Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College Takeaways from China, the West, and the Alternative Energy Innovation Challengehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1742]]><p> On June 27<sup>th</sup>, 2014, the Peterson Institute for International Economics convened a panel of economic policy leaders on the global challenge of changing climate.&nbsp; The panel, which included <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=11" target="_blank">Lee Branstetter</a> (Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College), <a href="http://www.epp.cmu.edu/people/bios/morgan.html" target="_blank">M. Granger Morgan</a> (head of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University), and Gilbert E. Metcalf, discussed the technological progress that has been made and the technical challenges that still limit the role of alternative energy in contemporary economies, including recent policy shifts in China, Europe, and the United States that have shaped the pace and trajectory of inventive effort and the impact of current trade disputes on the diffusion of alternative energy technologies.</p> <p> To meet the global challenge of a changing climate, the international community needs both effective promotion of alternative energy innovation and an open trade regime that allows unfettered access to the most cost effective alternative energy solutions from anywhere. Many nations, however, have encountered setbacks in their efforts to promote alternative energy innovation. Simultaneously, serious international trade disputes have arisen in this domain, many involving China, which has emerged as a major producer and exporter of solar and wind power hardware.</p> <p> &nbsp;&ldquo;You could look at that and just say, &lsquo;Oh my lord,&rsquo; give up and go home,&rdquo; said Morgan. &ldquo;The point of showing you this picture is to say that we&rsquo;ve got to get started now. We should have started 20, 30 years ago but if we don&rsquo;t get started the slope of those lines just get steeper and steeper.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got a very serious problem and we need to stop fooling around and get with it, or our children and grandchildren are not going to like the world we leave them.&rdquo;</p> <p> For Branstetter, there were several takeaways from the panel.&nbsp; First, the notion that alternative energy innovation is hard, since innovations will not come quickly or easily.&nbsp; Second, on the importance of advancing technology, Branstetter said, &ldquo;Technology push is not enough &ndash; we need demand pull.&nbsp; The Obama Administration&rsquo;s new carbon rules are a useful start, but much more will be needed to tilt the playing field in favor of low(er) carbon energy.&rdquo;</p> <p> Branstetter&rsquo;s third takeaway suggested that to enhance the competitiveness of alternative energy, we need to maintain open markets for alternative energy hardware.</p> <p> Branstetter, who joined Heinz College in 2006, has a joint appointment with the Department of Social and Decision Sciences, is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves as an associate editor of the Journal of International Economics. From 2011-2012, he served as the Senior Economist for International Trade and Investment for the President&#39;s Council of Economic Advisors. His work has appeared in leading journals including the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the RAND Journal of Economics, and the Journal of International Economics.</p> <p> <br /> Watch the entire panel here:</p> <object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/9TAE2Uiek6A?hl=en_US&amp;version=3"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/9TAE2Uiek6A?hl=en_US&amp;version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1742Mon, 21 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4339photo

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Ramayya Krishnan Reappointed Dean of Heinz Collegehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1743]]><p> This article originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2014/july/july17_krishnanreappointed.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=51">Ramayya Krishnan</a> (right), the W. W. Cooper and Ruth F. Cooper Professor of Management Science and Information Systems, has been appointed to a second five-year term as dean of Carnegie Mellon University&#39;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx">H. John Heinz III College</a>.<br /> <br /> &quot;The Heinz College has done remarkably well this past five years in its educational and research missions, in its linkages to other parts of campus, its student quality, its success in faculty hiring and its fundraising. This, of course, is a credit to the entire Heinz College community, but the intellectual and managerial leadership of Krishnan has been an essential component,&quot; said Nathan Urban, CMU&#39;s interim provost and the Dr. Frederick A. Schwertz Distinguished Professor of Life Sciences.<br /> <br /> Krishnan began his role as dean on July 1, 2009. He has been a member of the Heinz College faculty since 1988 and is a founding faculty member of the <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx">Master of Information Systems Management Program</a>. &quot;I am honored to be reappointed as dean,&quot; Krishnan said. &quot;Heinz College is an extraordinary institution. It has outstanding faculty and staff, highly motivated students and a dedicated group of alumni. I look forward to working with President Suresh, Interim Provost Urban, the leadership team at the university and the entire Heinz College community.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1743Mon, 18 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=2729photo

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Master of Arts Management Student Goes Behind the Curtain at the Tony Awards®http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1741]]><p> When Kimmy Nguyen (MAM &rsquo;14) first started as an Advancement Intern with Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://cfa.cmu.edu/">College of Fine Arts</a> in the fall of 2013, she probably never dreamed that her internship would lead to her hanging out with Lucy Liu at the official after-party of a major entertainment award ceremony and network television broadcast. But that&rsquo;s exactly what happened on June 8, when Kimmy got a behind-the-scenes look at the 2014 <a href="http://www.tonyawards.com/index.html">Tony Awards&reg;</a> at <a href="http://www.radiocity.com/">Radio City Music Hall</a>. &nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;I was one of the aisle captains during the show, which simply required making sure the nominees were seated and in the right seat for the cameramen when their award is being presented,&rdquo; said Nguyen. &ldquo;The actual broadcast was definitely more fast-paced than the dress rehearsal, because it was live and we would have one- or two-minute windows to make sure nominees were seated for their close-ups for each award.&rdquo;</p> <p> In April, Carnegie Mellon entered into a <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/tony-awards/">collaboration with the Tony Awards</a> as its first, exclusive higher education partner. Through her internship with the university, Nguyen had opportunities to work with Tony Productions in a variety of ways. In addition to her work as an aisle captain, Nguyen also helped with the ticketing process in the days leading up to the big show.</p> <p> &ldquo;I found out the general manager of the Tony Productions and his team needed an extra hand, so I came straight to New York not really sure what I was getting into, but open and willing to help out in any way,&rdquo; said Nguyen.</p> <p> That willingness to help paid off in more ways than one. Not only did Nguyen have a fun experience helping out at the show, she also earned an opportunity to work on future projects with Tony Productions. As part of the collaboration between Carnegie Mellon and the Tony Awards, the two organizations will jointly create and launch the first, national recognition program to honor kindergarten through high-school (K-12) theatre educators, and Nguyen will participate in the coordination of that launch as a consultant.</p> <p> In the meantime, she remains thrilled that she was able to enjoy the once-in-a-lifetime experience of being a participant in Broadway&rsquo;s biggest night.</p> <p> &ldquo;I got to go to the gala afterwards, which was held at the Plaza Hotel,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It was really fun to see celebrities, nominees, and winners in a more relaxed setting. And the food and desserts were amazing!&rdquo;</p> <p> Founded in 1987, the Master of Arts Management (MAM) program at Carnegie Mellon University is designed to create innovative leaders in the visual and performing arts. The program combines rigorous finance, marketing, technology, and fundraising coursework with practical experience to prepare students to excel in a public, private or nonprofit arts environment. The MAM degree is offered through a joint partnership between the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx">Heinz College&rsquo;s School of Public Policy &amp; Management</a> and the <a href="http://cfa.cmu.edu/">College of Fine Arts</a>.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1741Mon, 14 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4332photo

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Master of Arts Management Program Hosts 27 National Arts Leaders for Forum on Arts Management Educationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1740]]><p> <a href="retCmsId=188" target="">Master of Arts Management</a> (MAM) Program Director Kathryn Heidemann wanted to assess the degree to which her students utilize the knowledge and skills they acquire during their time at Carnegie Mellon University to make an impact on the field of arts management. So to begin her research, she went directly to some valuable sources: the leaders of influential arts organizations that are shaping the field today.</p> <p> &ldquo;The arts industry is constantly evolving, especially with regards to economic and structural realities, arts participation and engagement, and globalization of the cultural sector,&rdquo; said Heidemann. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s imperative that we continue to address industry shifts and anticipate these shifts before they happen. Although we internally review our program on an ongoing basis through student, faculty and alumni feedback, giving a voice to non-CMU affiliated external arts leaders provides us with an essential, objective point of view which not only tells us how we&rsquo;re doing, but how we&rsquo;re perceived.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img alt="mam_review1" src="image.aspx?id=4329&amp;width=600&amp;height=450" style="float: left; margin: 3px; width: 248px; height: 185px;" />On May 21, the MAM Program hosted 27 national and local arts leaders on campus to share their expertise at a day-long curricular program review. Along with MAM key faculty and staff members, the leaders gathered with a goal of updating knowledge of the needs of the field, reviewing current curriculum for gaps in classroom and experiential learning opportunities for students, refining the program&rsquo;s strategic vision, and discussing new directions in arts leadership as a whole.</p> <p> Program reviewers included senior leaders from the following organizations:</p> <table border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" style="width: 500px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> &bull; Americans for the Arts<br /> &bull; Asian American Arts Alliance<br /> &bull; Association of Performing Arts Presenters<br /> &bull; Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge<br /> &bull; Dance/USA<br /> &bull; EmcArts Inc.<br /> &bull; International Society for the Performing Arts<br /> &bull; League of American Orchestras<br /> &bull; The Metropolitan Museum of Art<br /> &bull; National Arts Strategies<br /> &bull; New York Philharmonic<br /> &bull; Pennsylvania Council on the Arts<br /> &bull; Pomegranate Arts</td> <td> &bull; Roundabout Theatre Company<br /> &bull; Theatre Communications Group<br /> &bull; TRG Arts<br /> &bull; The Andy Warhol Museum<br /> &bull; Arts Consulting Group<br /> &bull; Carnegie Museum of Art<br /> &bull; Children&#39;s Museum of Pittsburgh<br /> &bull; City Theatre<br /> &bull; Elliott Marketing Group<br /> &bull; Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council<br /> &bull; The Heinz Endowments<br /> &bull; Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre<br /> &bull; The Pittsburgh Foundation<br /> &bull; Pittsburgh Opera</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> &ldquo;We are so grateful for the opportunity to receive such valuable feedback from so many esteemed colleagues who not only demonstrate a high level expertise in our field, but also a commitment to the future arts leaders of tomorrow,&rdquo; said Heidemann, who also serves as a board member for the Association of Arts Administration Educators. &ldquo;Ultimately, the outcomes of the session not only benefit our program, but will also have long-term benefits on the arts industry as our alumni disperse to arts organizations across the globe, armed with a skill set that the industry has told us they want.&rdquo;<img align="right" alt="mam_review2" height="186" src="image.aspx?id=4330&amp;width=248&amp;height=186" width="248" /></p> <p> Heidemann said that the program will refer to these recommendations when planning its curriculum for the fall 2014 semester and beyond.</p> <p> &ldquo;We can say with confidence that our program does, indeed, reflect and serve the current systems and practices within the field, in order to best prepare MAM students for their careers in arts industry.&rdquo;</p> <p> Founded in 1987, the Master of Arts Management (MAM) program at Carnegie Mellon University is designed to create innovative leaders in the visual and performing arts. The program combines rigorous finance, marketing, technology, and fundraising coursework with practical experience to prepare students to excel in a public, private or nonprofit arts environment. The MAM degree is offered through a joint partnership between the Heinz College&rsquo;s <a href="retCmsId=28" target="">School of Public Policy &amp; Management</a> and the <a href="http://cfa.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">College of Fine Arts</a>.</p> <p> <img align="middle" alt="mam_review3" height="111" src="image.aspx?id=4331&amp;width=640&amp;height=138" width="515" /></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1740Mon, 11 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4328photo

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MSPPM Alumna Elected City Auditor for Portlandhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1739]]><p> Mary Hull Caballero, a Master of Public Policy Management (MSPPM &rsquo;06) alumna from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, has been elected as City Auditor for Portland, Oregon.&nbsp; As City Auditor, Caballero&rsquo;s office will provide a variety of services, including performance audits, independent reviews of police activities, and other administrative investigations when citizens object to a municipal action taken against them.</p> <p> &ldquo;My fundamental responsibility is to question authority on behalf of the public,&rdquo; said Caballero.&nbsp; &ldquo;I want to use the tools that come with that office to make government work better for the people who pay for it and the people who are served by it.&rdquo;</p> <p> As City Auditor, Caballero says she&rsquo;ll first be focusing on three top priorities -bringing an equity analysis into the work and reports the office is doing, work improving communications with the public, and to be vigilant about protecting the independence of the office.</p> <p> Caballero credits her time and education at Heinz College for preparing her for her current role as City Auditor of Portland.&nbsp; With a focus on quantitative coursework in a supportive environment, Caballero calls Heinz &ldquo;the perfect fit&rdquo; for preparing to take on a leadership role in the public sector.</p> <p> &ldquo;I got everything out of Heinz that I came for and more,&rdquo; said Caballero. &ldquo;I found a supportive environment, challenging coursework, and good people.</p> <p> &ldquo;Heinz increased my understanding of the theoretical foundations of economics, public finance, and urban policy,&rdquo; continued Caballero. &ldquo;It introduced me to a variety of analytical methods, and most important, their shortcomings.</p> <p> Caballero will use her knowledge to lead a staff of 50 employees when she takes office in January 2015.</p> <p> &ldquo;The world needs people who can apply analytical skills to difficult problems and create meaningful solutions,&rdquo; said Caballero.</p> <p> &rdquo;Heinz helped me become one of those people.&rdquo;</p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=134" target="">More info about the MSPPM Priogram &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1739Mon, 09 Jul 2014 11:24:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4325photo

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Alum Sumit Chowdhury On His Career After Heinz and His New Bookhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1738]]><p> Sumit Chowdhury, a Ph.D. alumni (HNZ &rsquo;98) from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, started his career as a consultant with KPMG in 1997 and had a rapid rise to become a Partner in 5 years. He is currently a President with Reliance Jio Infocom. He joined there as the CIO of the new 4G-Broadband start-up of Reliance Industries, one of India&rsquo;s largest business houses.&nbsp; Soon after, he moved to a business-facing role as the President of the Enterprise Business, where he currently looks after the design of the telecom and digital services that will be sold to other businesses and governments.&nbsp; Chowdhury&rsquo;s career has been diverse and he credits his time at Heinz College with getting him to where he is today.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was an extraordinary interdisciplinary program that allowed me to be creative and solve problems in my own way,&rdquo; said Chowdhury.&nbsp; &ldquo;The open and collaborative approach to solving complex problems made for a unique educational experience.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I remember how I enjoyed every course that I took,&rdquo; continued Chowdhury. &ldquo;I fondly remember all my advisors over the years, George Duncan, Stephen Roehrig, Ramayya Krishnan, Rema Padman, Cathleen Karley, David Krackhardt, V Arunachalam and their patient tolerance of my naivety in those days as I matured as an independent thinker&rdquo;.</p> <p> That support led Chowdhury to a great deal of success in his early professional life.&nbsp; Chowdhury has worked in leadership roles in Reliance Industries, IBM, Reliance ADAG, BearingPoint and KPMG in US, Australia and India, as well as supporting various philanthropic causes involving education and children.</p> <p> &ldquo;I have been successful very early in my life because I always make an attempt to see the larger picture and understand the significance of my actions before I do them,&rdquo; said Chowdhury. &ldquo;This requires me to see the forest from the trees and also to look at large problems and structure the unstructured problem. The Ph.D curriculum at Carnegie Mellon has certainly helped in a big way to sharpen this mindset.</p> <p> &ldquo;The multi-disciplinary education at Heinz College always makes me think of bringing in solutions from different domains when I am trying to solve a problem.&rdquo;</p> <p> Chowdhury has used all of his experiences to write his new book, &#39;Rules of the Game&#39;, which was recently released in all the four metros in India, promoted through various industry bodies.</p> <p> &quot;Rules of the Game&quot; is intended for graduating students, young professionals and everyone in the corporate workforce who wants to speed up their career by internalizing certain concepts faster than others. The concepts are discussed using the author&#39;s own experiences and the experiences and insights from many extremely successful professionals captured by spending time through face-to-face interviews and through online interactions asking then what is it that they wished they knew when they were 22 years old.</p> <p> &ldquo;The motivation to write this book came from my interactions with thousands of young professionals who have worked with me in the past and trying to get into their shoes and see that the challenges they were facing in today&rsquo;s hyper-competitive work places,&rdquo; said Chowdhury.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;It is my sincere attempt to make a contribution to the minds of my readers on living their early careers consciously, being aware of the game they are playing and understanding their contribution to the world. &ldquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://sumitchowdhury.com/">More info on Sumit Chowdhury &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.rulesofthegame.in/">More info on &lsquo;Rules of the Game&rsquo; &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/doctoral-program/index.aspx">More info on the Ph.D. Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1738Mon, 01 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4318photo

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John Flaherty Appointed as Distinguished Service Professor and Director of the Heinz College Washington DChttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1737]]><p> Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College announces the appointment of John Flaherty as Distinguished Service Professor of Public Policy and Management and Director of the Heinz College Washington DC.&nbsp; John will provide strategic direction and lead relationship building for the Heinz College in the DC area.&nbsp;He takes over for Robert C. Wilburn, in July, who retires after five years of service to the University.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;We are so pleased to have someone of John&rsquo;s stature leading our team in DC,&rdquo; noted Dean Ramayya Krishnan.&nbsp; &ldquo;John has served in so many capacities in Washington &ndash; on the Hill, in the federal government, for political campaigns and in the private sector and with nonprofits.</p> <p> &ldquo;His ability to work effectively in so many policy areas and across the aisle with a number of stakeholders makes him an ideal leader for our efforts in DC.&rdquo;</p> <p> Flaherty has been at the intersection of public policy, business, and politics for over three decades. His experience in government includes chief of staff roles in both the executive and legislative branches - working with both Republicans and Democrats - at the U.S. Department of Transportation and in the offices of U.S. Representatives Anna Eshoo and Norman Y. Mineta.&nbsp; His private sector experience includes senior positions in Washington DC public affairs firms and Wall Street finance including the Carlyle Group. His foreign policy experience includes participating in official delegations overseas and leading rebuilding teams in both Iraq and Afghanistan.</p> <p> Flaherty will also teach in the Heinz College&rsquo;s Washington-based Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MS-DC) program, which is designed to prepare future public interest leaders to launch their careers in Washington.&nbsp; The MS-DC program combines the highly ranked Heinz College&rsquo;s public policy master&rsquo;s degree with work experience and the opportunity to build networks in the nation&rsquo;s capital. Flaherty&rsquo;s class will bring MS-DC students in direct contact with Washington-based leaders to learn about the realities and challenges of policy making and how top-level decisions get made.</p> <p> &nbsp;&ldquo;I am honored to become a member of such an outstanding college and great university,&rdquo;&nbsp;said Flaherty. &ldquo;I believe CMU is well-positioned to help find solutions for many of the major issues currently challenging policymakers in Washington DC.</p> <p> &ldquo;I look forward to helping Dean Krishnan and the faculty add to the accomplishments of Heinz College.&rdquo;</p> <p> &quot;When you meet John, it is clear that he brings a vast network of contacts and experiences that he can share with our community,&rdquo; said Heinz College Professor Lee Branstetter, who from 2011-12 served in Washington as a Senior Economist at the White House Council of Economic Advisors.&nbsp; &ldquo;But beyond that, I was struck by John&rsquo;s strong motivation and commitment to serving as a mentor and investing in young people. That makes him an exciting choice for us in DC as we look to train thoughtful and impactful policy leaders.&rdquo;</p> <p> Since its establishment in 2008, the MS-DC program has brought more than 125 students to the nation&rsquo;s capital for education and work experiences.</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=2646" target="">Learn more about the MS-DC program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=538" target="_blank">Learn more about John Flaherty &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1737Mon, 26 Jun 2014 10:07:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4314photo

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MEIM Student Excels in Creative Minds Group Competition at Cannes Film Festivalhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1736]]><p> Sarah Whitelocke, a Master of Entertainment Industry Management (MEIM &rsquo;15) from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, made an impressive showing at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival&rsquo;s Creative Minds Group Competition where she won Best Editor and had her group&rsquo;s short film place second overall.<br /> <br /> Creative Minds in Cannes is a film program that provides an opportunity for filmmakers to showcase their work and a platform for students and entry level professionals to connect with companies that can launch their careers.<br /> <br /> Their film, Impression, which Whitelock wrote, directed and edited, is about a celebrity who looses her phone and the young man who finds it. The film deals with the ideas of perception versus reality.<br /> <br /> Whitelocke was originally attracted to Heinz College&rsquo;s MEIM program because of its intense focus on the fundamentals of the screen-based entertainment industry.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;It has far exceeded my expectations,&rdquo; said Whitelocke. &ldquo;I have made life long friends and feel I have found a network of people classmates, teachers, and administrators who want to see me succeed and will do whatever possible to make bring my goals to fruition.<img alt="whitelocke_cannes2" src="image.aspx?id=4300&amp;width=300&amp;height=300" style="float: left; width: 196px; height: 196px; margin: 3px;" /><br /> <br /> &ldquo;It has been challenging, but also extremely rewarding.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> After her success at Cannes, Whitelock is preparing for her summer internships, one at Sundance and another at Wondros.&nbsp; On top of that, she will start work on a short film detailing her experiences growing up in Jamaica.<br /> <br /> Whitelocke attributes her early success to her time in the MEIM program.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;The opportunities Carnegie Mellon and the MEIM program have provided me with are extraordinary,&rdquo; continued Whitelocke.&nbsp; &ldquo;I (now) understand business and economic principles I never thought I would be able to wrap my head around.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;The resources at CMU are endless, and the MEIM program staff&rsquo;s dedication to their students are unparalleled with anything I have experienced before.&ldquo;<br /> <br /> <a href="retCmsId=214" target="">More info on the MEIM program &gt;&gt;</a><br /> <a href="http://www.thecreativemindgroup.com/creative-minds-in-cannes/" target="_blank"><br /> </a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1736Mon, 12 Jun 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4299photo

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Watch Heinz College’s Daniel Nagin Receive the Stockholm Prize Livehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1735]]><p> Daniel Nagin, Associate Dean of Faculty and the Teresa &amp; H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, will be awarded the Stockholm Prize in Criminology on Tuesday, June 10<sup>th</sup>.&nbsp; The ceremony, which will be held at City Hall in Stockholm, Sweden, will be available to be viewed via a live webcast <strong><a href="http://www.criminologysymposium.com/" target="_blank">HERE</a></strong>.</p> <p> The Stockholm Prize in Criminology is awarded for outstanding achievements in criminological research or for the application of research results by practitioners for the reduction of crime and the advancement of human rights.&nbsp; The award will be presented by Sweden&rsquo;s Minister for Justice, Beatrice Ask.</p> <p> Nagin, who will share the award with Stanford University&#39;s Joan Petersilia, is cited for his reviews of evidence for the zero-to-negative effects of prison on those sent to prison helped support the first decline in four decades in the world&rsquo;s highest incarceration rate, providing a clear rationale to invest more in policing than in imprisonment.</p> <p> &ldquo;The crime drop of the past two decades has brought us incalculable benefits in terms of lives saved, freedom to enjoy public spaces and the revitalization of cities,&rdquo; said Nagin. &ldquo;In some countries, however, the costs to society from incarceration and aggressive policing have also been enormously high both in terms of economic cost and human suffering.&rdquo;</p> <p> &quot;Much crime is in response to immediate circumstances &mdash; an angry dispute or unsecured property. Police are a more effective deterrent to crime than lengthy prison sentences to acting on opportunities for crime because their presence is more tangible and direct than a distant sanction,&quot; Nagin continued.</p> <p> Nagin&rsquo;s work lays out policies, like the effective mobilization of resources from both within and outside of the criminal justice system that are known to be effective in preventing in crime in a democratic society. They are intended to serve as an alternative to policies that warehouse more people in prison to no effective end in terms of crime prevention and are also deeply destructive of democratic values.</p> <p> &quot;Professor Dan Nagin&#39;s insightful scientific approach to the study of incarceration has already had impact on one of America&#39;s most pressing social concerns, one that affects individuals, families and government at all levels,&rdquo; said Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh. &ldquo;The Stockholm Prize is a well-deserved recognition of his powerful contributions to his field, and an endorsement of the importance of serious research in criminal justice as a contribution to the social good.&rdquo;</p> <p> Nagin started researching crime as a Ph.D. student at CMU in 1973.</p> <p> &quot;In a serendipitous encounter with Al Blumstein, I asked how long this demographic bulge would affect crime rates,&quot; Nagin said. &quot;Al said he didn&#39;t know, but, in the best tradition of CMU, he said we should try to find out ourselves.</p> <p> &quot;That encounter changed my academic career. I thought I was going to work on health policy. Instead, ever since, I&#39;ve been working on questions related to crime and violence and criminal justice policy.&quot;</p> <p> Blumstein, the J. Erik Jonsson University Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research, received the Stockholm Prize in Criminology in 2007. Nagin is the second Heinz College faculty member to win the award, which was established in 2006.</p> <p> Nagin was also awarded a fellowship by the <a href="http://www.aapss.org/">American Academy of Political and Social Science</a> (AAPSS) this year.&nbsp; Nagin was elected along with six other scholars as 2014 fellows, including U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), at the Newseum in Washington DC this past May 8<sup>th</sup>.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.criminologysymposium.com/" target="_blank">For info on how to watch the Stockholm Prize Award Ceremony &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=69" target="_blank">More info on Dan Nagin &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1735Mon, 06 Jun 2014 11:32:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=3981photo

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CED Hosts Talk on Shale Gas Extractionhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1734]]><p> Last fall the Center for Economic Development at Heinz College&nbsp; welcomed Dr. Jill Kriesky of the Environmental Health Project of Southwestern Pennsylvania for a talk entitled &ldquo;Shale Gas Extraction:&nbsp; Booms, Busts, &amp; Public Health Concerns.&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Dr. Kriesky began her talk by introducing a broad definition of health recognized by the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control, the connection of physical health to the social and economic characteristics of communities, and the limited ability of the healthcare sector to address them.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> She then described some of the oft described positive and negative impacts of the Shale boom for the region.&nbsp; The former includes jobs, lease and royalty income for landowners, fees for the governments, and energy company philanthropy, while the latter includes potential problems with crime, public health, mental health, domestic strife, community disaffection, and deterioration of public infrastructure; along with the fact that small communities in rural areas often have inadequate capacity in place to address these issues.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Dr. Kriesky then noted the collective failure of federal, state, and local governments to install mechanisms to collect information in affected areas to systematically detect the presence and magnitude of problems and to guide response.&nbsp; She then shared example of a study conducted in Canada on shale drilling in the New Brunswick province of Canada which not only evaluated public health impacts but recommended the development and implementation of methods to link health information with socioeconomic data and environmental monitoring, along with the development a of a plan to anticipate and mitigate the &ldquo;Boomtown Effect.&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> She then gave an overview of her organizations mission: to respond to individuals&rsquo; and communities&rsquo; need for access to accurate, timely and trusted public health information and health services associated with natural gas extraction.&nbsp; She next described what her staff is seeing in communities they serve, including common health symptoms and other complaints.&nbsp; Dr. Kriesky then concluded her presentation with a set recommended programs and policies to improve data collection at the local level.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> To learn more about the EHP, click here: <strong><a href="http://www.environmentalhealthproject.org/" target="_blank">http://www.environmentalhealthproject.org/</a></strong></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=942" target=""><strong>Learn more about the CED &gt;&gt;</strong></a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1734Mon, 27 May 2014 10:15:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=3050photo

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MEIM Program Takes the Stage at the 2014 Cannes Film Festivalhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1733]]><p> The 2014 Cannes Festival has begun and Master of Entertainment Industry Program (MEIM) Students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College have already taken to the red carpet. Graduating MEIM student, Taylor Grabowsky, will have his short film &ldquo;The Encounter&rdquo; debut at the festival&rsquo;s Cannes Court M&eacute;trage (Short Film Corner), his second consecutive film to appear at the prestigious festival.</p> <p> Last year was Grabowski&rsquo;s first appearance at the festival as a filmmaker with hisfirst short film, &ldquo;Donor Heart&rdquo;. &nbsp;&ldquo;The Encounter&rdquo; which Taylor wrote, directed, and produced was also made possible with the support of several current MEIM students&nbsp;(Katie O&#39;Leary &#39;14, Judy Liu &#39;14, Laurel Charnetsky &#39;14, Olivia Barton &#39;14, Amar Hansen &#39;14, Divya Joseph &#39;14, Amy Henderson &#39;15, Kris Elder &#39;14, Wenzhao Liu &#39;14, and Jueying Li &#39;14).</p> <p> Taylor will receive a filmmaker accreditation for the Festival de Cannes, priority access to the festival, and his film will be available in the Catalogue du Court. Joining him this year will be 14 first-year MEIM students who will be participating in either the American Pavilion or Creative Minds program at Cannes. This is the largest number of MEIMs to have had participate in the festival experience at Cannes.&nbsp;</p> <p> <img alt="the_encounter" height="198" src="image.aspx?id=4274&amp;width=244&amp;height=330" style="float: left; margin: 3px;" width="145" />&ldquo;We&#39;re all incredibly proud of Taylor,&rdquo; said Daniel Green, Program Director for the MEIM Program.&nbsp;&ldquo;To get two films into Cannes for two consecutive years is quite the accomplishment and we couldn&#39;t be happier with his dedication, talent and focus.&rdquo;</p> <p> Grabowsky&rsquo;s film follows Kathryn, after discovering the cheating ways of her lover, as she finds solace in the kind greeting of another. The burgeoning friendship bears the unmistakable signs of romance. &#39;The Encounter&#39; explores fidelity in the wake of wayward morality, infatuation, and the ultimate pursuit of happiness.</p> <p> &quot;Taylor has always been the type of student who makes things happen,&rdquo; continued Green.&nbsp;&ldquo;Even before he was officially accepted into the Master of Entertainment Industry program, he was already talking about producing and creating films.</p> <p> &quot;He told me that he would be creating films while he&#39;s a MEIM student and he certainly followed up on his word.&quot;</p> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.festival-cannes.com/en.html" target="_blank">More Information About the Cannes Film Festival &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=214" target="">More Information about the MEIM Program &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1733Mon, 16 May 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4273photo

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Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto to Speak at Heinz College’s 2014 Commencementhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1732]]><p> This coming May 17<sup>th</sup> will mark the Commencement Ceremony for Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College&rsquo;s Class of 2014.&nbsp; The Keynote speaker for the ceremony, which will be held at the Petersen Events Center in Pittsburgh, PA, will be Mayor of Pittsburgh, Bill Peduto.</p> <p> Bill Peduto was elected to the office of Mayor of the City of Pittsburgh November 5, 2013.&nbsp; Prior to serving as mayor, he worked for 19 years on Pittsburgh&rsquo;s City Council, as a staffer and Member of Council representing District 8.&nbsp; A self described &ldquo;Reform Democrat&rdquo;, Bill Peduto wrote the most comprehensive package of government reform legislation in Pittsburgh&rsquo;s history. He strengthened the Ethics Code, created the city&rsquo;s first Campaign Finance Limits, established Lobbyist Disclosure and Lobbyist Registration and ended No-Bid Contracts.</p> <p> <img alt="peduto1" src="image.aspx?id=4270&amp;width=1200&amp;height=800" style="float: left; width: 268px; height: 177px; margin: 3px;" />Peduto was a natural choice to speak to the nearly 550 Heinz College graduates this year.&nbsp; In his time as a City Council Member and as Mayor of Pittsburgh, Peduto has been a prime example of working towards good governance through technology. His leadership in green initiatives, economic development, and e-democracy endeavors embodies the spirit of Senator Heinz&rsquo;s legacy.</p> <p> Among Peduto&rsquo;s efforts to further the notion of better government through technology and information is his support of Pittsburgh&rsquo;s Open Data Ordinance, which was proposed by Heinz alumna Councilwoman Natalia Rudiak (MSPPM &rsquo;06). The ordinance not only opens a wealth of information on a new city website for easy access to the public, it also allows the tech community to turn the data into useful apps, and it serves as a benchmark to measure how the city is performing.</p> <p> &quot;Opening up city government&#39;s books and sharing what we know with our workforce, residents and tech community is not only going to benefit everyone in the city but it&#39;s also just the right thing to do. The residents of Pittsburgh own this data, it&#39;s theirs, not ours, and we have an obligation to share it,&quot; said Peduto.</p> <p> Peduto is also a supporter of &ldquo;Smart&rdquo; traffic signals and their implementation throughout the City of Pittsburgh.&nbsp; Working with Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s University Transportation Center, <a href="http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Traffic21</a> and partners in the local foundation community, the city is extending its cutting-edge system of real-time traffic signals that adapt instantly to shifting traffic conditions. A new $1.8 million pilot project will further test and strengthen the Pittsburgh system, providing first-of-its-kind smart traffic technology from the city&rsquo;s eastern edge to nearly Downtown.<img alt="peduto2" src="image.aspx?id=4271&amp;width=1200&amp;height=800" style="float: right; width: 270px; height: 180px; margin: 3px;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Pittsburgh uses its quirks -- in this case a tight urban street grid packed with pedestrians, bikes and commuters -- to make itself great. We don&rsquo;t have the resources to widen roads or buy up properties to solve our traffic issues -- we use brainpower to create efficiency instead,&rdquo; Mayor Peduto said.</p> <p> &ldquo;What also makes Pittsburgh special is the way government works alongside university and private partners to make splashes, such as with this project, that get noticed on the world stage. This is a proud moment for CMU and our city.&rdquo;</p> <p> Peduto is also a champion of green initiatives and legislation as well as being co-creator of iBurgh, the nation&rsquo;s first mobile app for local government. Peduto has led the discussion on e-democracy locally and nationally and has worked with local companies to help them in creating a new industry.</p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=1437" target="">For more information about Heinz College&rsquo;s 2014 Commencement &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1732Mon, 14 May 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4269photo

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Daniel Nagin’s Research Highlighted at AAPSS Fellowship Ceremonyhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1731]]><p> Daniel Nagin, Associate Dean of Faculty and Professor of Public Policy and Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, has been elected as a Fellow by the <a href="http://www.aapss.org/" target="_blank">American Academy of Political and Social Science</a> (AAPSS).&nbsp; <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=69" target="_blank">Nagin</a> was elected along with six other scholars as 2014 fellows, including U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), at the Newseum in Washington DC this past May 8<sup>th</sup>.</p> <p> The AAPSS has dedicated itself to the use of social science to address important social problems. Through theirflagship journal,&nbsp;<em>The </em><em>Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, </em>the AAPSS has brought together public officials and scholars from across disciplines to tackle issues ranging from racial inequality and intractable poverty to the threat of nuclear terrorism.&nbsp; The AAPSS is dedicated&nbsp;to bridging the gap between&nbsp;academic research and the formation of public policy.</p> <p> &ldquo;It is both gratifying and humbling to be included among the ranks of scholars receiving this honor at this event and in the past,&rdquo; said Nagin.</p> <p> Nagin is dedicating the AAPSS award to Thorsten Sellin who was a pioneering criminologist who did path-breaking research that linked public policy to sound science.&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;&ldquo;We&rsquo;re very pleased that each of these extraordinarily accomplished individuals will join the Academy this year,&rdquo; said Douglas Massey, a Princeton sociologist who is President of the AAPSS. &ldquo;Each has made essential contributions to our understanding of how American society functions and whether our public policies act in the common good.</p> <p> &ldquo;They are distinguished public servants and scholars, and we are privileged to have them among us.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img alt="aapss_1" src="image.aspx?id=4302&amp;width=500&amp;height=333" style="float: left; width: 350px; height: 233px; margin: 3px;" />Nagin developed a statistical methodology called group-based trajectory modeling that has revolutionized the study of data that track individual development over time. Application of the method to these data has made clear that the developmental origins of criminal and violent behavior can be traced to very early in life. This finding underscores the importance of early interventions into the lives of children at high risk of following developmental trajectories that contribute to violence in adolescence and beyond.</p> <p> Nagin&rsquo;s work in developmental trajectories of offenders and offending behavior has shaped the way criminologists and criminal justice practitioners think about offending &ldquo;careers.&rdquo; Further, his long-standing work on deterrence continues to challenge conventional wisdom and advancing understanding of what is or is not effective and why.</p> <p> The research done by Nagin also looks at effectiveness of sentencing versus apprehension that is the more effective deterrent, not the certainty of punishment.</p> <p> &ldquo;Conventional wisdom is that the certainty of punishment, not its severity, is the more effective deterrent,&rdquo; said Nagin. &ldquo;Evidence, though, gives us the correct form of the &ldquo;certainty principle&rdquo;: the certainty of <em>apprehension,</em> not the severity of the ensuing consequences, is the effective deterrent.</p> <p> &ldquo;This conclusion has two important policy implications: First, it makes clear the fallacy of claims that punishments such as mandatory minimum sentencing deter crime,&rdquo; continued Nagin.</p> <p> &ldquo;There is simply no evidence that increasing the risk of imprisonment post-apprehension and conviction serves as a deterrent.&rdquo;</p> <p> Nagin&rsquo;s research not only increases the effectiveness of crime policy, it also has far-reaching side effects that go along with a drop in crime.</p> <p> &ldquo;The crime drop of the past two decades has brought us incalculable benefits in terms of lives saved, freedom to enjoy public spaces and the revitalization of cities, but the costs to society over incarceration and aggressive policing are also enormously costly,&rdquo; said Nagin.<img alt="aapss_2" src="image.aspx?id=4303&amp;width=300&amp;height=200" style="float: right; width: 300px; height: 200px; margin: 3px;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;It is important that we implement policies that prevent crime rather than warehouse more people in prison to no effective end.&rdquo;</p> <p> The AAPSS inducts a handful of Fellows each year in recognition of their contributions to the improvement of society through research and influence over public policy.&nbsp; Since the founding of its Fellows program in 2000, AAPSS has inducted 93 distinguished scholars and public servants as Fellows.&nbsp;</p> <p> Nagin was also awarded the Stockholm Prize in Criminology in October, which will be presented to him next month.</p> <p> <em>Photos courtesy of Paul Morigi.</em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1731Mon, 09 May 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4301photo

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Emily Rentschler on Receiving the William W. and Ruth F. Cooper Fellowshiphttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1729]]><p> Emily Rentschler is a second-year student in H. John Heinz III College&rsquo;s Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM) program, a Reserve Army Officer for the United States Army, and a recipient of the 2013-2014 William W. and Ruth F. Cooper Fellowship, Scholarship and Student Aid.</p> <p> Originally from Durham, New Hampshire, Emily attended Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania for her bachelor&rsquo;s degree. She graduated with a degree in economics, minors in international relations and French, and as a distinguished military graduate and Mortar Board Scholar. Emily went on to serve as an intelligence officer and captain for the U.S. Army in South Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan and the United States, where she directed research and analysis of intelligence information and trained soldiers in various analytical skills and procedures.</p> <p> When Emily began her graduate school search shortly after returning from her deployment in Afghanistan, she was immediately drawn to Heinz College. &ldquo;The interdisciplinary and case-learning methodology at Heinz both suited my learning style and best prepared me for future endeavors. As a self-identified problem solver, I was particularly drawn to the opportunity to participate in a capstone project working on a real-world problem.&rdquo; Generous donor support made these learning opportunities possible for Emily.&nbsp;</p> <p> <img align="right" alt="rentschler_blockquote" height="104" src="image.aspx?id=4258&amp;width=544&amp;height=250" width="228" />William W. Cooper, the first dean of Heinz College, and his wife Ruth, an attorney, created the William W. and Ruth F. Cooper Fellowship, Scholarship and Student Aid to provide critical financial support to Heinz College students. Each year, this fellowship helps Heinz students pursue their studies and sets an example for students and alumni to give back to the college.</p> <p> At Heinz College, Emily has learned numerous skills in the classroom and reinforced them in real-world situations. In her capstone systems synthesis project, she conducted a cost-benefit analysis of increasing bicycle ridership in Pittsburgh to 10 percent. By comparing the costs of developing the infrastructure to support additional riders with the savings and environmental and health benefits of more riders, Emily was able to apply the skills she learned in previous courses at Heinz while supporting local non-profit BikePGH. Her projects and involvement with Heinz have helped her make connections with members of the Pittsburgh community that will help her in a future career as a policy analyst.</p> <p> Your support of Heinz initiatives and students can help bring leaders with unique experiences and backgrounds, like Emily, to Heinz College. This diversity in our community improves the learning environment for students, and boosts the Heinz College&rsquo;s reputation as a leader in the fields of information systems, public policy and management. <a href="https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1410/giving/form_hdr.aspx?sid=1410&amp;gid=1&amp;pgid=1890&amp;cid=3312&amp;appealcode=A1300">Please make your gift today</a>.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1729Mon, 02 May 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4257photo

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