Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College MEIM Students Hit the Sundance Film Festivalhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1764]]><p> For the past 30 years, the Sundance Film Festival, in Park City, UT, has brought storytellers and Hollywood players together with its annual program of dramatic and documentary films, shorts, installations, performances, panel discussions, and dynamic music events. Hundreds of films launched at the Festival have gone on to gain critical recognition, receive commercial distribution, and went on to reach worldwide audiences.</p> <p> Festivals like Sundance are big business and students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College&rsquo;s Master of Entertainment Industry Management Program were on hand to see how it all comes together.</p> <p> Students attend the Sundance Film Festival as part of their second year in the MEIM program each January. Students attend special seminars and panels both sponsored by Sundance and produced by MEIM leadership.</p> <p> &ldquo;Students attend the festival to learn more about film acquisitions and distribution.,&rdquo; said MEIM Program Director Dan Green. &ldquo;They go to see exactly how the films bought and sold, who the players are and why festivals like Sundance, Toronto, Tribeca matter so much in the entertainment industry.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;As part of their attendance at the festival, students attend workshops and meet major players in the film industry,&rdquo; continued Green. &ldquo;We typically have execs in marketing, film acquisitions, distribution, finance, as well as some producer/directors meeting our students in special intimate workshops. &ldquo;&nbsp;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="sundance_2015_1" class="left" height="169" src="image.aspx?id=6613&amp;width=1024&amp;height=576" width="301" />On the first day of seminars, students got to meet with David Dinerstein, the president of D Squared Films, a theatrical marketing and distribution company which has worked with A-list directors such as Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderberg, and Baz Luhrman,. Dinerstein&rsquo;s films have garnered over 90 Academy Award Nominations and 15 Academy Awards. The students also met with Ruth Vitalie, the President of Creative Future who is the past Founder and Co-President of Paramount Classics.</p> <p> The second day of seminars included Miguel Mier, the COO of Cin&eacute;polis, the fourth largest exhibition company in the world.&nbsp; Miguel is also a Heinz alumnus, graduating with a degree (MSIT, 2011).&nbsp; Students also heard from Scott Shooman, EVP of Acquisitions, CBS Films; and Matt Brodlie, EVP, Acquisitions of Relativity Media.&nbsp;</p> <p> The MEIM program and its alumni have always had a growing presence at Sundance and on the festival circuit, whether as content producers or presenters. &nbsp;&nbsp;It is not unusual for current students to sit in on a panel at a festival that is being led by an alumnus of the MEIM program. This year students heard from Lakshmi Iyengar<strong>, </strong>(MEIM 2009), Manager, Worldwide Acquisitions, Universal Pictures and Samantha Fabin (MEIM 2013), Manager, Acquisitions, Alchemy Entertainment.</p> <p> &ldquo;I gained a new found respect for the art of acquisitions, because it&rsquo;s a grind - while I was at Sundance, I was watching films for leisure, listening to panels and going to functions, however, these acquisitions executives and representatives only eat sleep and watch films, sometimes eight films each day,&rdquo; said Damian Bosiacki (MEIM &rsquo;15), after returning from the festival.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="sundance_2015_2" class="right" src="image.aspx?id=6614&amp;width=300&amp;height=169" style="width: 300px; height: 169px;" />&ldquo;Something that surprised me was that, acquisitions, traditionally has been a &lsquo;gut&rsquo; game,&rdquo; said Lisa Le (MEIM &rsquo;15) when asked about acquisitions and how it may change in the future..&nbsp; &ldquo;That is, acquisition folks at the studios generally buy films they feel confident will do well both commercially and critically. But seeing as how Netflix and Amazon have traditionally relied on big data to curate their content library, it&rsquo;ll be interesting to see how they choose to buy and how much they will rely on instinct vs. numbers.&rdquo;</p> <p> Aurelia Henderson (MEIM &rsquo;15) couldn&rsquo;t help but compare her Sundance experience to the experience she had at the South by Southwest Film (SXSW) Festival in the first year of the program.</p> <p> &ldquo;Sundance was a fascinating and informative experience, much different than the culture and atmosphere we experienced at SXSW,&rdquo; said Henderson. &ldquo;With a greater focus on the industry and emphasis on film acquisition as opposed to fan engagement, Sundance feels much more Hollywood; an event for the industry, about the industry.</p> <p> &ldquo;As someone whose passion and experience is more television oriented, I found myself much more intrigued by the world of independent filmmaking,&rdquo; continued Henderson. &ldquo;The time, dedication, and vast network of professionals in the area gave a buzz and excitement that I do not typically experience around film.</p> <p> &ldquo;Overall, I enjoyed the atmosphere and felt that the event really fostered a sense of intimacy between creators, executives, and up-and-comers.&ldquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I got a chance to listen to Harvey Weinstein speak with Indiewire,&rdquo; added Bosiacki. &ldquo;He had a great piece of advice for when someone asked what is the most important quality to have to make it in the industry, and he said, &lsquo;Understand that tenacity has to rule the day. You have to hang in that ring. You&rsquo;ll get beat up a lot, but you gotta fight.&rsquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;As a graduate student at Heinz College balancing school, work, and personal projects in the entertainment industry I completely agree that tenacity is essential if you want to make a living in this business.&nbsp;&ldquo;</p> <p> The MEIM program has afforded me with experiences and truly life-changing opportunities,&rdquo; said Le on the topic of Heinz College and the MEIM program. &ldquo;Both the curriculum and internships have really given me critical insights and crafted a more comprehensive understanding of the entertainment industry.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s equipped me with the necessary skills that I think will really help me succeed.&ldquo;</p> <p> Bosiacki agreed with the life changes the MEIM program has provided for him. &ldquo;I am still grateful to have received an opportunity to be a part of this program. If I had not joined it, I wouldn&rsquo;t have befriended the brilliant people that I am so lucky to know inside and outside of this program, created so many unforgettable memories, or garnered internships at Comedy Central, Principato-Young Entertainment, and Carousel Television.</p> <p> &ldquo;Also, the MEIM program has really forced me to grow up, but encourages me to stay young and creative at heart, which I really value and appreciate.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;The MEIM program is a hands-on, integrated, intensive with a focus on screen-based media which provides students with the knowledge and skill set to navigate the inner workings of the entertainment business,&rdquo; added Henderson. &ldquo;The program has given me the confidence and business sense to back up my taste and instinct in a way that makes my voice valuable in a room.</p> <p> &ldquo;That is a skill that is invaluable in an industry where your opinion is really the only leg you have to stand on.&rdquo;</p> <p> MEIM students have the opportunity to not only attend Sundance, but also the SXSW and Cannes Film Festivals as part of their education in the program.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=214" target="">More information on the Master of Entertainment Industry Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1764Mon, 24 Feb 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6612photo

]]>
General David Fridovich Shares Thoughts on Leadership with Heinz Students and Veteranshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1763]]><p> <em>&ldquo;</em><em>No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.&rdquo;</em></p> <p> <em>- Andrew Carnegie</em></p> <p> Becoming an effective leader is one of the primary goals for anyone looking to create lasting change in their lives both personally and professionally. In order to provide insight on leadership, Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College invited retired Lieutenant General and Green Beret David P. Fridovich to speak with students as part of Heinz College&rsquo;s ongoing Leadership Lecture Series.</p> <p> His talk focused on his path to becoming a 3-star General as well as how to build trust, loyalty, and confidence while staying true to oneself as a leader. Fridovich was the senior Green Beret as well as Deputy Commander of the U.S. Military&#39;s Special Operations Command when he retired on November 14, 2011 after more than 37 years of service in the U.S. Army.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="firdovich1" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6601&amp;width=300&amp;height=200" />&ldquo;If you&rsquo;ve got a sense of values that you deeply believe in, you have to act on them,&rdquo; said Fridovich to a packed auditorium.&nbsp; &ldquo;This is the time as a graduate or undergraduate to get into what is important to you because that is going to be tested as you go out there.</p> <p> &ldquo;The set of core values that you bring are the ones that are going to guide you.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fridovich elaborated where his leadership principles come from through professional and personal anecdotes and took the time to answer questions from Heinz students.&nbsp; With a focus on integrity, Fridovich emphasized that a leader needs to stay true to their principles; because once your integrity has been damaged &ldquo;you can never go back.&rdquo;</p> <p> He also added that he was excited to be talking to a room full of future policy leaders, since gaps in education are, according to Fridovich, one of the biggest problems facing America today.</p> <p> Ashwin Rajaram, a Master of Science in Information Security Policy Management (MSISPM &rsquo;15) student and a current member of the US Navy since 2010 was the driving force behind getting General Fridovich, who is also his mentor, to come speak at Heinz.</p> <p> &ldquo;Lieutenant General Fridovich epitomizes the leader who sets the tone of integrity at the top,&rdquo; said Rajaram about his mentor. &ldquo;His actions and words permeate throughout an organization and make all personnel feel proud to be part of that team.<img align="" alt="fridovich2" class="right" src="image.aspx?id=6602&amp;width=300&amp;height=299" /></p> <p> &ldquo;The greatest gift you can give someone is your time, and he has been more than generous with his,&rdquo; continued Rajaram.&nbsp; &ldquo;I am very grateful for his time and hope I am able to be a fraction as effective a leader as he is.&rdquo;</p> <p> Rajaram is also a member of the Veterans Association at Heinz College.&nbsp; The Veterans Association, which is proud to have a member of every branch of the military currently enrolled at Heinz College, is a non-partisan student-led veterans group that exists to support military veterans and to help our student veterans smoothly make the transition from military to civilian life while ensuring academic success.</p> <p> &ldquo;Working with students across various cultures is an important skill for today&rsquo;s leaders and Heinz is a great place to learn these skills,&rdquo; said Rajaram. &ldquo;The student veterans group is a great organization with students who are leaders who carry themselves with the highest levels of integrity and standard.</p> <p> &ldquo;We are fortunate to have a great group who perform exceptionally well in the classroom and work to give back to the local community.&rdquo;</p> <p> Heinz College has been named a Military Friendly School for 4 years running.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3393" target="">Watch General David Fridovich&rsquo;s Talk at Heinz College &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=96" target="">More information on the MSISPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3229" target="">More information about the Heinz College Veteran&rsquo;s Association &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1763Mon, 16 Feb 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6600photo

]]>
MAM Alumnus Turns Pittsburgh’s Gulf Tower Into a Giant Mood Ringhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1761]]><p> Remember mood rings?&nbsp; The wearable fad from the 70&rsquo;s that would allegedly change color based on your mood.&nbsp; Granted, the changing color of a mood ring had nothing to do with your emotional state and everything to do with your body temperature, but what if you could wear one that actually worked? And what if you could see one that gauged the mood of an entire city?</p> <p> One Heinz College Alumnus set out to do just that and turned Pittsburgh&rsquo;s Gulf Tower beacon into a massive, citywide mood ring.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="brad_stephenson_thumb" class="left" height="168" src="image.aspx?id=6588&amp;width=200&amp;height=200" width="168" />Brad Stephenson, a Master of Arts Management alumnus from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College (MAM &rsquo;05), currently serves as the Marketing Director at the Carnegie Museum of Art and is the driving force behind the project.&nbsp; The inspiration for the Gulf Tower Project came when the museum was preparing for an upcoming exhibit featuring the first solo exhibition of New York-based French artist, Antoine Catala.</p> <p> Catala&rsquo;s exhibit, <em>Distant Feel</em>, which opens this February 14<sup>th</sup>, presents a new body of work in sculpture, photography, and video that addresses the way that images provoke emotion, especially as they travel virtual and physical distances via the internet. Catala&rsquo;s work explores the many ways we express feelings, particularly in terms of empathy.</p> <p> &ldquo;When we were exploring marketing activities for <em>Distant Feel</em>, the curator mentioned there would be an aquarium with live coral involved,&rdquo; said Stephenson. &ldquo;I thought about the idea of sharing emotion through technology and wondered if we could change the color of the aquarium lighting using social media in some way. Then I thought, what if we could change the color of the fountain in front of the museum.</p> <p> &ldquo;Then I thought, why not just change the color of a building.&rdquo;</p> <p> The six-story-tall Gulf Tower beacon first opened in 1932 and has taken full advantage of its new LED lighting system that was installed in 2012 by displaying weather information and allowing both the Pittsburgh Pirates and Penguins alter the lighting on the tower on game days.&nbsp; The Carnegie Museum of Art is now only the third organization that will have access to the beacon.</p> <p> But how will the museum use it to display the mood of Pittsburgh?</p> <p> &ldquo;The biggest challenge was really understanding how we wanted this to work,&rdquo; continued Stephenson. &ldquo;Do we use a hashtag? An online poll? Through discussions with developer David Newbury, who works on other projects with CMOA, we determined the best thing to do would be to tap into things that are being shared organically in Pittsburgh via Instagram, rather than creating our own process. By using publicly available social media activity, we don&rsquo;t have to rely on people participating in a newly created process.&ldquo;<img align="" alt="tower_status" class="right" src="image.aspx?id=6589&amp;width=987&amp;height=843" style="width: 300px; height: 255px;" /></p> <p> Newbury added that he took the project because he enjoys &ldquo;technology that uses the web, but also brings it into the real world&mdash;technology that feels magical.&rdquo;</p> <p> The Gulf Tower Project will run from February 11<sup>th</sup> through the 13<sup>th</sup> and will change from green (for positive) to red (for negative) based on the prevailing mood of people in Pittsburgh as determined by the &ldquo;sentiment analysis&rdquo; from Instagram posts and comments.</p> <p> Stephenson credits his time at Heinz College with preparing him for the Gulf Tower project and for his current position as Marketing Director for the Carnegie Museum of Art.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s important to have an understanding of what&rsquo;s feasible from a creative, technical, and storytelling perspective so your initial brainstorming can be as limitless as possible,&rdquo; said Stephenson. &ldquo;Because Heinz College and Carnegie Mellon University programs are so interdisciplinary at their core, you get an education that prepares you to think about art, technology, business, storytelling, and engagement in very unique ways.</p> <p> &ldquo;Heinz College gives you the tools to dream big and the data-driven methods to measure results and invest wisely in future activities.&nbsp;</p> <p> And when the Gulf Tower Project wraps up on the 13<sup>th</sup>?</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re hoping we can dig into the data and find a compelling story,&rdquo; added Stephenson.</p> <p> &ldquo;If not, at least we hope to show a daily average count of shirtless selfies taken in Pittsburgh,&rdquo; he joked.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://tower.cmoa.org/" target="_blank">More information about the Gulf Tower Project &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=188" target="">More information on the Master of Arts Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1761Mon, 12 Feb 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6587photo

]]>
Jonathan Caulkins Elected To Prestigious National Academy of Engineeringhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1760]]><p> <strong><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/february/caulkins-nae.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></strong></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=19" target="_blank">Jonathan Caulkins</a>, the H. Guyford Stever Professor of Operations Research and Public Policy at the H. John Heinz III College, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest professional distinctions an engineer can receive.<br /> <br /> Caulkins has been cited &quot;for seminal contributions to the analysis, modeling and engineering of drug policy in the United States and abroad.&quot; With his election, CMU has been home to <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/about/rankings-awards/awards/national-academies.shtml" target="_blank">50 NAE members</a>.<br /> <br /> &quot;We are extremely proud of Jonathan Caulkins and his election to the National Academy of Engineering,&quot; said Heinz College Dean Ramayya Krishnan. &quot;Jon&#39;s work has been a shining example of the quality, in-depth research on societal problems we devote ourselves to here at Heinz College.&quot;<br /> <br /> Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to &quot;engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature,&quot; and to the &quot;pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.&quot;<br /> <br /> &quot;I am thrilled to have been selected,&quot; Caulkins said. &quot;I have had the great good fortune to work with an amazing set of co-authors, and much of the credit goes to them. Likewise, I look forward to meeting more people through membership in the Academy. It is an august group, and I am honored to be associated with them.&quot;<br /> <br /> Caulkins&#39; primary research interest is modeling the effectiveness of interventions related to drugs, crime, violence, delinquency and prevention. In addition to an extensive list of professional journal articles, Caulkins has co-authored 10 books, most recently &quot;Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know&quot; and &quot;Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know.&quot;<br /> <br /> A member of the Heinz College faculty since 1990, Caulkins previously served as director of the Masters of Science in Public Policy and Management program and as interim associate dean for faculty. From 2005 to 2011, he taught at CMU&#39;s Qatar campus.<br /> <br /> Also a leader at the RAND Corporation, Caulkins served as founding director of the organization&#39;s Pittsburgh office from 1999 to 2001. In addition, he served as co-director of the RAND&#39;s Drug Policy Research Center in Santa Monica, Calif., from 1994 to 1996. He has been an author or co-author on more than <a href="http://www.rand.org/pubs/authors/c/caulkins_jonathan_p.html" target="_blank">30 RAND publications</a>.<br /> <br /> For a full list of this year&#39;s 67 new NAE members, visit: <a href="http://www.nae.edu/Projects/MediaRoom/20095/130169/130172.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.nae.edu/Projects/MediaRoom/20095/130169/130172.aspx</a>.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1760Mon, 06 Feb 2015 23:45:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4231photo

]]>
Carnegie Mellon Team Finds Individuals May Fail To Navigate Complex Tradeoffs in Privacy Decision-Makinghttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1759]]><p> <em><strong>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/january/privacy-tradeoffs.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</strong></em></p> <p> We leave a trail of data, both knowingly and unwittingly, with every swipe of a credit card, post on social media and query on a search engine.</p> <p> Carnegie Mellon University researchers detail the privacy hurdles people face while navigating in the information age, and what should be done about privacy at a policy level, in a review published in the Jan. 30 special issue of the journal <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6221/509">Science</a>.</p> <p> The review challenges a number of claims that have become common in the ongoing debate over privacy, including the claim that privacy may be an historical anomaly, or that people do not really care for data protection.</p> <p> &quot;Privacy is not a modern invention, but a historically universal need,&quot; said lead author Alessandro Acquisti, professor of information technology and public policy at CMU&#39;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx">H. John Heinz III College</a>. &quot;In certain situations, individuals will care for privacy quite a lot and act to protect it, but advances in technology and the acceleration of data collection challenge our ability to make self-interested decisions in the face of increasingly complex tradeoffs.&quot;</p> <p> Acquisti, along with CMU&#39;s Laura Brandimarte and George Loewenstein, identify three themes prevalent in empirical research on privacy decisions and behavior:</p> <ul> <li> People are often uncertain about the consequences of privacy-related behaviors and their own preferences over these consequences;</li> <li> People&#39;s concern, or lack thereof, about privacy is context dependent; and</li> <li> Privacy concerns are malleable, particularly by commercial and government influences.&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;</li> </ul> <p> People rarely know what information other individuals, organizations and governments have about them and how that information is used. Individuals may be aware of some of the consequences of privacy breaches, such as the costs of identity theft, but in other situations, such as sharing a family milestone online, the costs may be intangible. They also are likely to be uncertain about their own privacy preferences.</p> <p> The researchers note that context dependence plays a major role in privacy decision-making, but that many of the cues that determine people&#39;s behavior provide a crude or even misleading guide to the costs and benefits of revelation or concealment. For example, email feels more anonymous than talking face-to-face, even though email leaves an indelible record of the conversation.</p> <p> Privacy concerns are also malleable. People are easily influenced by outside forces, such as commercial or government interests, in what and how much they disclose. For example, default privacy options on websites are often accepted by users only because they seem more convenient or are perceived as implicitly recommended. Studies covered in the review also found that websites can employ so-called &quot;malicious design&quot; features that confuse users into disclosing personal information. Another study covered in the review found that individuals who were given more granular control over sharing options on a social network site ended up sharing more publicly than those not given such control &mdash; exactly the opposite of the pattern that control is intended to produce.</p> <p> &quot;Although control is the cornerstone of most policies designed to protect privacy, giving people more control increases trust and leads individuals to lower their guard and disclose more,&quot; said Brandimarte, a postdoctoral fellow at CMU&#39;s Heinz College.</p> <p> Insights the team gathered from social and behavior research suggest that policy approaches that rely solely on informing individuals of privacy risks posed by information technologies are inadequate. Rather, effective policies should rely on minimal requirement of informed or rational decision making. Most importantly, policies should focus on achieving a greater balance of power between individuals and data holders such as governments and corporations.</p> <p> &quot;People cannot always be counted upon to navigate the complex tradeoffs involving privacy in a self-interested fashion,&quot; said Loewenstein, the Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Economics and Psychology at CMU&#39;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/">Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences</a>. &quot;They may need assistance, and even protection, to balance what is at present a very uneven playing field.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1759Mon, 30 Jan 2015 09:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6574photo

]]>
Brian Kovak Wins the IZA Young Labor Economist Awardhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1758]]><p> Traditionally, international economists have thought about trade in terms of how it affects the labor market at the national level. A country changing its trade policy or experiencing increasing trade might face changes in employment levels or increasing or decreasing wages for different groups of workers.</p> <p> However, what hasn&#39;t received much attention is the notion that trade might have very different effects across local labor markets within a country.&nbsp; This local approach to a global concept is what earned Heinz College&rsquo;s Brian Kovak the IZA Young Labor Economist Award, which honors the best-published article in a peer-reviewed journal written by young scholars under 40.</p> <p> Kovak&rsquo;s paper, &ldquo;Regional Effects of Trade Reform: What is the Correct Measure of Liberalization?&rdquo; was published in the American Economic Review in 2013 and it focuses on the idea that the effects of a national trade policy could vary when analyzed at a subnational level.</p> <p> &ldquo;Economists tend to support international trade because the gains for the winners are larger than the losses for the losers, so we could in theory compensate people through various public policies so that everyone could win from trade liberalization,&rdquo; said Kovak who serves as an assistant professor of Economics and Public Policy at Heinz College. &ldquo;So, economists tend to support international trade because it creates economic efficiencies that can make everyone better off.&rdquo;</p> <p> According to Kovak, trade policy, which is made at the national level in the United States as well as many other countries, will have very different effects on different places. His theory captures the notion that if you&#39;re living in a city producing goods whose prices fall as a result of increased trade or trade liberalization, then conditions will deteriorate in that local labor market, as compared to other markets.</p> <p> &ldquo;So, if we&#39;re thinking about Pittsburgh in the 1960&#39;s or 70&#39;s, if the relative price of steel falls, compared to other goods, then that&#39;s going to be bad, not just for steel workers, but also for other workers in Pittsburgh.&nbsp; They will then have to compete with those former steel workers for remaining jobs in that local labor market,&rdquo; continued Kovak.&nbsp; &ldquo;A person in Pittsburgh doing mining might do badly if the steel industry collapses, not necessarily because they were selling their output to the steel industry, but because now there are many workers competing for jobs in the local labor market, driving down wages.</p> <p> &ldquo;So, there&#39;s been a sharper focus on the potential downsides of increased trade and trade liberalization in the last five to ten years.&nbsp; This local labor market approach is one way of thinking about how those costs and benefits might be distributed throughout the labor market.&rdquo;</p> <p> Kovak&rsquo;s work, which focused on trade liberalization in Brazil after 1990, continues across two additional papers, co-authored with Duke University&rsquo;s Raphael Dix-Carneiro.&nbsp; The first paper looks at the dynamics of the effects studied in Kovak&rsquo;s award-winning paper. It uses twenty-five years of &ldquo;matched employer-employee&rdquo; data, where one can observe detailed information about individual workers and employers, and can follow them over time.</p> <p> &ldquo;Not only does a particular city in Brazil have a very different outcome than another city in Brazil five years later.&nbsp; If you follow those cities for ten more years, until 2010, you find that their outcomes have diverged even further. Things are getting relatively worse in negatively affected places and relatively better in more positively affected places,&rdquo; added Kovak.</p> <p> The second paper generalizes Kovak&rsquo;s model to allow for two different kinds of laborers, highly educated and less educated workers, allowing the study of trade&rsquo;s effects on income inequality.</p> <p> &ldquo;Trade had a small, but non-trivial effect on declining wage gaps between highly skilled and less skilled workers in Brazil,&rdquo; continued Kovak.&nbsp; &ldquo;Although there may be other mechanisms through which trade can affect inequality and many other phenomena that also affect inequality, we find that these local liberalization effects drove a portion of the decline in Brazilian inequality in recent years.&rdquo;</p> <p> Kovak credits the &ldquo;vibrant academic environment&rdquo; of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Heinz College for fostering this kind of applied microeconomic research.</p> <p> &ldquo;This research focuses on the effects of changes in trade policy, rather than the effects of events that are harder to control or anticipate, such as technological innovation or economic development in trading partners,&rdquo; said Kovak. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s important for policy makers to understand the effects of policies that we can control.&rdquo;</p> <p> Kovak received the IZA Young Labor Economist Award this past January 6<sup>th</sup> in Boston, MA.&nbsp; The IZA is a private, independent research institute, which conducts nationally and internationally oriented labor market research and sees itself as an international research institute and a place for communication between academic science, politics, and economic practice.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/bkovak/kovak_brazil.pdf" target="_blank">Read Regional Effects of Trade Reform: What is the Correct Measure of Liberalization? &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=134" target="">More information on the MSPPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1758Mon, 21 Jan 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6565photo

]]>
Heinz DC Alumni Publish Book on Olympic Bid Processhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1757]]><p> A group of four alumni from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College are authors of a book on the Olympic Games bid process, entitled &ldquo;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Bidding-Development-Accelerate-Transportation-Management/dp/1461489113">Bidding for Development: How the Olympic Bid Process Can Accelerate Transportation Development</a>.&rdquo;</p> <p> The authors &mdash; Mary Trina Bolton, Ngiste R. Abebe, Maggie M. Pavelka, and Morgan L. Pierstorff (pictured from left to right starting with Heinz faculty advisor, Andy Richman) &mdash; are 2012 graduates of the Heinz College&rsquo;s Master of Science, Public Policy and Management&rsquo;s (MSPPM-DC) Washington D.C. track.</p> <p> The book began as a master&rsquo;s level capstone project in 2011, during which time the authors were second-year students of the Heinz College&rsquo;s MSPPM-DC program. As a graduation requirement, MSPPM-DC students are tasked with researching and proposing solutions to real-life public policy issues. Following their graduation in May 2012, the quartet was invited to the U.K. to present their findings at a conference hosted by the Royal Holloway University of London&rsquo;s (RHUL) &ldquo;Olympics and the &lsquo;isms&rsquo; Conference,&rdquo; in advance of the London 2012 Olympic Games.</p> <p> Published by Springer in November 2013, the book is part of the &ldquo;Sports Economics, Management and Policy&rdquo; series, designed to provide academics, students, sports business executives, and policymakers with information and analysis on the cutting edge of sports economics, sport management, and public policy on sporting issues. The series editor, Dr. Dennis Coates, a professor of economics at University of Maryland-Baltimore County who is widely regarded as a subject-matter expert, served as an advisor to the group&rsquo;s capstone project in 2012 and provided the foreword to the book.</p> <p> &ldquo;What excited me about the students&rsquo; work was that they came up with something new -- a framework where countries could develop bids based on its potential to help spur infrastructure development, something that most cities need help with,&rdquo; noted Dr. Coates. &ldquo;By focusing their efforts on the development of a sound infrastructure plan as part of the bid process, cities hosting mega-events could create a lasting legacy that goes beyond the hype and costly spending typically associated with these events.&rdquo;</p> <p> During a panel discussion hosted by the Heinz College in Washington, D.C. on November 13, Dr. Coates and the authors&mdash;joined by CMU alum Chris Watts&mdash;discussed the complex business of bidding for mega-events. The panelists weighed a city&rsquo;s potential for long-term strategic development against the extreme price tag of bidding to host. The dialogue focused on the largest global mega-event&mdash;the Olympic Games&mdash;and spanned dynamic policy areas from transportation and urban development to sports economics and diplomacy.</p> <p> &ldquo;These four Heinz DC students turned their graduate work into a timely and important contribution regarding urban planning and the Olympics,&quot; said John Flaherty, distinguished service professor at Heinz College Washington D.C. &quot;They have become subject matter experts on a critical subject for cities interested in hosting the Olympics and we are terrifically proud of them.&quot;</p> <p> To learn more about Bidding for Development, please go to:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://bringindevelopment.wordpress.com/">http://bringindevelopment.wordpress.com/</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Bidding-Development-Accelerate-Transportation-Management/dp/1461489113/ref=la_B00J72BV1E_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1416074253&amp;sr=1-1">http://www.amazon.com/Bidding-Development-Accelerate-Transportation-Management/dp/1461489113/ref=la_B00J72BV1E_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1416074253&amp;sr=1-1</a></li> </ul> <p> To learn more about Heinz DC go to:&nbsp; <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/dc">www.heinz.cmu.edu/dc</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1757Mon, 06 Jan 2015 11:29:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6554photo

]]>
Heinz Student Highlights the Future of Women in Transportationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1756]]><p> PITTSBURGH &ndash; Zoe Levenson (<a href="retCmsId=72" target="">Master of Information Systems and Management</a> &rsquo;15) has always been interested in urban planning and the world of transportation.&nbsp; With the ever-increasing infusion of technology and innovation, the transportation industry is undergoing a complete transformation. The issues that come with rapid transformation like this require future leaders with a vested interest in the technology and analytical skills needed to solve them.&nbsp;</p> <p> Levenson endeavors to be one of those future leaders, which is why she was selected to be this year&rsquo;s recipient of the Women in Transportation Fellowship.</p> <p> &ldquo;The Women in Transportation Fellowship is an opportunity for a student like Zoe to gain systemic exposure to the industry,&rdquo; said Traffic21 Program Director Courtney Ehrlichman. &nbsp;&ldquo;From research, funding, politics, she sees how Traffic21 partners with real world agencies and organizations to get the technology out of the university and onto our streets.&rdquo;</p> <p> Levenson has already taken great strides toward earning her WIT fellowship.&nbsp; She is building a database for T-Set, the National USDOT University Transportation Center for Safety, she is conducting research with Dr. Sean Qian and the T-SET UTC Mobility Analytics Center, and she is even forming a Transportation Club on campus with a group of other students.</p> <p> &ldquo;So far we have set a vision for the club, tried out a few event types, and are beginning to develop programming for the spring to bring awareness to the campus student body about the breadth and width of the transportation industry,&rdquo; added Levenson.</p> <p> Beyond her on campus activities, Levenson is also looking towards furthering transportation technology in the region.&nbsp; She recently joined the board of the Women Transportation Seminar <em>Pittsburgh Chapter, </em>which has been partly formed by Ehrlichman.</p> <p> &ldquo;I get to work with a group of women already working in the field to form a chapter of an international organization and learning how to incorporate a non-profit,&rdquo; said Levenson.<img align="right" alt="levenson1" height="226" src="image.aspx?id=6537&amp;width=400&amp;height=267" width="339" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Not only am I developing a great network among these professional women, but I&rsquo;m also flexing my leadership muscles by being the Board Secretary and understanding the importance of this role to keep a board moving forward.&rdquo;</p> <p> This summer, Zoe will take part in an internship with Boeing, where she hopes to develop an even deeper understanding of the technology and management of transportation.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s hard to believe I&rsquo;ve only been here for two months,&rdquo; continued Levenson. &ldquo;The Traffic21 Fellow has provided me additional opportunities to supplement the skill set gained from my full Heinz course work.</p> <p> &ldquo;Through all of my experiences thus far, I am excited to be a women entering the male dominated transportation field!&rdquo;</p> <p> The Women in Transportation Fellowship, offered in partnership with the Traffic21 Institute and the T-SET University Transportation Center (UTC) is awarded every year to an incoming student who is entering the <strong>Master of Science in Public Policy and Management </strong>(MSPPM) or <strong>Master of Information Systems Management</strong> (MISM) degree programs. It is awarded to an outstanding female student who has, within the standard application for admission, demonstrated an interest and commitment to Intelligent Transportation Systems.</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3203" target="">More Information about the Women in Transportation Fellowship &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">More Information about Traffic21 &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://utc.ices.cmu.edu/utc/index.html" target="_blank">More information about T-SET &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=72" target="">More Information about the Master of Information Systems and Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1756Mon, 15 Dec 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6536photo

]]>
New Strategic Partnerships Highlight Opportunities in Policy Educationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1755]]><p> PITTSBURGH, PA &ndash; Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College is proud to announce three new strategic partnerships aimed at providing new opportunities in graduate management education.&nbsp; The partnerships include Denison University as a Regional Education Partner and both the Chicano Latino Youth Leadership Project and the Government of Turkey&rsquo;s Ministry of Development as Organization&ndash;Based Partners.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re thrilled to announce these new partnerships,&rdquo; said Brenda Peyser, Associate Dean of School of Public Policy and Management at Heinz College.&nbsp; &ldquo;Diversity is essential to enriching intellectual exchanges and enhancing the graduate school experience. Partnerships with these three unique organizations further demonstrate our commitment to promoting diversity in our student body.&rdquo;</p> <p> With these partnerships, affiliates of these organizations and institutions gain access to significant financial support from the school. These three organizations are representative of the rich diversity in not only the Heinz College student body, but in the various perspectives one can find pursuing a graduate education at the Heinz College.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Denison Logo" height="50" src="image.aspx?id=4514&amp;width=200&amp;height=45" style="float: left;" width="222" />Denison University, located in Granville, Ohio, is one of the nation&rsquo;s leading liberal arts colleges. The university has earned a reputation for academic rigor and its commitment to preparing students for a lifetime of personal, professional and civic&nbsp;success. Denison students are known for their creative and innovative approach to problem-solving and decision-making.</p> <p> &ldquo;Over the years, Denison&rsquo;s alumni have frequently made a very positive impression on the faculty at Heinz College,&rdquo; said David Eber, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Heinz College.&nbsp; &ldquo;Denison&rsquo;s devotion to creative collaborative learning and civic engagement perfectly aligns with Heinz College&rsquo;s commitment to revolutionizing leadership and management education on the graduate level.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Denison University is an ideal educational partner for Heinz College.&rdquo;</p> <p> Another aspect of the unique graduate education that can be found at Heinz College is the varied experiences that the diverse student body is able to bring to the classroom.&nbsp; Heinz College&rsquo;s new partnership <img align="right" alt="TMoD Logo" height="150" src="image.aspx?id=4519&amp;width=225&amp;height=225" width="150" />with the Government of Turkey&rsquo;s Ministry of Development (TMoD) looks to bring this rich experience in running government organizations from across the ocean to the classroom in Pittsburgh.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s always exciting to admit students who are already working in government positions, both domestically and abroad,&rdquo; said Eber.&nbsp; &ldquo;Having already worked in the government in their home country, these students&rsquo; real-world experiences brings an in-depth perspective to both current students and faculty, enhancing the learning environment here at Heinz.&rdquo;</p> <p> Leadership is another important aspect of the Heinz College&rsquo;s graduate education. Heinz College&rsquo;s School of Public Policy and Management continually strives to not only be at the forefront of policy innovation and leadership; it endeavors to prepare the policy leaders of tomorrow. Heinz College&rsquo;s new partnership with the Chicano Latino Youth Leadership Project, Inc. (CLYLP) is another exciting opportunity to work with those future leaders.</p> <p> <img alt="cylyp_logo" src="image.aspx?id=5529&amp;width=200&amp;height=200" style="float: left; width: 150px; height: 150px; margin-left: 3px; margin-right: 3px;" />The CLYLP was organized in 1982 with the primary purpose of preparing students to participate in California&rsquo;s economic, social and political development. The CLYLP&rsquo;s new partnership with Heinz College exemplifies the school&rsquo;s commitment to promoting innovative decision-making and diverse perspectives in leadership across the public, non-profit and private sectors.</p> <p> &ldquo;We are honored by the investment in the CLYLP community being made by Carnegie Mellon University and Heinz College,&rdquo; said Fernando Ramirez, CLYLP Board President. &ldquo;This new partnership is a bridge to success for our organization, and now both Heinz College and CLYLP will be able to further enhance and develop a future in which California and all of its communities prosper as the result of a new generation of leadership.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;The CLYLP is a fantastic organization to partner with,&rdquo; added Eber. &ldquo;We share a commitment to the public policy process, as well as the development of future leaders in a wide variety of fields and disciplines.&rdquo;</p> <p> Heinz College is extrememly pround to announce these new partnerships and looks forward to seeing future policy leaders from all three of these organizations on campus starting next year.</p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=3424" target="">More information on the Denison University Partnership &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=3425" target="">More Information on the Government of Turkey&rsquo;s Ministry of Development Partnership &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=3423" target="">More information on the Chicano Latino Youth Leadership Project, Inc. Partnership &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1755Mon, 24 Nov 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=3050photo

]]>
Panoramic Visionhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1754]]><p> <em>This story first appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/computing/2014/fall/panoramic-vision.shtml" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> From death-defying athletic adventures to other once-in-a-lifetime moments, imagine video that can capture it all &mdash; literally. Thanks to Carnegie Mellon University spinout <a href="http://www.360fly.com/" target="_blank">360fly</a>, soon everyone will be able to catch life in the round, with interactive, one-shot, 360-degree panoramic videos.<br /> <br /> With a boost from a recent $17.8 million round of venture funding, 360fly (formerly known as EyeSee360) is gearing up for a spring 2015 launch of its new camera. The device will boast a unique 360-degree horizontal and 240-degree vertical view &mdash; the widest in the world.<br /> <br /> Apps will be android and iOS compatible with live 360-degree view, and the rugged, lightweight camera will be waterproof up to five ATMs. Orders are in from major big box stores and leading online retailers and the device is expected to be ready for sale in spring 2015, competitively priced with other popular action cameras.<br /> <br /> &quot;360fly doesn&#39;t just take a video. It adds a replay button to your world. Because your life is too glorious to be filtered, cropped or edited,&quot; said Amey Kanade (HNZ&#39;09), 360fly&#39;s director of marketing.<br /> <br /> &quot;It can fundamentally change the way people shoot, view and share video,&quot; Kanade said.<br /> <br /> Founded in 1998 by CTO Michael Rondinelli (CS&#39;01), 360fly moved from developing panoramic video to enable robotic perception to custom projects for industry and the military and the first consumer panoramic iPhone optic, GoPano.<br /> <br /> Kanade joined the company after graduation, eager for a startup experience where he could dive quickly into varied responsibilities. He got what he wanted. The software engineer rapidly found himself spending more time with customers than writing code, eventually running a crowdfunding campaign and now serving as director of marketing.<br /> <br /> While a student, the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Information Systems Management</a> graduate also took a number of classes in the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/art/" target="_blank">School of Art</a>, and found his diverse CMU training invaluable.<br /> <br /> &quot;With modern day marketing you really have to be part scientist and part artist,&quot; Kanade said. &quot;As an engineer by training on the marketing side, my entire CMU background is helping me now, both my strong platform of analytical skills and my artistic coursework.&quot;<br /> <br /> In the past year, the Pittsburgh-based company has burgeoned from seven employees to 25 and counting. The CMU spinout now numbers five CMU alumni employees.<br /> <br /> &quot;The people at Carnegie Mellon, the professors, students and staff, they push you to a different level,&quot; Kanade said. &quot;You&#39;re surrounded by so many smart people, you automatically feel the impetus of doing something better.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1754Mon, 10 Nov 2014 13:16:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4515photo

]]>
Heinz College Alumnus Named NASA CFOhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1753]]><p> WASHINGTON DC - David P. Radzanowski, an alumnus from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College (HNZ &rsquo;90), was recently confirmed by the Senate as Chief Financial Officer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).<br /> <br /> &ldquo;It really is an honor and privilege to be confirmed for such an important position,&ldquo; said Radzanowski.<br /> <br /> Before becoming CFO, Radzanowski served as Chief of Staff and principal advisor to NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr. Prior to that, he was the Deputy Associate Administrator for Program Integration for the Space Operations Mission Directorate where he had oversight responsibility for the administrative functions of the Directorate as well as Space Shuttle Transition and Retirement activities.<br /> <br /> He received a Meritorious Presidential Rank Award in 2009 and NASA&#39;s Outstanding Leadership Medal in 2011.<br /> <br /> As CFO, Radzanowski will be in charge of developing an $18 billion, budget which will then face Congressional approval, as well as managing all of NASA&rsquo;s business processes.&nbsp; &ldquo;It&rsquo;s no easy feat,&rdquo; said Radzanowski.&nbsp; &ldquo;When managing this large of an organization with this amount of money, you want to make sure you use it wisely.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Ultimately, I want to work towards leaving things in better shape than they were when I arrived.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Radzanowski credits the &ldquo;fantastic experience&rdquo; he had at Heinz College with preparing him for where he is today.&nbsp; &ldquo;It was an inflection point in my life,&rdquo; said Radzanowski.&nbsp; &ldquo;I was worried about entering the program after having such a quantitative background, but it offered such an easy transition into the realm of public policy.&nbsp; Carnegie Mellon University was so technologically forward at the time and the university offered such a great experience in fulfilling my needs.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Beyond the qualitative and quantitative coursework, Radzanowski cites many of the leadership-driven courses with helping him attain his goals.&nbsp; &ldquo;I remember the public speaking and creative writing classes very well,&rdquo; continued Radzanowski.&nbsp; &ldquo;Without being able to explain science and technology to people, especially in a position like mine, you won&rsquo;t be successful.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Ultimately, I came to Heinz College for a foundation and I left with real world skills that were designed for facing real world problems.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=134" target="">More information about the MSPPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1753Mon, 06 Nov 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4513photo

]]>
Heinz College Systems Project Serves as Neutral Ground for Political Partieshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1752]]><p> PITTSBURGH - Six graduate students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College are conducting a research project analyzing shifting voting trends in the region. The project, which is jointly sponsored by the Pennsylvania Democratic Party and the Republican Party of Allegheny County, leaves behind the typical political dialogue associated with elections and instead focuses on the data that each election presents and how each party can better utilize that information in the future.</p> <p> &ldquo;Allegheny County is interesting in that registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans more than 2 to 1.&rdquo; said Jon Nehlsen, Heinz College&rsquo;s Senior Director of External Relations.&nbsp; &ldquo;Yet Republicans still win some county and state wide races.</p> <p> &ldquo;The students wanted to understand this phenomenon and looked to the data available to find the answer.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team reasoned that Republicans could win races through superior voter turnout or if registered Democrats broke ranks and &ldquo;swing&rdquo; for Republican candidates.&nbsp; They are working on modeling the factors that cause area voters to turn out as well as analyzing the demographics of &ldquo;swing voters&rdquo;.</p> <p> Party leaders are interested in the results in hopes that the students might challenge some of their old assumptions about area voters and lend a fresh perspective from students, all in their 20&rsquo;s, none of whom originally hail from the region.&nbsp; &ldquo;Interacting with the students revealed to me several areas where both parties can advance the cause of good government by improving our communications and outreach to a younger audience,&rdquo; said Republican Chairman Jim Roddey.</p> <p> Among the insights that the students have uncovered is that political language on social media in this election year tends to be compartmentalized.&nbsp; For example, men and women may care about the same issues but they use very different language on social media to describe their concerns.&nbsp; Additionally, the students found that when political parties and advocacy groups push their agendas on Twitter, it appears to have little measurable resonance with individuals.</p> <p> The project also has the unique opportunity of being conducted during a gubernatorial election year in Pennsylvania.&nbsp; &ldquo;In today&#39;s political world, effective voter outreach through data mining is essential if you want to be successful,&rdquo; said Jim Burn, Chairman of the Democratic Party in PA.</p> <p> The students are hopeful that some of the insights they uncover will help the parties manage future elections.&nbsp; &ldquo;It was really interesting to find out how similar both parties really are,&rdquo; said project team member Geoffrey Arnold.&nbsp; &ldquo;Everyone is interested in &lsquo;swing voters&rsquo; as well as younger voters and how they approach elections.</p> <p> &ldquo;They&rsquo;re not so different, they just want different things.&rdquo;</p> <p> Arnold, 27, is from Lancaster PA making him the only student from the Commonwealth.&nbsp; The other team members and their hometowns are:</p> <p> Sahar Momand, Los Angeles CA</p> <p> Ji Zhang, Beijing, China</p> <p> Zach Palomo, Hondo TX</p> <p> Robert Saul, Tucson AZ</p> <p> Isaac Guzman, Mexico City</p> <p> The project has brought about some unprecedented bipartisan cooperation, especially for an election year. &ldquo;&quot;It was not only an opportunity for the two major political parties to come together to jointly work with the students but also a rewarding experience to be involved with bright, young men and women interested in better understanding the political process,&rdquo; said Roddey.</p> <p> &ldquo;It has been a pleasure working with the students and faculty at CMU along with Republican Chairman Jim Roddey on this project,&rdquo; added Burn.</p> <p> &ldquo;(The students) are spot on in their analysis of what Jim Roddey and I are looking to do by way of voter turnout, messaging and what is needed in order to effectuate an effective plan.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=134" target="">For more information about the Master of Public Policy Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1752Mon, 30 Oct 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4507photo

]]>
Heinz Alumna Anne Lewis Named Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvaniahttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1751]]><p> HARRISBURG&mdash; Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett and First Lady Susan Corbett recognized Anne Lewis, an alumna of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, as one of nine outstanding women from across the state receiving this year&rsquo;s <a href="http://distinguisheddaughtersofpa.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/10-21-14.pdf" target="_blank">Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania</a> award.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Each one of these women has shown a tremendous commitment to making the world around her a better place,&rdquo; said Gov. Corbett. &ldquo;It is my honor to today name them as the Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania. Their dedication, commitment, compassion and drive have impacted the lives of so many.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> The mission of Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania is to honor outstanding women for extraordinary service and contributions to the Commonwealth of PA. Since 1949, the Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania has celebrated women leaders from diverse backgrounds, including education, science, law, medicine, business, public service, philanthropy, humanities and the arts. The women are nominated to receive the honor by non-profit organizations within Pennsylvania.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Having lived my entire life in Pennsylvania and having devoted most of it to philanthropic work here, I couldn&#39;t imagine a greater honor,&rdquo; said Lewis. &ldquo;And when you look at the list of other Distinguished Daughters down through the years&mdash;from Pearl S. Buck to Annie Dillard&mdash;I find I&#39;m in some pretty impressive company. So it&#39;s also quite humbling.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> As a business leader, Anne Lewis is Board Chair and co-owner of Oxford Development Company, one of Pittsburgh&rsquo;s most prominent privately owned enterprises. Committed to the region, Anne gives back to the community though her work as a volunteer and member of various governing boards, including the Dean&rsquo;s Advisory Council at Heinz College.<br /> <br /> Lewis&rsquo; experience with Heinz College goes back further than her time on the Dean&rsquo;s Advisory Council.&nbsp; In 1990, Lewis earned a <a href="retCmsId=167" target="">Master of Public Management Degree</a> from Heinz that helped prepare her for her future achievements.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Although I was involved in philanthropy and non-profit organizations before I came to Heinz, I think my experience here helped equip me with the leadership skills to accomplish my goals,&rdquo; said. &ldquo;In my experience, a lot of charitable organizations have noble ambitions and wonderful ideas, but it takes institutional knowledge, like what I received at Heinz College, and an ability to read the public policy &lsquo;terrain&rsquo; to turn those visions into reality.</p> <p> &ldquo;I don&#39;t know of a school anywhere that does a better job of providing the indispensable analytical skills you need to make a difference.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=167" target="">More information on the MPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1751Mon, 29 Oct 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4506photo

]]>
Dean Ramayya Krishnan to Speak on Data Analytics at Inaugural KL Converge Conferencehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1750]]><p> The Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) is hosting an inaugural three-day KL Converge 2014 conference in Kuala Lumpur.&nbsp; The conference, which is expecting more that 20,000 visitors, looks to provide a new platform for multimedia, communications, content and creative industry players to share ideas and create new opportunities in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.<br /> <br /> One of the tools necessary to achieve this is Big Data and the analytical tools to get the most out of it.&nbsp; Which is why the KL Converge conference turned to Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College and a leader in the field of data analytics, to give a keynote speech on the topic.<br /> <br /> Dean Krishnan&rsquo;s keynote speech, &ldquo;All Data Big and Small; Data Analytics and You&rdquo;, will be presented to both the conference and to ministers from nine of the ASEAN countries.&nbsp; Dean Krishnan&rsquo;s primary focus is on how to enable technological advances through policy and innovation, through identification of tech and data &ldquo;enablers&rdquo; and how they are able to innovate and advance.<br /> <br /> Big Data can be a valuable tool for economic development in the Southeast Asian region.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re in the midst of a &lsquo;Data Tsunami&rsquo;,&rdquo; said Krishnan.&nbsp; &ldquo;There has been explosive growth in the size complexity and rates in which we can gather data.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Enabled by mobile phones, social media, email, videos, images, click streams, Internet transactions and the increasing prevalence of sensors, Krishnan points out that we are in an &ldquo;Age of Data&rdquo;, where data can be used to create actionable information leading to timely and more informed decisions.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;By coupling roadway sensors, traffic cameras, and individuals&rsquo; GPS devices, we can reduce traffic congestion and generate significant savings in time and fuel costs,&rdquo; said Krishnan.&nbsp; &ldquo;We can transform formal and informal education, we can engender economic development with mobile banking in rural markets, we can even save lives by developing methods of accurately predicting natural disasters.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> &ldquo;From all of this data, we derive knowledge which then leads to action.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Krishnan continues that by integrating this new data with &ldquo;legacy&rdquo; data, such as information from public health and statistical agencies, countries can better ascertain the data that is actionable for them, bringing about real change.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;We need to be problem driven,&rdquo; concluded Krishnan.&nbsp; &ldquo;We need to support both bottom up and strategic planning on problems and initiatives that are likely to benefit from data analytics and enable their use of these technologies.<br /> <br /> Krishnan&rsquo;s keynote speech at KL Converge will take place today, September 19th.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://klconverge.com/" target="_blank">For more info on KL Converge &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1750Mon, 19 Sep 2014 12:41:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=2729photo

]]>