Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College Carnegie Mellon Professor Acquisti Awarded Fellowship from Carnegie Corporation of New Yorkhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1776]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/march/joel-tarr-honored.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> <em>Renowned Privacy Researcher One of Only 32 Recipients of Prestigious Honor</em></p> <p> PITTSBURGH&mdash;Carnegie Mellon University Professor Alessandro Acquisti was named today to the inaugural class of the Andrew Carnegie Fellows by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.</p> <p> Acquisti is one of only 32 recipients of the fellowship and was selected from more than 300 nominees.</p> <p> A noted economist and privacy researcher, Acquisti&rsquo;s fellowship will investigate the impact of the data economy on societal welfare and the distribution of wealth, focusing on how the erosion of privacy and how the rise of &ldquo;big data&rdquo; may affect economic growth, equality, and discrimination.</p> <p> &ldquo;I&rsquo;m pleased to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow and excited to have the opportunity to further explore the possible economic effects of the data economy through this fellowship,&rdquo; said Acquisti, associate professor of information technology and public policy at CMU&rsquo;s Heinz College. &ldquo;It is quite likely that the expanding collection, analysis, and use of large amounts of individuals&rsquo; data will bring about both positive and negative consequences for different stakeholders, and my research will explore those impacts. I thank the Carnegie Corporation for this wonderful honor.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p> <p> Acquisti&rsquo;s research investigates the economics and behavioral economics of privacy, including privacy in online social networks. His studies have been published in leading journals across diverse disciplines, including science, information technology, consumer research and marketing. Acquisti&rsquo;s 2009 study on the predictability of social security numbers received international media attention. Two years after the study, the Social Security Administration changed the assignment scheme of Social Security numbers.</p> <p> &ldquo;Alessandro&rsquo;s groundbreaking work on Privacy and its impact on society are representative of the kind of work that you will see here at the Heinz College. I am very pleased that he is named the Andrew Carnegie Fellow by the prestigious Carnegie Corporation of New York&rdquo;, said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean, CMU&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College. &nbsp;</p> <p> Carnegie Corporation is awarding up to $200,000 to each fellow, which will enable them to take sabbaticals to devote time to their research and writing. The fellowship program provides support for scholars in the social sciences and humanities and aims to provide new perspectives on the program&rsquo;s overarching theme for 2015: Current and Future Challenges to U.S. Democracy and International Order. Winning proposals address issues including policing and race, big data and privacy, the impact of the aging population and the safety of generic drugs, among other topics.&nbsp;</p> <p> <em><strong>Alessandro Acquisti (pictured above) is an Associate Professor of Information Systems and Public Policy at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University. His research investigates the economics and behavioral economics of privacy, and privacy in online social networks.</strong></em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1776Mon, 22 Apr 2015 00:20:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6741photo

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MAM Alumni Panel Focuses on Community Development and the Artshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1762]]><p> There&rsquo;s no doubt that the arts and artistic expression can do many great things.&nbsp; The arts can unite and they allow people to express themselves and to communicate in unexpected and effective ways.&nbsp;</p> <p> But can the arts promote measurable change within entire communities?</p> <p> The Master of Arts Management Program helped students explore that reality last month when they put together a special panel as part of their monthly speaker series featuring 4 MAM alumni who consistently strive to strengthen their communities in Pittsburgh, PA through the arts.</p> <p> The panel included:</p> <p> - Tirzah deCaria (MAM &rsquo;10)&ndash; Co-Director of <a href="http://www.citizenstudios.org/" target="_blank">Creative Citizen Studios</a>, who also served as moderator for the panel</p> <p> - Alecia Shipman Young (MAM &rsquo;10)&ndash; Youth Arts Liaison for the <a href="http://manchesterbidwell.org/replication/national-center-for-arts-and-technology/" target="_blank">National Center for the Arts &amp; Technology</a></p> <p> - Ayisha A. Morgan-Lee (MAM &rsquo;07) &ndash; Founder, CEO &amp; Artistic Director of the <a href="http://www.5678hdat.org/" target="_blank">Hill Dance Academy Theater</a></p> <p> - Michelle Clesse (MAM &rsquo;10) &ndash; Communications and Development Manager for the <a href="http://www.unionproject.org/" target="_blank">Union Project</a></p> <p> Each panelist brought with them their unique professional experience with community building through the arts.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="mam_panel2" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6598&amp;width=300&amp;height=200" />deCaria and Creative Citizens Studios seeks to build bridges between the arts community and disability communities, by offering accessibility training programs for cultural organizations, teaching life-skill building arts classes&nbsp;and&nbsp;creating community engagement through arts programs within human service provider organizations.<br /> <br /> Young and The National Center for Arts &amp; Technology, a part of the Manchester Bidwell Corporation, operates under the notion that &ldquo;art changes lives.&rdquo; As Youth Liaison, Young helps develop arts programs for communities where poverty is major issue.&nbsp; Participants in NCAT programs continually achieve a 99% graduation rate later in life.</p> <p> Morgan-Lee&rsquo;s Hill Dance Academy Theater (HDAT) is devoted to developing and training dancers in Black dance traditions, expanding knowledge and contributions of Black Dance traditions and create emerging dance artists who will sustain Black dance in the Black community.</p> <p> As Communications and Development Manager for the Union Project, Clesse helps evolve the projects mission of creating a neighborhood space where people could come together to connect, create, and celebrate.&nbsp; The Union Project continually strives to use art as the means of finding creative solutions to improve the community.</p> <p> &ldquo;The alumni&rsquo;s enthusiasm for their work was infectious,&rdquo; said Nora Ames Fleury, a MAM &rsquo;15 student.&nbsp; &ldquo;It was inspiring to hear the impact MAM alums are making in the Pittsburgh community and see how fulfilled and happy they are five to eight years out of the program.&rdquo;</p> <p> Each of the panelists agreed that people were at the core of what they do.</p> <p> &ldquo;You&rsquo;ve got to listen and know your community in order to create change,&rdquo; said Morgan-Lee.<img align="" alt="mam_panel3" class="right" src="image.aspx?id=6599&amp;width=300&amp;height=200" /></p> <p> &ldquo;You have to be aware of the landscape of the arts in your city,&rdquo; added Young.&nbsp; &ldquo;You need to listen and incorporate the community into what you do.&rdquo;</p> <p> Clesse agreed and added that you needed to work with your &ldquo;Board of Neighbors&rdquo;.</p> <p> However, making change in communities can still have its share of difficulties. From tracking and measuring change, to the misconceptions of non-involved community members and the inherent challenges of running an arts program; change, while possible, is rarely easy to come by.</p> <p> &ldquo;Leadership,&rdquo; said Young, &ldquo;Leadership can be the biggest roadblock to change.&nbsp; Individuals are not always available to lead these initiatives in communities.</p> <p> &ldquo;Some projects can&rsquo;t continue because the right leader has not emerged.&rdquo;</p> <p> They all agreed that the MAM program is what prepared them with the leadership abilities they needed for the challenges they face.</p> <p> &ldquo;I use a lot of the knowledge I learned (at Heinz) in my day-to-day,&rdquo; said Clesse.&nbsp; &ldquo;The knowledge you learn here is exactly what you need to leverage what you&rsquo;ll learn as you grow professionally.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;The presentations, the evaluations, the database training,&rdquo; said Young, &ldquo;it all becomes invaluable in your career.&rdquo;</p> <p> Morgan-Lee concluded with a sentiment that all of the alumni enthusiastically agreed with.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re doing successfully as MAM alumni and we love what we do.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=188" target="">More information on the Master of Arts Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1762Mon, 14 Apr 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6596photo

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Heinz College Project Shines a Spotlight on Blight at the Fels National Policy ChallengeNewhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1775]]><p> A cross-disciplinary team of students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College were recently chosen as finalists at the Fels National Public Policy Challenge for their unique approach to tackling the issue of blight. Their project, The Wilkinsburg Vacant Home Tour, will showcase abandoned properties, leading tour participants on a journey back in time through the narratives of historic buildings in Wilkinsburg, located near Pittsburgh, PA.</p> <p> The Vacant Home Tour, which takes place on May 9<sup>th</sup> in Wilkinsburg, will feature stories of the families and the people who lived and worked in the homes. The memories of these homes will map out their historical impact in creating the communities and neighborhoods in which they exist.&nbsp; The aim, through the tour, is to increase interest in these vacant homes and find the properties new owners.</p> <p> Community members from the neighborhood will be engaged to serve as Tour Docents, greeting participants at each stop along the tour and helping to further reveal the forgotten stories of these properties. Tour participants will be provided with a &ldquo;tour kit&rdquo; which will offer them the tools that will help them visualize what the house once looked like in full vibrancy, a tour map that will work hand-in-hand with the visual prompts along the tour route, additional background information on each of the properties, and information on resources available to aid participants in more actively engaging these homes and buildings.</p> <p> &ldquo;It has been a pleasure working with the Vacant Home Tour team,&rdquo; said David Lassman, Distinguished Service Professor of Organizational Management at Heinz College. &ldquo;The team has developed an innovative solution to a very visible and expensive problem: &nbsp;urban blight.&nbsp; This grass-roots project relies heavily on community stakeholders, especially citizens, to both plan and implement.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;They are passionate about the project and committed to the work,&ldquo; added Lassman.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="vacant_home_tour" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6729&amp;width=350&amp;height=453" style="width: 350px; height: 453px;" />&ldquo;We want people to look at them, not as problems, but as spaces with potential meant to be engaged with in positive ways,&rdquo; said Kenneth Chu, a member of the student team.</p> <p> &ldquo;Our program intends to change the perception of blight while at the same time connecting new residents with old-timers in the neighborhood of Wilkinsburg,&rdquo; said team member Eleni Katrini about the project. &ldquo;The Fels Challenge was a great opportunity to showcase the program we have been working on since September to a national audience.&rdquo;</p> <p> The National Invitational Public Policy Challenge, hosted by the Fels Institute of Government at the University of Pennsylvania in association with Governing Magazine, is an unparalleled opportunity for students to learn, connect, and serve. The competition challenges student teams to develop a policy proposal and civic campaign plan to achieve significant change in their communities, making it a perfect forum for the Vacant Home Tour.</p> <p> &ldquo;I believe that an event like the Fels Challenge is a great opportunity for students to feel motivated to work on public policy problems and come up with innovative ideas,&rdquo; added Katrini. &ldquo;Most of the ideas presented at the event were dealing with social issues and were using policy, technology, design and services to tackle with the problems at hand.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was an opportunity for us to contextualize our work with what other policy makers, current and future are doing, to share with them the work of students from Carnegie Mellon University, and to compare notes on current and future trends, challenges, and hopes in social innovation,&rdquo; said Chu.&nbsp; &ldquo;There were public officials, public administrators, and leaders of non-profit organizations in attendance, and their feedback and advice on our work were invaluable to making the Vacant Home Tour a more effective program.&ldquo;</p> <p> For more information on the upcoming Vacant Home Tour on Saturday May 9<sup>th</sup>, visit <a href="http://www.vacanthometour.com" target="_blank">www.vacanthometour.com</a>, <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Vacant-Home-Tour/565183226918550?fref=ts" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/pages/Vacant-Home-Tour/565183226918550?fref=ts</a> or contact <a href="mailto:vacanthometour@gmail.com">vacanthometour@gmail.com</a>.</p> <p> <em>(Above pictured from left to right: Rene Cuenca, Karlee Turkaly, Shawneil Campbell, Eleni Katrini, and Kenneth Chu)</em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1775Mon, 02 Apr 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6728photo

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Joel Tarr Wins Distinguished Service Awardhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1774]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/march/joel-tarr-honored.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/tarr.html">Joel Tarr</a>, who has spent his career studying the environmental history of cities and the history and impact of their technological systems, was awarded the 2015 Distinguished Service Award by the <a href="http://aseh.net/">American Society for Environmental History</a> (ASEH).</p> <p> The ASEH gives the award each year to an individual who has contributed significantly to the development of the organization. Tarr received the award at the society&rsquo;s annual conference in Washington, D.C., on March 21.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/acker.html">Caroline Acker,</a> head of the <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/">Department of History</a> in the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/">Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences</a>, said that the field of environmental history is on the rise as issues like climate change and global warming take on urgency. She believes Tarr&#39;s work has been critical.</p> <p> &ldquo;Joel was a pioneer in environmental history that brought cities into environmental studies. Environmental history is one of the most dynamic areas of history today and Joel&#39;s research into the infrastructure development that knitted cities into systems is one of the reasons,&rdquo; Acker said.</p> <p> Tarr, the Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy in the History Department, has additional appointments in the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx">H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management</a> and the <a href="http://www.epp.cmu.edu/">Department of Engineering and Public Policy</a>. A CMU faculty member since 1967, he has received numerous other honors, including the Society for the History of Technology&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.historyoftechnology.org/awards/davinci.html">Leonardo da Vinci Medal</a>. The society&#39;s highest honor, the da Vinci medal goes to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the history of technology through research, teaching, publication and other activities. He also received CMU&rsquo;s Robert Doherty Prize for Educational Leadership in 1991.</p> <p> Tarr has served on National Research Council committees dealing with issues of urban infrastructure, public transit and water pollution. He was president of the Public Works Historical Society in 1982-83 and president of the Urban History Association in 1999.</p> <p> &ldquo;I am deeply honored to receive this award from the American Society of Environmental History,&rdquo; Tarr said. &ldquo;I am especially proud of the fact that this award, as well as the other awards I have received from the professional organizations in the specialties of technological and urban history, reflects the interdisciplinary orientation I have absorbed at Carnegie Mellon. It has been a privilege to be at this university for these many years.&rdquo;</p> <p> For more information on Tarr, visit <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/tarr.html">http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/tarr.html</a>.</p> <p> <em><strong>Joel Tarr (pictured above), the Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy in the History Department, has spent his career studying the environmental history of cities and the history and impact of their technological systems.</strong></em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1774Mon, 28 Mar 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6724photo

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MEIM Student Designs Promotional Images for Maroon 5http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1772]]><p> Second year MEIM Julia Wu has been interning at Career Artist Management (CAM) since the fall semester. The music management company, located in Beverly Hills, has an impressive roster of about 20 artists including Maroon 5, Adam Levine, Hinder, Robin Thicke, Macy Gray, and Better Than Ezra, among others. So how did Julia end up designing promo images for Maroon 5?</p> <p> &ldquo;I work with the Director of Social Media and Digital Marketing. <img alt="Julia Wu MEIM 2015" class="left" src="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/image.aspx?id=6680&amp;width=100&amp;height=163" />My main job is to design promotional imagery for our clients&#39; activities, whether that be one-sheets or social media images. Maroon 5 is our biggest account and I&#39;ve been designing a lot of tour promos for social media. It&#39;s a really chill place and it&#39;s nice that they trust me enough to grant me a lot of creative freedom for my designs. It&#39;s really rewarding to see something you designed get so many Likes or Favorites on social media.&rdquo;</p> <p> Julia has loved her time at CAM and her internship has been a great learning experience. Click on the links to see some of Julia&rsquo;s work.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152870053618482/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152870053618482/?type=3&amp;theater</a></p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/a.10150138876298482.302819.5330548481/10153077762273482/?type=1&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/a.10150138876298482.302819.5330548481/10153077762273482/?type=1&amp;theater</a></p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152849843183482/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152849843183482/?type=3&amp;theater</a></p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152812282238482/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152812282238482/?type=3&amp;theater</a></p> <p> - By Julia Wu (MEIM 2015)</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1772Mon, 24 Mar 2015 15:47:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6700photo

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Paterson Produces First Filmhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1773]]><p> Jonny Paterson (MEIM 12) is in the middle of post production on his first film, Halfway. Executive Produced with former NFL star Nnamdi Asomugha (&quot;Beasts of No Nation&quot;), Frequent MEIM Guest Speaker, Tommy Oliver, and MEIM Faculty member Jonathan Baker, the film shot for 30 days in WI this past fall. MEIMLAND caught up with Jonny about the film.</p> <p> <strong>How did you first get involved with HALFWAY?</strong><br /> &ldquo;The writer of HALFWAY, Ben Caird, was a close friend of mine and someone with whom I had been developing another feature film project with, when the idea of me producing HALFWAY first arose. HALFWAY wasn&#39;t available when we first met as there were other producers circling it. I always liked the material and he knew that. He began to get frustrated at the lack of progress with other potential stakeholders and asked me if I wanted to produce it for him. However it only made sense for both of us if I was able to bring certain tangibles to the table, otherwise I would essentially be just another producer letting him down. I knew Quinton Aaron from a feature called 1982, which I worked on with fellow CMU alumnus, Tommy Oliver (HS &#39;06). Tommy wrote, directed and produced that project and was kind enough to give me my first on-set experience as a PA. I knew that if I could get Quinton on HALFWAY then the project would grow in stature and potential. Tommy set up the meeting, Ben and I pitched Quinton and by the end of lunch he was on board as our lead actor. Both Tommy and Quinton are also Executive Producers on the film.&rdquo;</p> <p> <strong>Do you have any advice for aspiring film producers that you wish you had known when you started?</strong><br /> &ldquo;I have learned a great deal throughout this process, but one thing I would reinforce is that everything you are taught about how difficult it is and how challenging it is to get your first movie made is TRUE. It&#39;s not just the &#39;bringing everything together&#39;, it&#39;s the mental strain and ability to handle the ups and downs that make it such a trying profession. You need to be self-confident and back yourself to the hilt. That being said, this should absolutely be a motivating factor as opposed to a disillusioning one. If you want to be a producer then you simply have to go out and produce.. I had the support of various people - my family, my friends, mentors such as Tommy Oliver and former professors such as Jonathan Baker (also an Executive Producer of HALFWAY). Take every class and stay in touch with all your professors. Your experiences at Sundance and SXSW should be pillars of your CMU experience. Networking opportunities like those are few and far between. Try and get into the office of a film producer and learn from them first hand. I worked for (MEIM professor) Paula Wagner for a year and credit her a great deal with helping me realize I wanted to be a producer. Working for Paula taught me that for an independent producer, every hour is different with a new set of challenges and a new set of things to measure a successful day by. Also - get people to like you, that&#39;s vital. Nobody is going to make it happen for you, but you are absolutely going to want that support network to help capitalize on your hard work and realize your potential.</p> <p> <strong>What are you currently working on, and do you have any films in the pipeline that we should look forward to?</strong><br /> &ldquo;I&#39;m in post production on HALFWAY. Editing a feature film is a long and arduous process, but I&#39;m learning a great deal doing it for the first time. Hopefully, the movie is good and it opens doors for me (which it already seems to be doing). In terms of what&#39;s next, I have an Irish set project (I&#39;m from Scotland) that I&#39;ve starting raising money for and attaching actors to. It&#39;s called THE SCAVENGERS and the screenplay was on the Hollywood Blacklist. I&#39;ve also written a TV pilot that I&#39;d love to get made. Ultimately I just need to keep going. The advice I got during the HALFWAY process is &#39;don&#39;t, under any circumstances, give up&#39; and I intend to follow that&rdquo;.</p> <p> - By Becca Nadler (MEIM 2015)</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1773Mon, 24 Mar 2015 16:02:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6701photo

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CMU Student Wins Big at National Health Policy Debate Competitionhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1771]]><p> Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Christophe Combemale, a student in Heinz College&rsquo;s accelerated master&rsquo;s program, was part of the winning team at the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs and Administration&rsquo;s&nbsp; (NASPAA) inaugural student simulation competition.</p> <p> The competition, held at the University of Maryland, was a daylong event that brought together graduate students from NASPAA schools&nbsp;to analyze a current&nbsp;health policy problem, with the direction of providing a locally led &ldquo;bottom up&rdquo; approach to reform, and present their solutions to a panel of judges.&nbsp;</p> <p> A total of 45 teams, representing 93 schools, entered the competition, but it was the team from the National Capital Region, which included Combemale (DC&rsquo;15, MSPPM&rsquo;16). As part of the accelerated program, Combemale is also completing his bachelor&rsquo;s degree in ethics, history and public policy in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.</p> <p> The competition featured a simulation model which required students to apply the skills they have learned in the classroom, implement systems thinking and to showcase their leadership, critical thinking, and collaborative decision making skills. The simulation created a hypothetical mid-sized town in Middle America in need of health care solutions.</p> <p> Combemale and his team, which included Nomzana Augustin (Johns Hopkins University), Zachary Blackburn (University of Virginia), and Mark Rucci (University of Delaware), showed exemplary understanding of health care challenges and current policy concerns, as well as a display of sophisticated reasoning to craft composite and easy-to-implement policies that benefit health care for the long-term.</p> <p> &ldquo;Throughout the entire challenge we came back to the issue of funding,&rdquo; said Combemale about the 4-phase challenge.&nbsp; &ldquo;In the simulation, we were tasked with improving productivity and increasing the quality, access, cost and supply of health care and every time we looked at our initiatives we found that funding was the main limiting factor.&rdquo;</p> <p> Addressing the problem of how to pay for their initiatives was one of the major factors leading to the team&rsquo;s success.&nbsp; They switched their focus to programs that led to cost savings, such as preventative care, and used those savings to pay for more initiatives.</p> <p> &ldquo;It really was this layering of initiatives that helped us succeed,&rdquo; added Combemale.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="NASPAA_Group" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6689&amp;width=350&amp;height=233" style="width: 350px; height: 233px;" />Combemale highlighted the varying skill sets of the people on his team, which led to quick and thoughtful solutions to the problems presented in the challenge.</p> <p> &ldquo;Everyone&rsquo;s skills and their passion for the subject matter was really wonderful,&rdquo; said Combemale. &ldquo;We all brought something unique to the table, discussed every plan, and our high level of cooperation made sure everyone was well versed in the decisions we made&rdquo;</p> <p> Combemale added that the skills he brought to the challenge were very much influenced by his education at Carnegie Mellon University.</p> <p> &ldquo;As a Heinz College student, I really do have an appreciation for numbers and quantitative reasoning,&rdquo; said Combemale.&nbsp; &ldquo;That background is what helped lead to the insight about our reinvestment plan.</p> <p> &ldquo;At CMU, I&rsquo;ve had the opportunity to take a great selection of courses in diverse fields that has enabled me to see how phenomena interact with each other.&rdquo;</p> <p> According to officials at NASPAA, &ldquo;the team understood the technical model, but instead of trying to obtain the highest score on the model, they aligned their thought process with stakeholder concerns and the current policy environment to affect actual change.</p> <p> &ldquo;They made sophisticated tradeoffs that would allow their policies to be organizationally and politically feasible.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team arrived at a solution that, if scaled to a national level, would save the U.S. $229 billion dollars annually in 2040 for a cumulative savings of $3.25 trillion U.S. dollars between 2015 and 2040. In addition, the team&#39;s solution yielded $930 million U.S. dollars in increased productivity in the economy due to fewer sick days taken.&nbsp; All of this took place while the population became healthier: death rates dropped by 12.7 percent, emergency room visits dropped by 19.4 percent and high risk behaviors such as obesity, smoking and drug abuse dropped by 18.7 percent in the simulated scenario.</p> <p> However, Combemale wasn&rsquo;t the only Carnegie Mellon University representative at the competition.&nbsp; Tamara Alkhattar, a Master of Public Management student (MPM &rsquo;17), was a member of the winning Northeast Region team in the Regional Competition.</p> <p> NASPAA is the global standard in public service education with a twofold mission to ensure excellence in education and training for public service and to promote the ideal of public service. It is the membership organization of graduate education programs in public policy, public affairs, public administration, and public and nonprofit management. NASPAA is also the recognized accreditor of master&#39;s degree programs in these fields. Its nearly 300 members are located across the U.S. and in 14 countries around the globe.</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=28" target="">More info about the MSPPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1771Mon, 17 Mar 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6688photo

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Lowell Taylor Co-Authors Article on The Impact of the Great Migration on the Mortality of African Americanshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1770]]><p> <em>&ldquo;It occurred to me that no matter where I lived, geography could not save me.&rdquo;<br /> ― Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America&#39;s Great Migration</em></p> <p> The Great Migration, the massive migration of African Americans out of the rural South to largely urban locations in the North, Midwest, and West that started in the early twentieth century, was a landmark event in US history.&nbsp; The Great Migration was one of the most rapid mass movements in history, as millions of African Americans headed out of the South in order to find better opportunities and a better life.</p> <p> However, a new paper co-authored by Heinz College&rsquo;s Lowell Taylor, shows that the Great Migration actually led to an increase in the mortality of African Americans born in the early twentieth century South. The paper makes this inference through analysis that uses proximity of birthplace to railroad lines as an instrument for migration.</p> <p> Taylor&rsquo;s paper, &ldquo;The Impact of the Great Migration on Mortality of African Americans: Evidence from the Deep South,&rdquo; published this month in the <em>American Economic Review</em>, found an alarming jump in mortality rates for African Americans who headed north.&nbsp; The authors believe they are the first to discover this link between the Great Migration and increased mortality.</p> <p> &ldquo;We started to think about the lifetime consequences of heading north, and how to measure them,&rdquo; said Taylor.&nbsp; &ldquo;Our goal was to provide a credible answer to the question: &lsquo;What would have happened if you hadn&rsquo;t moved north?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p> One of the challenges facing Taylor and his co-authors was the fact that migrating North was something individuals chose to do, and those who made that choice might have been systematically different than those who remained in the South.</p> <p> &ldquo;Fortunately, the historical experience provided us with a sort of natural experiment,&rdquo; continued Taylor. &ldquo;We were able to find two groups of people who were roughly identical, one group that migrated and one that did not.&nbsp; The innovative idea was use the location of railways in the early 20<sup>th</sup> Century as the factor that essentially randomized people into the two groups.&nbsp; African Americans who were born in railway towns were much more likely to migrate than those who were not.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s like the railways formed the experiment for our paper.&rdquo;</p> <p> Using this unique analysis of African Americans who moved north as a consequence of being born near a railway versus African Americans who did not, the team was able to find fascinating insights about the economic and health outcomes of migrants for the paper.</p> <p> &ldquo;Health outcomes are really one of the primary indicators of lifetime well-being,&rdquo; said Taylor.&nbsp;</p> <p> &quot;We thought what we would find was that migration north extended life and made the African-American population healthier,&quot; said Seth Sanders, a Duke University economist and one of the study&#39;s co-authors. &quot;We actually found exactly the opposite. Urban life is stressful. Being away from your roots is probably stressful.&quot;</p> <p> The economic and historical literature about the Great Migration, which absolutely was a means for improving economic opportunities among African Americans, also emphasizes that African Americans often faced daunting circumstances in the North, including, according to the paper, &ldquo;high costs in discriminatory housing markets and uneven employment prospects.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Real economic gains to moving North may have been modest or non-existent for many African Americans, thus attenuating improved health prospects associated with increasing prosperity.&rdquo;</p> <p> In other words, the health benefits of economic and social improvement were outweighed by other longevity damaging factors, such as an increase in smoking and alcohol consumption, which then led to large increases in cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, and cirrhosis.</p> <p> The damage was so great that mortality rates for migrants had a 40% increase for African American men and a 50% increase for African American women.</p> <p> The paper&rsquo;s findings suggest a new layer of complication for the vast literature that evaluates links between health and location, education, income, and race, in the United States. The authors also believe that their research may be relevant for evaluating current trends in developing countries, many of which are experiencing extraordinary levels of migration from rural areas to urban centers.</p> <p> The authors&rsquo; assessment of the long-term consequences of the Great Migration suggests that dislocation due to migration might have substantial costs in terms of individual health.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.20120642" target="_blank">Read the Article on the American Economic Review &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1770Mon, 12 Mar 2015 10:07:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6715photo

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Heinz Alumnus Drives Policy with Arts and Educationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1765]]><p> The primary goal of any policy leader is to bring about effective and lasting change.&nbsp; However, the engine that drives that change is unique depending on the leader and the challenges they face.&nbsp; For Andres-Webster Henestrosa, a Master of Arts Management (MAM &rsquo;97) and a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management Alumnus (MSPPM &rsquo;97), the engine of change was not hard to find.</p> <p> As the Cultural Attach&eacute; for the Consulate of Mexico in Los Angeles, Webster-Henestrosa uses education and the arts of his culture to drive policy.</p> <p> Webster-Henestrosa&rsquo;s path is an intriguing one as he went from graduate school at Heinz College to working in a consulate in the second-largest city in the US.&nbsp; After getting his MAM and MSPPM degrees from Heinz College, he went back to Mexico and worked as an analyst in the Economic and Social Studies Department of Banamex, one of the most important financial groups in Mexico, now held by Citigroup.</p> <p> Soon, Webster-Henestrosa&rsquo;s policy education was put to work when he was named the Deputy Secretary of Culture of the State of Oaxaca, which then led to his promotion to Secretary of Culture of the State in 2007.</p> <p> Now as Cultural Attach&eacute;, Andres has the opportunity to work directly with the over three million members of the Mexican-American community in Los Angeles as part of his day-to-day responsibilities.</p> <p> Los Angeles has the highest concentration of Mexicans in the US, and after Mexico City is the largest concentration of Mexicans in the world. &nbsp;Webster-Henestrosa&rsquo;s job is to help facilitate relationships between them and their culture of origin.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s fortunate because this generation is interested in understanding their origins and culture,&rdquo; said Henestrosa.&nbsp; &ldquo;We need to help provide them with more opportunities, particularly in the field of education.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="andres_henestrosa_1" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6651&amp;width=350&amp;height=233" style="width: 350px; height: 233px;" />Education is one of the big staples of Andres&acute; work in Los Angeles.&nbsp; One of the most important programs he is working on is the Forum of Higher Education, Innovation, and Research.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s basically an agreement between the US and Mexico where we can create more opportunities for Mexicans to take part in some form of higher education in the United States,&rdquo; added Webster-Henestrosa.</p> <p> &ldquo;The strong relationship Mexico and the United States have in the economic level is not reflected in terms of the educational level. If we have a partnership, if we share a market and want to build a knowledge region and economy, then we need to understand more each other, ant that is just possible fostering the academic and educational exchange between both countries. So we have to build more opportunities for Mexicans to study here&rdquo;.</p> <p> The native arts of Mexican culture also play a big role in the policy work of Andres. From promoting activities similar to ones still taking place in Mexico to encouraging more arts education, Andres sees the effectiveness that the arts can have in sustaining a community.</p> <p> &quot;Culture is the expression of what it is to be human,&rdquo; said Henestrosa.&nbsp; &ldquo;The challenge is how to take advantage of arts and culture &nbsp;and make them function for the well being of society.</p> <p> &ldquo;My experience as Secretary of Culture of the state in Oaxaca helped me to understand that developing appropriate policies to arts and culture is very helpful for the community,&rdquo; continued Webster-Henestrosa. &ldquo;On the one hand they can increase the economy and favor the labor market, but on the other hand they foster a better understanding among people, becoming a better society.</p> <p> &ldquo;So those policies have to be developed in a rational manner, with methodologies and skills, like the ones I received in the MAM program.&rdquo;</p> <p> Andres credits the time he spent in Heinz College as one of the biggest factors for preparing him for where he is today.</p> <p> &ldquo;Those three happy years are unforgettable to me,&rdquo; said Andres.&nbsp; &ldquo;I encountered many excellent friends, mentors and professors and I still use the analytical, computational, and language skills I learned there every single day. I think Heinz has a clear, defined program for managers and, in my case policy makers, to have a very structured methodologies based in quantitative tools and deep analyses.</p> <p> &ldquo;Heinz is a very challenging school and what I learned and experienced there have helped definitely in my career.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=188" target="">More info on the Masters of Arts Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1765Mon, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6716photo

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MEIM Students Hit the Sundance Film Festivalhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1764]]><p> For the past 30 years, the Sundance Film Festival, in Park City, UT, has brought storytellers and Hollywood players together with its annual program of dramatic and documentary films, shorts, installations, performances, panel discussions, and dynamic music events. Hundreds of films launched at the Festival have gone on to gain critical recognition, receive commercial distribution, and went on to reach worldwide audiences.</p> <p> Festivals like Sundance are big business and students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College&rsquo;s Master of Entertainment Industry Management Program were on hand to see how it all comes together.</p> <p> Students attend the Sundance Film Festival as part of their second year in the MEIM program each January. Students attend special seminars and panels both sponsored by Sundance and produced by MEIM leadership.</p> <p> &ldquo;Students attend the festival to learn more about film acquisitions and distribution.,&rdquo; said MEIM Program Director Dan Green. &ldquo;They go to see exactly how the films bought and sold, who the players are and why festivals like Sundance, Toronto, Tribeca matter so much in the entertainment industry.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;As part of their attendance at the festival, students attend workshops and meet major players in the film industry,&rdquo; continued Green. &ldquo;We typically have execs in marketing, film acquisitions, distribution, finance, as well as some producer/directors meeting our students in special intimate workshops. &ldquo;&nbsp;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="sundance_2015_1" class="left" height="169" src="image.aspx?id=6613&amp;width=1024&amp;height=576" width="301" />On the first day of seminars, students got to meet with David Dinerstein, the president of D Squared Films, a theatrical marketing and distribution company which has worked with A-list directors such as Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderberg, and Baz Luhrman,. Dinerstein&rsquo;s films have garnered over 90 Academy Award Nominations and 15 Academy Awards. The students also met with Ruth Vitalie, the President of Creative Future who is the past Founder and Co-President of Paramount Classics.</p> <p> The second day of seminars included Miguel Mier, the COO of Cin&eacute;polis, the fourth largest exhibition company in the world.&nbsp; Miguel is also a Heinz alumnus, graduating with a degree (MSIT, 2011).&nbsp; Students also heard from Scott Shooman, EVP of Acquisitions, CBS Films; and Matt Brodlie, EVP, Acquisitions of Relativity Media.&nbsp;</p> <p> The MEIM program and its alumni have always had a growing presence at Sundance and on the festival circuit, whether as content producers or presenters. &nbsp;&nbsp;It is not unusual for current students to sit in on a panel at a festival that is being led by an alumnus of the MEIM program. This year students heard from Lakshmi Iyengar<strong>, </strong>(MEIM 2009), Manager, Worldwide Acquisitions, Universal Pictures and Samantha Fabin (MEIM 2013), Manager, Acquisitions, Alchemy Entertainment.</p> <p> &ldquo;I gained a new found respect for the art of acquisitions, because it&rsquo;s a grind - while I was at Sundance, I was watching films for leisure, listening to panels and going to functions, however, these acquisitions executives and representatives only eat sleep and watch films, sometimes eight films each day,&rdquo; said Damian Bosiacki (MEIM &rsquo;15), after returning from the festival.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="sundance_2015_2" class="right" src="image.aspx?id=6614&amp;width=300&amp;height=169" style="width: 300px; height: 169px;" />&ldquo;Something that surprised me was that, acquisitions, traditionally has been a &lsquo;gut&rsquo; game,&rdquo; said Lisa Le (MEIM &rsquo;15) when asked about acquisitions and how it may change in the future..&nbsp; &ldquo;That is, acquisition folks at the studios generally buy films they feel confident will do well both commercially and critically. But seeing as how Netflix and Amazon have traditionally relied on big data to curate their content library, it&rsquo;ll be interesting to see how they choose to buy and how much they will rely on instinct vs. numbers.&rdquo;</p> <p> Aurelia Henderson (MEIM &rsquo;15) couldn&rsquo;t help but compare her Sundance experience to the experience she had at the South by Southwest Film (SXSW) Festival in the first year of the program.</p> <p> &ldquo;Sundance was a fascinating and informative experience, much different than the culture and atmosphere we experienced at SXSW,&rdquo; said Henderson. &ldquo;With a greater focus on the industry and emphasis on film acquisition as opposed to fan engagement, Sundance feels much more Hollywood; an event for the industry, about the industry.</p> <p> &ldquo;As someone whose passion and experience is more television oriented, I found myself much more intrigued by the world of independent filmmaking,&rdquo; continued Henderson. &ldquo;The time, dedication, and vast network of professionals in the area gave a buzz and excitement that I do not typically experience around film.</p> <p> &ldquo;Overall, I enjoyed the atmosphere and felt that the event really fostered a sense of intimacy between creators, executives, and up-and-comers.&ldquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I got a chance to listen to Harvey Weinstein speak with Indiewire,&rdquo; added Bosiacki. &ldquo;He had a great piece of advice for when someone asked what is the most important quality to have to make it in the industry, and he said, &lsquo;Understand that tenacity has to rule the day. You have to hang in that ring. You&rsquo;ll get beat up a lot, but you gotta fight.&rsquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;As a graduate student at Heinz College balancing school, work, and personal projects in the entertainment industry I completely agree that tenacity is essential if you want to make a living in this business.&nbsp;&ldquo;</p> <p> The MEIM program has afforded me with experiences and truly life-changing opportunities,&rdquo; said Le on the topic of Heinz College and the MEIM program. &ldquo;Both the curriculum and internships have really given me critical insights and crafted a more comprehensive understanding of the entertainment industry.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s equipped me with the necessary skills that I think will really help me succeed.&ldquo;</p> <p> Bosiacki agreed with the life changes the MEIM program has provided for him. &ldquo;I am still grateful to have received an opportunity to be a part of this program. If I had not joined it, I wouldn&rsquo;t have befriended the brilliant people that I am so lucky to know inside and outside of this program, created so many unforgettable memories, or garnered internships at Comedy Central, Principato-Young Entertainment, and Carousel Television.</p> <p> &ldquo;Also, the MEIM program has really forced me to grow up, but encourages me to stay young and creative at heart, which I really value and appreciate.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;The MEIM program is a hands-on, integrated, intensive with a focus on screen-based media which provides students with the knowledge and skill set to navigate the inner workings of the entertainment business,&rdquo; added Henderson. &ldquo;The program has given me the confidence and business sense to back up my taste and instinct in a way that makes my voice valuable in a room.</p> <p> &ldquo;That is a skill that is invaluable in an industry where your opinion is really the only leg you have to stand on.&rdquo;</p> <p> MEIM students have the opportunity to not only attend Sundance, but also the SXSW and Cannes Film Festivals as part of their education in the program.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=214" target="">More information on the Master of Entertainment Industry Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1764Mon, 24 Feb 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6612photo

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General David Fridovich Shares Thoughts on Leadership with Heinz Students and Veteranshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1763]]><p> <em>&ldquo;</em><em>No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.&rdquo;</em></p> <p> <em>- Andrew Carnegie</em></p> <p> Becoming an effective leader is one of the primary goals for anyone looking to create lasting change in their lives both personally and professionally. In order to provide insight on leadership, Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College invited retired Lieutenant General and Green Beret David P. Fridovich to speak with students as part of Heinz College&rsquo;s ongoing Leadership Lecture Series.</p> <p> His talk focused on his path to becoming a 3-star General as well as how to build trust, loyalty, and confidence while staying true to oneself as a leader. Fridovich was the senior Green Beret as well as Deputy Commander of the U.S. Military&#39;s Special Operations Command when he retired on November 14, 2011 after more than 37 years of service in the U.S. Army.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="firdovich1" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6601&amp;width=300&amp;height=200" />&ldquo;If you&rsquo;ve got a sense of values that you deeply believe in, you have to act on them,&rdquo; said Fridovich to a packed auditorium.&nbsp; &ldquo;This is the time as a graduate or undergraduate to get into what is important to you because that is going to be tested as you go out there.</p> <p> &ldquo;The set of core values that you bring are the ones that are going to guide you.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fridovich elaborated where his leadership principles come from through professional and personal anecdotes and took the time to answer questions from Heinz students.&nbsp; With a focus on integrity, Fridovich emphasized that a leader needs to stay true to their principles; because once your integrity has been damaged &ldquo;you can never go back.&rdquo;</p> <p> He also added that he was excited to be talking to a room full of future policy leaders, since gaps in education are, according to Fridovich, one of the biggest problems facing America today.</p> <p> Ashwin Rajaram, a Master of Science in Information Security Policy Management (MSISPM &rsquo;15) student and a current member of the US Navy since 2010 was the driving force behind getting General Fridovich, who is also his mentor, to come speak at Heinz.</p> <p> &ldquo;Lieutenant General Fridovich epitomizes the leader who sets the tone of integrity at the top,&rdquo; said Rajaram about his mentor. &ldquo;His actions and words permeate throughout an organization and make all personnel feel proud to be part of that team.<img align="" alt="fridovich2" class="right" src="image.aspx?id=6602&amp;width=300&amp;height=299" /></p> <p> &ldquo;The greatest gift you can give someone is your time, and he has been more than generous with his,&rdquo; continued Rajaram.&nbsp; &ldquo;I am very grateful for his time and hope I am able to be a fraction as effective a leader as he is.&rdquo;</p> <p> Rajaram is also a member of the Veterans Association at Heinz College.&nbsp; The Veterans Association, which is proud to have a member of every branch of the military currently enrolled at Heinz College, is a non-partisan student-led veterans group that exists to support military veterans and to help our student veterans smoothly make the transition from military to civilian life while ensuring academic success.</p> <p> &ldquo;Working with students across various cultures is an important skill for today&rsquo;s leaders and Heinz is a great place to learn these skills,&rdquo; said Rajaram. &ldquo;The student veterans group is a great organization with students who are leaders who carry themselves with the highest levels of integrity and standard.</p> <p> &ldquo;We are fortunate to have a great group who perform exceptionally well in the classroom and work to give back to the local community.&rdquo;</p> <p> Heinz College has been named a Military Friendly School for 4 years running.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3393" target="">Watch General David Fridovich&rsquo;s Talk at Heinz College &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=96" target="">More information on the MSISPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3229" target="">More information about the Heinz College Veteran&rsquo;s Association &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1763Mon, 16 Feb 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6600photo

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Jonathan Caulkins Elected To Prestigious National Academy of Engineeringhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1760]]><p> <strong><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/february/caulkins-nae.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></strong></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=19" target="_blank">Jonathan Caulkins</a>, the H. Guyford Stever Professor of Operations Research and Public Policy at the H. John Heinz III College, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest professional distinctions an engineer can receive.<br /> <br /> Caulkins has been cited &quot;for seminal contributions to the analysis, modeling and engineering of drug policy in the United States and abroad.&quot; With his election, CMU has been home to <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/about/rankings-awards/awards/national-academies.shtml" target="_blank">50 NAE members</a>.<br /> <br /> &quot;We are extremely proud of Jonathan Caulkins and his election to the National Academy of Engineering,&quot; said Heinz College Dean Ramayya Krishnan. &quot;Jon&#39;s work has been a shining example of the quality, in-depth research on societal problems we devote ourselves to here at Heinz College.&quot;<br /> <br /> Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to &quot;engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature,&quot; and to the &quot;pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.&quot;<br /> <br /> &quot;I am thrilled to have been selected,&quot; Caulkins said. &quot;I have had the great good fortune to work with an amazing set of co-authors, and much of the credit goes to them. Likewise, I look forward to meeting more people through membership in the Academy. It is an august group, and I am honored to be associated with them.&quot;<br /> <br /> Caulkins&#39; primary research interest is modeling the effectiveness of interventions related to drugs, crime, violence, delinquency and prevention. In addition to an extensive list of professional journal articles, Caulkins has co-authored 10 books, most recently &quot;Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know&quot; and &quot;Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know.&quot;<br /> <br /> A member of the Heinz College faculty since 1990, Caulkins previously served as director of the Masters of Science in Public Policy and Management program and as interim associate dean for faculty. From 2005 to 2011, he taught at CMU&#39;s Qatar campus.<br /> <br /> Also a leader at the RAND Corporation, Caulkins served as founding director of the organization&#39;s Pittsburgh office from 1999 to 2001. In addition, he served as co-director of the RAND&#39;s Drug Policy Research Center in Santa Monica, Calif., from 1994 to 1996. He has been an author or co-author on more than <a href="http://www.rand.org/pubs/authors/c/caulkins_jonathan_p.html" target="_blank">30 RAND publications</a>.<br /> <br /> For a full list of this year&#39;s 67 new NAE members, visit: <a href="http://www.nae.edu/Projects/MediaRoom/20095/130169/130172.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.nae.edu/Projects/MediaRoom/20095/130169/130172.aspx</a>.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1760Mon, 06 Feb 2015 23:45:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4231photo

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Individuals May Fail Tohttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1759]]><p> <span style="float:right"><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/january/privacy-tradeoffs.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></span> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> We leave a trail of data, both knowingly and unwittingly, with every swipe of a credit card, post on social media and query on a search engine.</p> <p> Carnegie Mellon University researchers detail the privacy hurdles people face while navigating in the information age, and what should be done about privacy at a policy level, in a review published in the Jan. 30 special issue of the journal <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6221/509">Science</a>.</p> <p> The review challenges a number of claims that have become common in the ongoing debate over privacy, including the claim that privacy may be an historical anomaly, or that people do not really care for data protection.</p> <p> &quot;Privacy is not a modern invention, but a historically universal need,&quot; said lead author Alessandro Acquisti, professor of information technology and public policy at CMU&#39;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx">H. John Heinz III College</a>. &quot;In certain situations, individuals will care for privacy quite a lot and act to protect it, but advances in technology and the acceleration of data collection challenge our ability to make self-interested decisions in the face of increasingly complex tradeoffs.&quot;</p> <p> Acquisti, along with CMU&#39;s Laura Brandimarte and George Loewenstein, identify three themes prevalent in empirical research on privacy decisions and behavior:</p> <ul> <li> People are often uncertain about the consequences of privacy-related behaviors and their own preferences over these consequences;</li> <li> People&#39;s concern, or lack thereof, about privacy is context dependent; and</li> <li> Privacy concerns are malleable, particularly by commercial and government influences.&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;</li> </ul> <p> People rarely know what information other individuals, organizations and governments have about them and how that information is used. Individuals may be aware of some of the consequences of privacy breaches, such as the costs of identity theft, but in other situations, such as sharing a family milestone online, the costs may be intangible. They also are likely to be uncertain about their own privacy preferences.</p> <p> The researchers note that context dependence plays a major role in privacy decision-making, but that many of the cues that determine people&#39;s behavior provide a crude or even misleading guide to the costs and benefits of revelation or concealment. For example, email feels more anonymous than talking face-to-face, even though email leaves an indelible record of the conversation.</p> <p> Privacy concerns are also malleable. People are easily influenced by outside forces, such as commercial or government interests, in what and how much they disclose. For example, default privacy options on websites are often accepted by users only because they seem more convenient or are perceived as implicitly recommended. Studies covered in the review also found that websites can employ so-called &quot;malicious design&quot; features that confuse users into disclosing personal information. Another study covered in the review found that individuals who were given more granular control over sharing options on a social network site ended up sharing more publicly than those not given such control &mdash; exactly the opposite of the pattern that control is intended to produce.</p> <p> &quot;Although control is the cornerstone of most policies designed to protect privacy, giving people more control increases trust and leads individuals to lower their guard and disclose more,&quot; said Brandimarte, a postdoctoral fellow at CMU&#39;s Heinz College.</p> <p> Insights the team gathered from social and behavior research suggest that policy approaches that rely solely on informing individuals of privacy risks posed by information technologies are inadequate. Rather, effective policies should rely on minimal requirement of informed or rational decision making. Most importantly, policies should focus on achieving a greater balance of power between individuals and data holders such as governments and corporations.</p> <p> &quot;People cannot always be counted upon to navigate the complex tradeoffs involving privacy in a self-interested fashion,&quot; said Loewenstein, the Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology at CMU&#39;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/">Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences</a>. &quot;They may need assistance, and even protection, to balance what is at present a very uneven playing field.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1759Mon, 30 Jan 2015 09:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6714photo

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Brian Kovak Wins the IZA Young Labor Economist Awardhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1758]]><p> Traditionally, international economists have thought about trade in terms of how it affects the labor market at the national level. A country changing its trade policy or experiencing increasing trade might face changes in employment levels or increasing or decreasing wages for different groups of workers.</p> <p> However, what hasn&#39;t received much attention is the notion that trade might have very different effects across local labor markets within a country.&nbsp; This local approach to a global concept is what earned Heinz College&rsquo;s Brian Kovak the IZA Young Labor Economist Award, which honors the best-published article in a peer-reviewed journal written by young scholars under 40.</p> <p> Kovak&rsquo;s paper, &ldquo;Regional Effects of Trade Reform: What is the Correct Measure of Liberalization?&rdquo; was published in the American Economic Review in 2013 and it focuses on the idea that the effects of a national trade policy could vary when analyzed at a subnational level.</p> <p> &ldquo;Economists tend to support international trade because the gains for the winners are larger than the losses for the losers, so we could in theory compensate people through various public policies so that everyone could win from trade liberalization,&rdquo; said Kovak who serves as an assistant professor of Economics and Public Policy at Heinz College. &ldquo;So, economists tend to support international trade because it creates economic efficiencies that can make everyone better off.&rdquo;</p> <p> According to Kovak, trade policy, which is made at the national level in the United States as well as many other countries, will have very different effects on different places. His theory captures the notion that if you&#39;re living in a city producing goods whose prices fall as a result of increased trade or trade liberalization, then conditions will deteriorate in that local labor market, as compared to other markets.</p> <p> &ldquo;So, if we&#39;re thinking about Pittsburgh in the 1960&#39;s or 70&#39;s, if the relative price of steel falls, compared to other goods, then that&#39;s going to be bad, not just for steel workers, but also for other workers in Pittsburgh.&nbsp; They will then have to compete with those former steel workers for remaining jobs in that local labor market,&rdquo; continued Kovak.&nbsp; &ldquo;A person in Pittsburgh doing mining might do badly if the steel industry collapses, not necessarily because they were selling their output to the steel industry, but because now there are many workers competing for jobs in the local labor market, driving down wages.</p> <p> &ldquo;So, there&#39;s been a sharper focus on the potential downsides of increased trade and trade liberalization in the last five to ten years.&nbsp; This local labor market approach is one way of thinking about how those costs and benefits might be distributed throughout the labor market.&rdquo;</p> <p> Kovak&rsquo;s work, which focused on trade liberalization in Brazil after 1990, continues across two additional papers, co-authored with Duke University&rsquo;s Raphael Dix-Carneiro.&nbsp; The first paper looks at the dynamics of the effects studied in Kovak&rsquo;s award-winning paper. It uses twenty-five years of &ldquo;matched employer-employee&rdquo; data, where one can observe detailed information about individual workers and employers, and can follow them over time.</p> <p> &ldquo;Not only does a particular city in Brazil have a very different outcome than another city in Brazil five years later.&nbsp; If you follow those cities for ten more years, until 2010, you find that their outcomes have diverged even further. Things are getting relatively worse in negatively affected places and relatively better in more positively affected places,&rdquo; added Kovak.</p> <p> The second paper generalizes Kovak&rsquo;s model to allow for two different kinds of laborers, highly educated and less educated workers, allowing the study of trade&rsquo;s effects on income inequality.</p> <p> &ldquo;Trade had a small, but non-trivial effect on declining wage gaps between highly skilled and less skilled workers in Brazil,&rdquo; continued Kovak.&nbsp; &ldquo;Although there may be other mechanisms through which trade can affect inequality and many other phenomena that also affect inequality, we find that these local liberalization effects drove a portion of the decline in Brazilian inequality in recent years.&rdquo;</p> <p> Kovak credits the &ldquo;vibrant academic environment&rdquo; of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Heinz College for fostering this kind of applied microeconomic research.</p> <p> &ldquo;This research focuses on the effects of changes in trade policy, rather than the effects of events that are harder to control or anticipate, such as technological innovation or economic development in trading partners,&rdquo; said Kovak. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s important for policy makers to understand the effects of policies that we can control.&rdquo;</p> <p> Kovak received the IZA Young Labor Economist Award this past January 6<sup>th</sup> in Boston, MA.&nbsp; The IZA is a private, independent research institute, which conducts nationally and internationally oriented labor market research and sees itself as an international research institute and a place for communication between academic science, politics, and economic practice.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/bkovak/kovak_brazil.pdf" target="_blank">Read Regional Effects of Trade Reform: What is the Correct Measure of Liberalization? &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=134" target="">More information on the MSPPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1758Mon, 21 Jan 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6717photo

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