor of Arvada, Colorado, appeared before a group of Carnegie Mellon University students at Porter Hall. The lecture and talkback was presented by Carnegie Mellon University’s University Lecture Series, and was co-hosted by the Dietrich College Dean’s Office and the Department of Engineering and Public Policy. Fellman spoke to the importance of fast and efficient broadband service to the development of smart cities. He pointed out that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) aspires for the United States to lead the world in download speed and the number of homes with fiber-optic broadband connectivity by 2020. But as a nation, the U.S. currently ranks around 16th on most international broadband rankings lists. Fellman said that this widespread lack of broadband access across the U.S. makes the implementation and development of fully integrated smart cities extremely difficult. In Pittsburgh, H. John Heinz College students have collaborated with the City of Pittsburgh on two Systems Synthesis capstone projects that explored the availability of Wi-Fi in the Pittsburgh metropolitan region and gave recommendations for steps the city can take to help bridge the digital divide between residents who have easy access to the Internet and those who do not.

]]><p> In the smart cities of the not-too-distant future, information and communication technologies will improve the lives of citizens in countless ways. Through collecting data and opening up communication networks, these cities will enable enhanced interactivity between citizens and government officials, ensure better public safety, and improve everything from utilities and transportation to crime prevention and health care.&nbsp;</p> <p> But for these smart cities to be successful, they will require serious bandwidth and widespread broadband connectivity among all residents.</p> <p> &ldquo;If you&rsquo;re going to provide useful services and tools to your citizens, those people need to be connected in a way that makes the tools useful,&rdquo; Ken Fellman said.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.kandf.com/attorneys/kenneth-s-fellman" target="_blank">Fellman</a>, a local government telecommunications attorney and former Mayor of Arvada, Colorado, appeared before a group of <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a> students at Porter Hall in January. The lecture and talkback was presented by CMU&rsquo;s University Lecture Series, and was co-hosted by the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/" target="_blank">Dietrich College</a> Dean&rsquo;s Office and the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/epp/" target="_blank">Department of Engineering and Public Policy</a>.</p> <p> Fellman pointed out that the <a href="http://www.fcc.gov/" target="_blank">Federal Communications Commission (FCC)</a> aspires for the United States to lead the world in download speed and the number of homes with fiber-optic broadband connectivity by 2020. But as a nation, the U.S. currently ranks around 16<sup>th</sup> on most international broadband rankings lists. Fellman said that this widespread lack of broadband access across the U.S. makes the implementation and development of fully integrated smart cities extremely difficult.</p> <p> And because the term &lsquo;&rdquo;smart cities&rdquo; primarily calls to mind metropolitan areas, Fellman encouraged researchers and policymakers to focus on developing smart <em>communities</em>. He emphasized the fact that in rural settings, fiber-optic connectivity can facilitate the detection of everything from avalanches to forest fires, as well as drastically improve the quality of health care in isolated areas.</p> <p> &ldquo;Think of someone who has to drive two hours just to get their heart monitor checked,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;What if it could be checked, and even adjusted, remotely? We&rsquo;ve just improved that person&rsquo;s quality of life <em>and</em> reduced health care costs. Now multiply that many times over.&rdquo;</p> <p> According to the most recent studies, 53 percent of rural Americans lack access to high-speed broadband that would make this kind of remote care possible. Even worse, a staggering 63 percent of Americans living on tribal lands lack access to even the slowest broadband speeds. For these nearly 2.5 million Native Americans, a functional Internet connection is a distant dream, let alone fiber-optic connectivity.</p> <p> &ldquo;Whether you live in rural, urban, or suburban areas, there are so many benefits to a &lsquo;high fiber&rsquo; diet,&rdquo; Fellman said. &ldquo;Yet according to the FCC&rsquo;s recent measurements, it&rsquo;s clear that, as a nation, we are seriously undernourished.&rdquo;</p> <p> It&rsquo;s not for a lack of trying. Fellman said that, across the nation, many municipalities want to become more actively involved in connecting their constituents. But 20 U.S. states have passed statutes that create hurdles or prohibit local governments from deploying broadband networks.</p> <p> Fellman explained that this legislation is generally drafted by lobbyists for incumbent Internet providers who are interested in protecting their market share.</p> <p> As a member of the FCC&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.fcc.gov/about-fcc/advisory-committees/general/intergovernmental-advisory-committee" target="_blank">Intergovernmental Advisory Committee</a>, Fellman advocates eliminating the statutory barriers that prevent local governments from providing their constituents with the broadband services and speeds necessary for smart communities to function.</p> <p> &ldquo;The private sector isn&rsquo;t going to solve this on its own,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Local governments have a huge stake in getting this done, and they&rsquo;re the ones that need to be at the forefront of deciding, &lsquo;what do we want? Are we comfortable with availability and cost of what we have now? And if not, what can we do to change it?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p> The <a href="http://pittsburghpa.gov/" target="_blank">City of Pittsburgh</a> recently addressed these questions when it partnered with a group of <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> students to address the issue of digital equity in the City of Pittsburgh. Students from the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM)</a> and <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/arts-management-mam/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Arts Management (MAM)</a> programs exhaustively researched this topic during the fall 2015 semester and made recommendations to city officials for their Systems Synthesis capstone project.</p> <p> The City of Pittsburgh&rsquo;s <a href="http://pittsburghpa.gov/innovation-performance/home" target="_blank">Department of Innovation and Performance</a> tasked the Systems team with exploring the digital divide in the city between residents who have ready access to the Internet and those who do not, as well as learning best practices to begin to the bridge the divide. The team analyzed various national and local data sources, consulted national and local experts in this field, and researched city case studies to develop recommendations.</p> <p> &ldquo;Digital equity can encompass a lot of different things,&rdquo; said Katy Getsie, a second-year MSPPM student who was involved with the project. &ldquo;The end goal is not so much just to blanket the city with Wi-Fi, because the people who don&rsquo;t have access frequently have other issues as well, like not having a device or laptop, or not having the knowledge on how to use a device.</p> <p> &ldquo;We wanted to help the city answer questions like, &lsquo;how do we get our citizens online and using the Internet to their advantage? Are Internet service providers providing the service they say they are? And what does broadband speed look like in our city?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p> Based on its findings, the student Systems team recommended to the City of Pittsburgh that it conduct surveys and focus groups to better understand the digital divide, provide increased access to the Internet, devices, and digital literacy training by establishing local and regional partnerships and researching and applying for grant funding, and promote current digital equity initiatives to city residents and city employees.</p> <p> Fellman feels strongly that local governments like the City of Pittsburgh, working alongside their communities, should have the freedom to make these decisions for themselves, and that this is the best way to ensure that these communities develop faster, more affordable broadband systems that will help smart communities grow and flourish.</p> <p> &ldquo;My very strong philosophy has always been that we need to use whatever technology tools are available to connect citizens to government better than we are now, and make better use of the data that these connections will generate,&rdquo; Fellman said. &ldquo;We also need people who have the technical knowledge and capability to be able to make the most of that information.&rdquo;</p> <p> To that end, Carnegie Mellon University has responded to this need by becoming a founding member of the <a href="http://metrolab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">MetroLab Network</a>, in partnership with the City of Pittsburgh. This network of more than 20 city-university partnerships brings together university researchers with city decision-makers to research, design, develop, deploy, and evaluate solutions to the challenges affecting the economy and quality of life in metro areas.</p> <p> During his presentation, Fellman praised Heinz College&rsquo;s role in the MetroLab Network and the <a href="http://metro21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Metro21</a> Initiative, telling the audience that local leaders, policymakers, and anyone else with a stake in making their community a better place have a responsibility to push for changes that will make citizens more connected.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;We want citizens to be more involved with local government, we want them to be safe, and we want to make their lives easier,&rdquo; Fellman said. &ldquo;Becoming a smart city is a critically important part of that process.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://metrolab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Learn more about the MetroLab Network &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://metro21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Learn more about the Metro21 Initiative &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3841Mon, 14 Mar 2016 10:20:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10129Broadband and Smart Cities: Ken Fellman Visits CMU

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Jesse Berst Lauds Pittsburgh’s Smart City Developmenthttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3842Image associated with news releaseFor Jesse Berst, smart cities represent the next big step in human innovation that will have a groundbreaking impact on improving the lives of people around the globe. According to Berst, Founder and Chairman of the Smart Cities Council, achieving this transformation will depend on the close collaboration of city officials and utility companies. Berst says that legislators, private sector energy providers, and research institutions must work together to develop an integrated approach to implementing smart technologies that will allow city services to communicate with one another in responding to the needs of citizens. So Berst was very pleased to witness firsthand the work that the City of Pittsburgh is doing in collaboration with partners like Carnegie Mellon University and Duquesne Light in using digital technology to improve community life. Berst visited Pittsburgh in January to meet with officials from the City of Pittsburgh, including Mayor Bill Peduto, and with representatives from Carnegie Mellon’s major smart city research initiatives: Metro21, Traffic21, and the MetroLab Network. Berst also took time to speak to H. John Heinz III College students about why the smart city sector has entered the “early mainstream” phase, and what the future holds for the evolution of smart cities.

]]><p> For Jesse Berst, smart cities represent the next big step in human innovation that will have a groundbreaking impact on improving the lives of people around the globe.</p> <p> &ldquo;The biggest jump of all was electricity, the second biggest of all was the Internet, and the next big jump up is smart cities,&rdquo; said Berst. &ldquo;We can really have it all. We can have livability, and workability, and sustainability. And I think that in as little as 10 years, urban life will be completely transformed, and city services will come to you.&rdquo;</p> <p> According to Berst, Founder and Chairman of the <a href="http://smartcitiescouncil.com/" target="_blank">Smart Cities Council</a>, achieving this transformation will depend on the close collaboration of city officials and utility companies. Berst says that legislators, private sector energy providers, and research institutions must work together to develop an integrated approach to implementing smart technologies that will allow city services to communicate with one another in responding to the needs of citizens.</p> <p> So Berst was very pleased to witness firsthand the work that the <a href="http://pittsburghpa.gov/" target="_blank">City of Pittsburgh</a> is doing in collaboration with partners like <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a> and <a href="http://www.duquesnelight.com/" target="_blank">Duquesne Light</a> in using digital technology to improve community life.</p> <p> &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been so glad in my days here in Pittsburgh to learn that the city and your local utility are both actively looking for ways that they can join forces, share infrastructure, share costs, and share data,&rdquo; Berst said. &ldquo;In so many places I have visited, this has been an uphill climb. But Duquesne Light is a great example. They are really sincere about being a partner to the city.&rdquo;</p> <p> Berst visited Pittsburgh in January to meet with officials from the City of Pittsburgh, including Mayor Bill Peduto, and with representatives from Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s major smart city research initiatives: <a href="http://metro21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Metro21</a>, <a href="http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Traffic21</a>, and the <a href="http://metrolab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">MetroLab Network</a>. Berst also took time to speak to <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a> students about why the smart city sector has entered the &ldquo;early mainstream&rdquo; phase, and what the future holds for the evolution of smart cities.</p> <p> &ldquo;Pittsburgh&rsquo;s got a great vision, and that&rsquo;s a terrific starting point,&rdquo; Berst said. &ldquo;Now you&rsquo;re beginning to think about things in an integrated fashion. So [Mayor] Bill [Peduto] talks about combining energy, information and communications technology, and transportation. And those are the three big issues in most metro areas. So that&rsquo;s a great place. Now as long as they build these in a future-friendly way, they&rsquo;ll have an enabling platform that then can incorporate additional departments later on this same basic platform.&rdquo;</p> <p> Building these platforms in a future-friendly way is where Carnegie Mellon plays an important role in collaborating with the City of Pittsburgh. Since 2014, Metro21&rsquo;s researchers have partnered with their home metro of Pittsburgh as a test bed for their work designing, developing, deploying, and evaluating solutions to the challenges affecting the economy and quality of life in metro areas. And last September, CMU and the City of Pittsburgh took their collaboration a step further as founding members of the MetroLab Network &ndash; a network of more than 20 city-university partnerships throughout the U.S. focused on developing smart cities.</p> <p> &ldquo;All over the world, one of the &lsquo;secret sauces&rsquo; that we see is cities and research universities,&rdquo; Berst said. &ldquo;Not every city has that blessing. You&rsquo;re really blessed to have a university in Carnegie Mellon that has influence and ideas beyond its size.&rdquo;</p> <p> Carnegie Mellon adapts those ideas into projects that benefit Pittsburgh&rsquo;s residents on a daily basis. For example, a group of Metro21 researches recently developed easy-to-use <a href="http://www.specksensor.com/" target="_blank">Speck</a> air quality monitors that are available for checkout at 14 different <a href="http://www.carnegielibrary.org/" target="_blank">Carnegie Library</a> branches across Pittsburgh. The Speck Sensors empower citizens to understand sources of harmful fine particle matter within their homes and to take steps to improve the air they breathe.</p> <p> Another team of CMU researchers contributed to the development of smarter, multi-modal, multi-jurisdictional transportation systems that communicate with one another to improve efficiency and cost-effectiveness. These include &ldquo;<a href="http://www.surtrac.net/" target="_blank">smart traffic signals</a>,&rdquo; which reduced vehicle wait time by 42 percent at a busy intersection in the East Liberty neighborhood of Pittsburgh.</p> <p> Berst said that Pittsburgh&rsquo;s continued development into a fully integrated smart city is reliant on two primary factors.</p> <p> &ldquo;You have a great collection of projects, you have a great concentration around mobility and traffic, and you&rsquo;ve got some great pilot projects,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Now I think the two things that you currently have underway and need to continue to focus on are integration and scale. Both of these create these new sets of problems that you might not have expected.&rdquo;</p> <p> Berst also said that Heinz College&rsquo;s students and faculty can have a major impact on Pittsburgh&rsquo;s smart city evolution as thought leaders in the field of public policy.</p> <p> &ldquo;When I talk about an &lsquo;integrated approach,&rsquo; I am also talking about an integrated look at policy, and I think this is where Heinz comes in,&rdquo; Berst said. &ldquo;Sometimes, very obvious benefits to a community run into well-meaning regulations that prevent the implementation of some of these innovative solutions. So there needs to be some policy-driven thought behind this, because otherwise each smart city project is going to bump into these things, and it will be a slow climb.</p> <p> &ldquo;I really think that the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">School of Public Policy and Management</a> needs to think about ways to understand and support this. It can take a leadership role in creating some simple checklists or templates to help cities identify obstacles that they might run into, or changes they may want to make to unleash some of these technologies for social good. Because otherwise, it will be policy that will be the ice jam.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://smartcitiescouncil.com/" target="_blank">Learn more about the Smart Cities Council &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://metrolab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Learn more about the MetroLab Network &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://metro21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Learn more about Metro21 &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Learn more about Traffic 21 &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the School of Public Policy and Management &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3842Mon, 14 Mar 2016 10:08:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10132Jesse Berst Lauds | Pittsburgh’s Smart City Development

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Privacy Regulation, Incentives, and Health Care Tech Adoptionhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3840Image associated with news releaseHealth information exchanges (HIEs) provide information technology solutions that allow patients’ electronic medical records to be shared among otherwise disconnected health care organizations. HIE efforts seek to improve efficiency and quality of care, but they have raised substantial concerns associated with the privacy of patients’ data. To date, 25 states and the District of Columbia have enacted legislation to incentivize HIE efforts (most often by providing funding), address patient privacy concerns, or both. Often, privacy regulation is seen as an obstacle to technological innovation and the adoption of new services. In a study forthcoming in the INFORMS journal Management Science, however, researchers from the University of Notre Dame, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Michigan find that among states with HIE laws, only those that combined incentives with privacy requirements for patient consent saw a net increase in HIEs that were actively exchanging information (operational HIEs).

]]><p style="text-align: right;"> <em>This story was originally published on the</em>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2016/march/health-care-privacy.html" target="_blank">www.cmu.edu</a>&nbsp;<em>website. It is republished with permission.</em></p> <p> Health information exchanges (HIEs) provide information technology solutions that allow patients&rsquo; electronic medical records to be shared among otherwise disconnected health care organizations. HIE efforts seek to improve efficiency and quality of care, but they have raised substantial concerns associated with the privacy of patients&rsquo; data.</p> <div> <p> To date, 25 states and the District of Columbia have enacted legislation to incentivize HIE efforts (most often by providing funding), address patient privacy concerns, or both. Often, privacy regulation is seen as an obstacle to technological innovation and the adoption of new services.</p> <p> In a study forthcoming in the INFORMS journal <a href="http://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/10.1287/mnsc.2015.2194" target="_blank">Management Science</a>, however, researchers from the University of Notre Dame, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Michigan find that among states with HIE laws, only those that combined incentives with privacy requirements for patient consent saw a net increase in HIEs that were actively exchanging information (operational HIEs).</p> <p> &ldquo;Conventional wisdom suggests that increased privacy regulation impedes technological innovation. We provide evidence that this is not always the case,&rdquo; said Idris Adjerid, assistant professor of management at the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame.</p> <p> &ldquo;To understand the impact of privacy regulation on innovation, we must not treat regulation coarsely, as a binary, yes/no variable. Our findings show that privacy regulatory interventions can take many forms, and produce a nuanced array of effects on technological adoption,&rdquo; said <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=3" target="_blank">Alessandro Acquisti</a>, professor of information technology and public policy at CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>.</p> <p> The researchers analyzed semi-annual data from 2004 to 2009 to compare the probability of a health care market having a HIE in the planning or operational stages with different legislative approaches to offering incentives and patient privacy protections.</p> <p> &ldquo;Two of the most significant barriers to planning and operating a health information exchange are cost and patient privacy,&rdquo; said Julia Adler-Milstein, assistant professor of information and health management and policy at the University of Michigan&rsquo;s School of Information and School of Public Health.</p> <p> &ldquo;States that offer incentives to alleviate some of the financial burden of building the technical and administrative infrastructure of a HIE and require that patients opt-in to the exchange of their personal data are encountering the most success,&rdquo; said <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=104" target="_blank">Rahul Telang</a>, professor of information systems at CMU&rsquo;s Heinz College.</p> <p> During the period studied, a number of states passed legislation that provided the optimal provisions for HIE growth &mdash; incentives combined with patient consent. Of all attempts to incentivize HIE efforts, only those coupled with privacy regulation including consent requirements resulted in a net-gain in HIE efforts: health care markets in these states saw an 11 percent net-increase in the propensity of having an operational HIE.</p> <p> States that offered incentives without any privacy regulation saw no measureable gain in the propensity of a health care market to have an HIE in the planning or operational stages. HIE efforts were negatively affected when states enacted privacy regulation without providing incentives for their creation.</p> <p> &ldquo;We also found that health information exchanges in states that offered incentives and required patient consent reported fewer challenges from patient privacy concerns than those in states with other legislative approaches,&rdquo; said <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=72" target="_blank">Rema Padman</a>, professor of management science and health care informatics at CMU&rsquo;s Heinz College.</p> <p> The results suggest that privacy regulation can act as an enabler for incentives aimed at subsidizing the deployment of technologies that may be privacy-sensitive.</p> </div> <p> &nbsp;</p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3840Mon, 03 Mar 2016 14:41:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10127Privacy Regulation, Incentives, and Health Care Tech Adoption

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John Fetterman's Leadership Journeyhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3839Image associated with news releaseJohn Fetterman,Mayor of Braddock, PA and current U.S. senatorial candidate, recently visited H. John Heinz III College to speak to a group of students from the School of Public Policy and Management about effective leadership, and to share his personal journey of public service. Fetterman said he began developing his practical approach to public policy nearly 20 years ago, as a student and AmeriCorps member here in Pittsburgh. One class in particular, Media and Public and Policy at Heinz College, has stuck with him through the years. Now, Fetterman is using his conviction and experience to run for the U.S. Senate, where he hopes to bring solutions to the same kinds of policy challenges he’s been working to correct in Braddock for the past three terms as mayor.

]]><p> For Mayor John Fetterman, public policy is like medicine: it should be practiced where it&rsquo;s needed the most.</p> <p> &ldquo;When I was in your shoes, getting ready to graduate, I never wanted to move to Portland, Oregon and make it more delightful than it already is,&rdquo; said Fetterman.</p> <p> Fetterman, Mayor of Braddock, Pennsylvania and current U.S. senatorial candidate, recently visited <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> to speak to a group of students from the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">School of Public Policy and Management</a> about effective leadership, and to share his personal journey of public service.</p> <p> &ldquo;A lot of you may be planning to move to D.C. or San Francisco when you finish here,&rdquo; he told the students. &ldquo;And I can understand why. But you practice public policy someplace like that, you&rsquo;re basically a cosmetic surgeon. What&rsquo;s going to happen to the poor communities that need help, that aren&rsquo;t attracting young, ambitious, and accomplished people like yourselves?&rdquo;</p> <p> For his part, Fetterman has spent the past 15 years improving lives in Braddock, PA, a once-prosperous community that lost 90 percent of its population following the collapse of the steel industry. When Fetterman first arrived in in Braddock in 2001 to set up a GED program as an <a href="http://www.nationalservice.gov/programs/americorps" target="_blank">AmeriCorps</a> volunteer, it was one of the most impoverished and crime-ridden communities in Pennsylvania.</p> <p> As a GED program director, Fetterman immediately set out to empower members of this community by helping them to not only earn their GEDs, but to get their driver&rsquo;s licenses and find work. But when two of his clients lost their lives to gun violence, he knew he had to do more to combat the larger systemic issues that were putting his students in such dangerous situations in the first place.</p> <p> So in 2005, though he had only been in Braddock for a few years, he decided to run for mayor &ndash; a risky choice, for many reasons.</p> <p> &ldquo;Believe me when I say that people like me don&rsquo;t run for mayor,&rdquo; he quipped. &ldquo;But I decided to go for it, because I figured I could at least use my platform to talk about some of these issues that are so important to me.&rdquo;</p> <p> Much to his surprise, the community rallied around him, electing him in the end by the slimmest possible margin: one vote, submitted via a provisional ballot.</p> <p> &ldquo;Whoever that one person was, they changed the trajectory of my life,&rdquo; said Fetterman.</p> <p> Since then, his popularity has only continued to rise. Now in his third term as mayor, Fetterman attributes the success he&rsquo;s had in Braddock to his realistic approach to public policy, which has allowed him to affect real change in the once-broken community.</p> <p> &ldquo;When I got elected, I was very honest with people: Braddock was never going to be what it was, and I knew that,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re not getting a Starbucks anytime soon. Whole Foods isn&rsquo;t looking at lots. But I am having conversation with Save-A-Lot, whose representatives are saying &lsquo;hey, there&rsquo;s really something going on down there.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p> In addition to stimulating the economy with new business partnerships, Fetterman is proud of his work with local law enforcement. By raising the salary for police officers, while holding them more accountable for their actions, he has drastically reduced crime in the area, rekindling the community&rsquo;s trust in its police force.</p> <p> &ldquo;We didn&rsquo;t achieve the crime reductions we&rsquo;ve seen by oppressing our community,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We did it by embracing and working with them. And I hold this up as a beacon to communities facing similar challenges, because if it can happen in Braddock, it can happen in other places, too.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fetterman says he began developing his practical approach to public policy nearly 20 years ago, as a student and AmeriCorps member here in Pittsburgh. One class in particular, Media and Public and Policy at Heinz College, has stuck with him through the years.</p> <p> &ldquo;To this day, that remains the most valuable course I&rsquo;ve ever taken with respects to my professional career,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;And that&rsquo;s not a politician pandering to his audience; it&rsquo;s true. It made me a better person, and has paid back in dividends every single day.&rdquo;</p> <p> Now, Fetterman is using his conviction and experience to run for the U.S. Senate, where he hopes to bring attention to the same kinds of inequalities he&rsquo;s been working to correct in Braddock for the past three terms as mayor.</p> <p> &ldquo;People ask me, &lsquo;why are you running for U.S. Senate?&rsquo;&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I tell them it&rsquo;s for exactly the same reasons I ran for Mayor of Braddock: confronting inequality, whether that&rsquo;s wealth, or income, or even the quality of the air we breathe. The issues as I see them are the issues as I see them, and that&rsquo;s not going to change.&rdquo;</p> <p> At the same time, an important aspect of Fetterman&rsquo;s practical approach to politics is recognizing the need to compromise and set realistic, achievable goals.</p> <p> &ldquo;Am I going to completely change Washington in two years? Absolutely not,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Because it doesn&rsquo;t work like that. When you&rsquo;re one of a hundred senators, you have to be able to work with others. It&rsquo;s all about making positive, incremental changes, rooted in deep principles like those I&rsquo;ve just shared with you today.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fetterman challenged the students to use the skills they&rsquo;ve developed at Heinz to bring about the same kinds of change in other struggling communities as they move forward in their respective careers.</p> <p> &ldquo;Do yourself a favor: drive out to Clairton, or McKeesport, or anywhere in the Mon Valley, and take a look around,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Ask yourself: what would you want to change? How would you want to change it? That&rsquo;s where the answers are going to come.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://johnfetterman.com/" target="_blank">Learn more about John Fetterman &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the Heinz College School of Public Policy and Management &gt;&gt;</a></p>
http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3839Mon, 02 Mar 2016 14:24:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?width=250&mar=1&id=10125John Fetterman's Leadership Journey

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