Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College Heinz College Hosts U.S. Senatorial Debatehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3830]]>http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3830Mon, 04 Feb 2016 14:01:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10094photo

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Congressional Candidate and Alum | Addresses Heinz College Studentshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3829]]><p> <a href="http://www.joelrubinforcongress.com/" target="_blank">Joel Rubin</a> is no stranger to conflict. As staffer, advocate, and politician, he has maintained a resolutely progressive stance on hot-button issues concerning energy, the economy, and foreign policy. An outspoken advocate of President Obama&rsquo;s nuclear deal with Iran, Rubin was also one of the first individuals to testify to Congress during the Benghazi hearings in 2015.</p> <p> Rubin says his confidence and conviction in the face of potential conflict and criticism are due in large part to the data-driven strategy he began developing as a student at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> nearly 18 years ago.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a Heinz thing maybe, but I&rsquo;ve always maintained that the best ways to win advocacy arguments is to have the data,&rdquo; he said in a recent appearance before a crowd of Heinz College students and faculty. &ldquo;When the data is on your side, you&rsquo;ve got the high ground.&rdquo;</p> <p> But for that data to win the day, it must be grounded in a firm grasp of the issues at stake.</p> <p> &ldquo;If you&rsquo;re meeting a member of Congress to present an issue, you might find you only have minutes to make your point,&rdquo; explained Rubin. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s important to know the data so well that you can make the most of the time you&rsquo;ve got to communicate the value and the meaning of that data.&rdquo;</p> <p> It&rsquo;s a strategy that has served him well. Less than two decades have passed since Rubin graduated with a joint degree in Public Policy and Management and Business Administration from CMU&rsquo;s Heinz College and the Tepper School of Business, respectively. But in that time, he has compiled an impressive &ndash; and impressively diverse &ndash; r&eacute;sum&eacute;. &nbsp;</p> <p> After starting his career as a Presidential Management Fellow, Rubin spent seven years as a career&nbsp;officer at the <a href="http://www.usaid.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Agency for International Development</a>, the <a href="http://energy.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Department of Energy</a>, and the <a href="http://www.state.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Department of State</a>, working on everything from political and&nbsp;military affairs to energy and international development. As a congressional aide, he won a major bipartisan award for his work&nbsp;on foreign policy and defense&nbsp;before entering&nbsp;the advocacy sector, where he was a leader at organizations such as <a href="http://www.ploughshares.org/" target="_blank">Ploughshares Fund</a>, the <a href="http://nsnetwork.org/" target="_blank">National Security Network</a>, and <a href="http://jstreet.org/" target="_blank">J Street</a> on issues ranging from national security and the Middle East to nuclear proliferation.</p> <p> &ldquo;Knowing what job you&rsquo;re going to wind up in is impossible, so you have to trust yourself, and follow your instincts,&rdquo; he told the Heinz audience. &ldquo;The skills I got a Heinz have given me the power to make a difference &ndash; to experience a life in public service. To be in that space is a real honor, and it&rsquo;s not something I take lightly.&rdquo;</p> <p> Just before running for Congress, Rubin was a&nbsp;Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Obama Administration in the State Department&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.state.gov/s/h/" target="_blank">Bureau of Legislative Affairs</a>, where he served as the Department&rsquo;s chief liaison to the U.S. House of Representatives, managing the Department&rsquo;s day-to-day interactions with&nbsp;oversight committees, House leadership, and other governmental agencies on national security topics of interest&nbsp;to the House.</p> <p> In his current bid to represent Maryland&rsquo;s 8<sup>th</sup> Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives, Rubin is driven by a firm belief that each of these institutions, especially Congress, can do a better job of serving the American people.</p> <p> &ldquo;Frankly, Congress is broken,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;If you look at climate talks, it&rsquo;s the only party in the global community that doesn&rsquo;t support dealing with climate change. This can&rsquo;t stand, but it can be fixed. And it&rsquo;s imperative that people in Washington work to fix it.&rdquo;</p> <p> When asked by the students how he would go about fixing Congress as a new member with such a progressive record, Rubin replied that in addition to having the data on his side, he would act with a combination of patience and conviction.</p> <p> &ldquo;If you have a progressive agenda, you need to think about how you&rsquo;re going to shape it over time, because that&rsquo;s when real change occurs,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;And that means you will need to be prepared to engage in many difficult debates.&rdquo;</p> <p> Throughout such debates, Rubin has certainly taken a lot of heat for his opinions. Yet his track record for working across party lines speaks to his commitment to compromise and diplomacy.</p> <p> &ldquo;Even when we disagree on policy, it isn&rsquo;t personal, and it doesn&rsquo;t have to be personal,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;There are lots of areas of intersection where we can work together to get things done for the American people.&rdquo;</p> <p> And according to Rubin, it&rsquo;s never too early to start. Rather than wait to find their ideal careers post-graduation, he encouraged the students to take advantage of the range tools at their disposal, such as social media and online petitions, to begin enacting change in the world today.</p> <p> &ldquo;Each of you have more impact and influence now as students than any of us could have imagined,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Use it. You, individually, can make a difference, and you, individually, are needed.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MSPPM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.joelrubinforcongress.com/" target="_blank">Learn more about Joel Rubin &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3829Mon, 04 Feb 2016 14:35:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10093photo

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Student Group Bringing Big Data to Citieshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3832]]><p> Students for Urban Data Systems (SUDS) is a new student group that brings together the vast (and growing) array of disciplines related to cities adapting new methods of &ldquo;big data&rdquo; collection and analysis to improve their delivery of municipal services, from providing water and police protection to repairing infrastructure.</p> <p> Since its founding in August 2015, SUDS has grown to over 100 members representing five different colleges and 20 different programs across CMU. From urban design to electrical engineering, policy to philosophy, our students work in diverse teams tackling some of Pittsburgh&rsquo;s most pressing issues, including police accountability, bicycle usage, and combined sewer overflows.</p> <p> To date, SUDS has brought out 50 students for both its first membership meeting and its initial &quot;hack night&quot; (see pictures below), and is preparing for its first speaker event on November 13 called &quot;Democratizing Data.&quot; The event, which will be co-sponsored by the Smart Growth club, will feature Laura Meixell (Analytics and Strategy Manager for the City of Pittsburgh), Bob Gradeck (Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center), and Daniel Neill (CMU Professor) discussing the importance of cities making data accessible, and giving real-world examples of how Pittsburgh is incorporating data into its decision making. In an effort to expand student involvement, SUDS developed a website where students can host their data projects and sponsored a Systems Synthesis project for Heinz College students. It also regularly hosts nationally recognized speakers on the topics of open data, the Internet of Things, and smart infrastructure. To keep up to date with SUDS or to get in touch, you can check them out at <a href="http://suds-cmu.org" target="_blank">suds-cmu.org</a> or on Twitter @sudscmu.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3832Mon, 04 Feb 2016 19:58:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=0photo

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Recent Master of Medical Management Graduates Take their Careers to the Next Levelhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3828]]><p> A <a href="http://hbr.org/2015/04/the-skills-doctors-need-to-be-effective-executives" target="_blank">recent Harvard Business Review article</a> outlined the rapid growth that is currently taking place within the health care industry. With significant job growth, clinicians are being called upon to lead these new health care enterprises.</p> <p> &ldquo;Maximizing the effectiveness of physicians&hellip;in these positions, however, will require different skills than the ones they developed during their clinical training,&rdquo; writes Sachin H. Jain, M.D. He points to &ldquo;operations management and execution,&rdquo; &ldquo;people leadership,&rdquo; and &ldquo;setting and defining strategy&rdquo; as three skills that are critical to the success of clinicians as they make the transition into management positions, and assume &ldquo;a higher level of influence in the business of health care than ever before.&rdquo;</p> <p> To face these new challenges, physicians need an education that is specifically designed to help them excel in their new roles. The <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/medical-management-mmm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Medical Management (MMM) program</a> at CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> arms physicians with leadership and management skills they need to lead today&rsquo;s health care organizations, and to shape the future of tomorrow&rsquo;s health care industry.</p> <p> Led by world-renowned <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> faculty members, as well as experienced health care leaders and practitioners, the MMM is an 18-month intensive program, delivered in a hybrid format of four on-site resident weeks combined with distance education. The program&rsquo;s core competencies address effective leadership, strategy, and management skills that are essential to future physician leaders engaged in the business of health care.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Lawrence Nycum" src="image.aspx?id=10087" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />&ldquo;You get a lot of core and content expertise within the business side of medicine,&rdquo; said Dr. Lawrence Nycum, who graduated from the MMM program in the spring of 2015. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a real &lsquo;rubber-hits-the-road&rsquo; program that meets executives&rsquo; needs, as well as an exceptional opportunity to learn from and engage with thought leaders from around the country.&rdquo;</p> <p> Nycum is no stranger to leadership positions in the medical field, having served as chief of staff and medical staff president for <a href="http://www.novanthealth.org/" target="_blank">Novant Health</a> medical staff services in Winston-Salem, N.C., where he was also medical director of its large, multispecialty oncology practice. He says his enrollment in the MMM program was integral to his most recent promotion, as senior vice-president of medical affairs for the Winston-Salem market.</p> <p> &ldquo;If you want to excel in your career, if you want to become the content expert, the thought leader, the person people come to when they have an issue regarding health care, then enroll in the MMM program at Carnegie Mellon University,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> &ldquo;It has made me much more effective in what I do,&rdquo; agreed Dr. Franziska Jovin, Vice President for Medical Affairs at <a href="http://www.upmc.com/locations/hospitals/presbyterian/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">UPMC Presbyterian</a>, and Vice Chair for Quality and Patient Safety at the <a href="http://www.dept-med.pitt.edu/" target="_blank">University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine</a>. &ldquo;In addition to my leadership roles, I mentor a lot of residents and junior faculty. I find that my mentorship has improved significantly, and that I&rsquo;m more successful overall.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Franziska Jovin" src="image.aspx?id=10088" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: right;" />Jovin also graduated from the MMM program last spring. In addition to her mentoring and leadership roles, she sits on the committee for patient safety at UPMC, and is heavily involved in operations on the inpatient side. She says she chose the MMM because it is tailored specifically to hospital-based leaders in the medical profession, who seek to become more effective administrators and leaders.</p> <p> With concentrations in leadership, strategy, and management, the MMM provides students with practical tools with real-world applications. Ingrained in the program&rsquo;s curriculum are the fundamental leadership skills that help separate successful leaders and managers from the pack. With these skills, graduates from the program are well positioned to further their careers and attain leadership roles in health care.</p> <p> &ldquo;I tell all my trainees that they have to think about the business aspect of medicine the way they would think of specializing in a medical specialty,&rdquo; said Jovin. &ldquo;There is a need for leadership from the physicians. And I really think that the MMM can equip you well, no matter where you want to go.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/medical-management-mmm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MMM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3828Mon, 03 Feb 2016 13:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10071photo

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Grant Oliphant Shares | Leadership Strategies at Heinz Collegehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3825]]><p> Recently, dozens of <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a> students and faculty members gathered in Hamburg Hall to hear Grant Oliphant recount his personal public policy and leadership journey. A philanthropist, community leader, and President of <a href="http://www.heinz.org/" target="_blank">The Heinz Endowments</a>, Oliphant shared his insights on what it means to lead in today&rsquo;s society.</p> <p> &ldquo;The defining challenge of our times is how we reacquaint ourselves with a relationship with our broader humanity,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> For Oliphant, the first and most crucial step to doing this is to approach leadership with full awareness. This includes having an awareness of your own story &ndash; both how it empowers you and limits you.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;So many of you are here because of stories that control you, and you don&rsquo;t even know it. You will be a more powerful leader if you can understand those stories,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> Oliphant first began to appreciate the value of full awareness when he was hired as Press Secretary for the late Senator John Heinz in 1988. As Oliphant recalled, Senator Heinz&rsquo;s own story was one of incredible work ethic. And for Oliphant, Senator Heinz&rsquo;s unwavering commitment to public service was infectious.</p> <p> &ldquo;John&rsquo;s mantra was action over talk,&rdquo; said Oliphant. &ldquo;He never focused on the certainty of calamity. Instead, he focused on finding a path forward.&rdquo;</p> <p> For Senator Heinz, one way was holding countless town hall meetings in order to learn what his constituents needed from him.</p> <p> &ldquo;Most of the time when we&rsquo;re not hearing people, it&rsquo;s not because they&rsquo;re not speaking. It&rsquo;s because we&rsquo;re not listening,&rdquo; said Oliphant. &ldquo;The responsibility of a leader is to step outside your comfort zone and be willing to hear what you don&rsquo;t want to hear. John believed, emphatically, that this was the way a leader should lead.&rdquo;</p> <p> And while Senator Heinz listened &ndash; to his cabinet members, to his fellow politicians, and to his constituents &ndash; Oliphant said that one of the things he most admired Senator Heinz for was the way he would step to the forefront in working to resolve issues that seemed impossible or unpopular.</p> <p> Oliphant continued to work closely alongside Senator Heinz for three years, until April 4, 1991, when a plane bound for Philadelphia collided with a helicopter, killing the senator and six others.</p> <p> &ldquo;Those three years introduced me to a life of purpose in a way that nothing else could,&rdquo; said Oliphant. &ldquo;Partly because of the model of who Senator Heinz was and how he approached his work, but partly in the way he died.&rdquo;</p> <p> Oliphant explained that, in some ways, the reason Senator Heinz died when he did was because of his unwavering commitment to his constituents. He had been en route to a series of town hall meetings in Philadelphia when the plane went down.&nbsp;</p> <p> Though the crash ended Oliphant&rsquo;s three-year tenure as press secretary, it launched him into a life of connection to Senator Heinz&rsquo;s family and philanthropy. Oliphant joined The Heinz Endowments in 1993 as Director of Communications for the foundation, ultimately becoming Vice President of Programs and Planning. In this role, Oliphant was responsible for managing the Endowments&rsquo; $70 million-plus annual grantmaking portfolio. He then served as CEO of <a href="http://pittsburghfoundation.org/" target="_blank">The Pittsburgh Foundation</a> for six years prior to rejoining the Heinz Endowments at President in 2014.</p> <p> Since that time, he has spearheaded numerous initiatives designed to better the community. In August, Pittsburgh Magazine named him t<a href="http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Pittsburgh-Magazine/September-2015/50-Most-Powerful-People-in-Pittsburgh/" target="_blank">he most powerful person in Pittsburgh</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p> Yet, in his speech, Oliphant was quick to point out this article, and others of its ilk, may be perpetuating a myth about leadership that isn&rsquo;t entirely accurate.</p> <p> &ldquo;There is actually no most powerful person,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Great leaders do not imagine themselves as heroic, sole individuals. They see themselves as part of a system, as dependent on one another for their success.&rdquo;</p> <p> That&rsquo;s why cooperation and collaboration matter, now more than ever. Today&rsquo;s society is at an inflection point, Oliphant said, referencing climate change, widening global inequity, the rise of extremism, and increasing incidents of violence used to oppress.</p> <p> &ldquo;The notion that humanity can sit by and ignore these issues is foolish,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;When policymakers are afraid to stand up and say, &lsquo;yes, the world is warming, and we&rsquo;re the cause of it,&rsquo; they&rsquo;re impeding the opportunity for the rest of us to solve the problem. Great leaders don&rsquo;t do that. They acknowledge the data and they work with it.&rdquo;</p> <p> In closing his speech, Oliphant urged his audience to be honest about the challenges they face in moving forward and making real progress.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re making choices right now that will affect the future of this community for generations, whether we&rsquo;re conscious about them or not,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;A full awareness of those connections is what true leaders bring to the table.&rdquo;</p> <p> Oliphant then addressed Heinz College students directly, saying,&ldquo;the sorts of leaders I hope you&rsquo;ll be are ones who appreciate complexity, who are willing to confront data, and will try to create the sort of world in which we can work together to solve the problems that most bedevil us.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the Heinz College School of Public Policy and Management &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.org/" target="_blank">Learn more about The Heinz Endowments &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=3825Mon, 27 Jan 2016 13:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10066photo

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The Sundance Film Festival | Experiencehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2823]]><p style="text-align: right;"> <em>This story was originally published on the</em>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">www.cmu.edu</a>&nbsp;<em>website. It is republished with permission.</em></p> <p> On a snowy January morning in 2012, Roxanne Benjamin met with students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/entertainment-industry-management-meim/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Entertainment Industry Management (MEIM)</a> program in a condo at the Sundance Film Festival on one of the most important days of her career.</p> <p> Benjamin, a MEIM alumna and emerging film producer, was preparing to screen a midnight showing of her first feature film, &ldquo;V/H/S,&rdquo; at the festival in Park City, Utah.</p> <p> Later that night, in a packed theater of 600 patrons &mdash; including more than 20 MEIM students &mdash; &ldquo;V/H/S&rdquo; premiered. A few days later, Benjamin&rsquo;s hard work paid off. The Hollywood Reporter was one publication to share the <a href="http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/risky-business/sundance-2012-magnolia-pictures-vhs-284886" target="_blank">good news</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;&lsquo;V/H/S&rsquo; was acquired for north of a million dollars by Magnolia Pictures,&rdquo; recalled Dan Green, MEIM program director.</p> <p> Engaging with a film producer who is shopping a major project is just one of the many experiential learning opportunities more than 150 students have enjoyed while attending the <a href="http://www.sundance.org/festivals/sundance-film-festival" target="_blank">Sundance Film Festival</a> as part of the MEIM program.</p> <p> Since 2009, MEIM students have traveled from Los Angeles, where they spend their second year taking classes while working for leading entertainment companies, to Park City for the annual festival.</p> <p> The Sundance Film Festival has introduced global audiences to some of the most groundbreaking films of the past three decades, including &ldquo;Boyhood,&rdquo; &ldquo;Beasts of the Southern Wild,&rdquo; &ldquo;Fruitvale Station,&rdquo; &ldquo;Brooklyn,&rdquo; &ldquo;The Cove,&rdquo; &ldquo;Me and Earl and the Dying Girl,&rdquo; &ldquo;Super Size Me,&rdquo; &ldquo;Little Miss Sunshine,&rdquo; &ldquo;sex, lies, and videotape,&rdquo; and &ldquo;Reservoir Dogs.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Attending the Sundance Film Festival gives MEIM students the chance to network with top industry professionals at one of the industry&#39;s most prestigious events,&rdquo; said John Tarnoff, MEIM head of Industry Relations. &nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;The biggest reason the general public goes to the Sundance Film Festival is to see, talk about and experience films,&rdquo; Green said. &ldquo;But for those in the entertainment industry, the festival represents a buying and selling market.</p> <p> &ldquo;Our students attend a lot of events throughout the course of each day. You can start watching films at 7 a.m., and the last film screening is at midnight. So you have lots of opportunities to see films, attend networking parties, learn from workshops, and mingle with the movers and shakers within the industry.&rdquo;</p> <p> The MEIM program facilitates many of these opportunities for the students by being an official Sundance Institute sponsor. The program also organizes various workshops and seminars where industry professionals meet with the students face-to-face to share their experiences and field questions.</p> <p> &ldquo;The exclusive seminars the MEIM program conducts for its students let them interact with the deal-makers themselves, and learn the ins and outs of the acquisition and distribution deals happening in real time,&rdquo; Tarnoff said.</p> <p> &ldquo;These are people who are working in the industry and carve out an hour or two to talk to our students,&rdquo; Green said. &ldquo;The students get an inside look at what industry trends are emerging at the festival.&rdquo;</p> <p> This year, a <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> faculty member will further enhance CMU&rsquo;s presence at the Sundance Film Festival by sharing his expertise with entertainment industry professionals.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=92" target="_blank">Michael D. Smith</a>, professor of Information Technology and Marketing at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, will be the Exclusive Data Keynote Speaker at the Sundance Institute <a href="http://sff16-artistservicesworkshop.splashthat.com/" target="_blank">Artist Services Workshop</a>, hosted by Vimeo on Jan. 25.</p> <p> To further the business aims of its independent filmmakers, the Sundance Institute created the Artist Services program to empower filmmakers and build community around opportunities to fund and distribute films in the digital age. With the rise of new platforms and outlets that make distribution channels more accessible, Artist Services has partnered with emerging companies like Kickstarter, Vimeo, Tugg, and VHX, as well as Netflix, Hulu, Apple, Amazon Instant Video and others, to facilitate greater (and affordable) access to these new services. Artist Services works closely with Institute supported artists, helping them to navigate the rapidly evolving independent distribution landscape, and to better strategize their funding, marketing and distribution campaigns.</p> <p> Smith and his Heinz College colleague Rahul Telang have presented their extensive research on digital piracy and its effects on consumer behavior to Congress and at the White House. At the Sundance Film Festival, Smith will speak about how piracy specifically affects independent films.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re honored to have Mike Smith deliver this exclusive&nbsp;keynote at the 2016 Artist Services Workshop at the Sundance Film Festival,&rdquo; said Joseph Beyer, director of Digital Initiatives for the Sundance Institute. &ldquo;The research that Mike and his colleagues have done will help empower independent filmmakers in effectively distributing and monetizing their work and also to educate them on how piracy affects those goals.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I think you can make a strong case that the independent filmmaker is the one who is placed most at risk by piracy,&rdquo; Smith said. &ldquo;Independent films are disproportionately the ones where lost revenue from piracy can mean the difference between a profitable and an unprofitable project.&rdquo;</p> <p> As part of the keynote, Smith will present excerpts from his forthcoming book, &ldquo;Streaming, Sharing, Stealing: Big Data and the Future of Entertainment,&rdquo; coming in the fall of 2016 from the MIT Press.</p> <p> &ldquo;I&rsquo;m going to be talking about what I call the &lsquo;five myths&rsquo; of piracy, one of which states that you can&rsquo;t compete with free piracy,&rdquo; Smith said. &ldquo;We are learning from the data that there are some things you can do effectively in terms of how you market your content that will help combat piracy.&rdquo;</p> <p> The trip marks Smith&rsquo;s first to the Sundance Film Festival, and he said he is looking forward to sharing his research with colleagues, interacting other festivalgoers, and checking out some the films and talkback sessions with the producers and directors to get more insight about their work.</p> <p> &ldquo;I am hugely excited about attending and learning from great storytellers,&rdquo; Smith said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve always been a bit of a geek about director&rsquo;s commentaries and learning how these artists craft their stories, so this will be even geekier!&rdquo;</p> <p> For Green, the chance for current students to attend festivals like the Sundance Film Festival, S and the Cannes Film Festival is an invaluable part of their learning experience as they prepare to move into the entertainment field.</p> <p> &ldquo;You can&rsquo;t quantify the sum total of the value of the relationships that the students cultivate at these festivals,&rdquo; Green said. &ldquo;Students enjoy a unique experience when they can have conversations with industry professionals who are working in the specific areas of the industry they are hoping to break into, whether that&rsquo;s film development, acquisitions, finances or distribution. And being able to see the films that the public will see several months later, that haven&rsquo;t been marketed yet, really gives them an edge as they prepare to enter the entertainment workforce.&rdquo;</p> <p> Related:</p> <p> <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2016/january/tallulah.html" target="_blank">CMU alumna Sian Heder is the creative force behind one of the most anticipated films of this year&#39;s Sundance Film Festival &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/entertainment-industry-management-meim/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MEIM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=92" target="_blank">Learn more about Michael D. Smith &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://sff16-artistservicesworkshop.splashthat.com/" target="_blank">See the full schedule for the Artist Services Workshop &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.sundance.org/festivals/sundance-film-festival" target="_blank">Learn more about the Sundance Film Festival &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2823Mon, 22 Jan 2016 11:15:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10062photo

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MMM Alumnus Helps Bring World-Class Medical Care to the Middle Easthttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2822]]><p> Marc Harrison (MMM &rsquo;07) knows the importance of good medical care, both personally and professionally.</p> <p> A Pittsburgh native and <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a> alumnus, Marc has worked at <a href="http://my.clevelandclinic.org/" target="_blank">Cleveland Clinic</a> since 1999, where he has served as Chairman of the Department of Pediatric Care, Director of Medical Operations, and Chief Medical Officer. And in 2016, it will be nearly a year since he recovered from the bladder cancer that threatened to take his life.</p> <p> &ldquo;Cancer gave me a new perspective on everything,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;When you&rsquo;ve been a patient yourself, and know what that experience is like, it helps you know what people are looking for in a leader.&rdquo;</p> <p> According to Harrison, a strong physician leader must be able to not only clearly articulate a mission, but to also help individuals at every level of the organization understand how they fit into that mission, and how they can help drive it forward.</p> <p> &ldquo;When you can achieve that, you can really get some amazing work done, and some incredible things accomplished,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> Indeed, in his most recent role as CEO of <a href="http://www.clevelandclinicabudhabi.ae/en/pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi</a>, Harrison has accomplished incredible things, leading the evolution of the project from concept to fully-fledged operational quaternary medical center, the first of its kind to exist outside North America.</p> <p> Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi&rsquo;s mission is to promote overall wellness in its patients and to deliver world-class medical care, reducing the need for patients to travel abroad for treatment.</p> <p> &ldquo;The idea of bringing this level of care to a part of the world that didn&rsquo;t have it was very meaningful to me,&rdquo; said Harrison. &ldquo;That sense that we as an organization are changing cultural values and are becoming the preferred source of care in the community means a lot.&rdquo;</p> <p> Harrison says Cleveland Clinic chose Abu Dhabi as the site for its first major international venture because the city&rsquo;s leadership had a true appetite for the Clinic&rsquo;s innovative vision. Having chosen a site, the Clinic partnered with <a href="http://www.mubadala.com/" target="_blank">Mubadala</a>, a government-owned investment and development company committed to supporting the growth of a dynamic and diversified United Arab Emirates economy.</p> <p> &ldquo;Mubadala approaches its development projects with double bottom lines: financial stability and societal good,&rdquo; Harrison said of the company. &ldquo;So it was really a perfect match.&rdquo;</p> <p> Harrison takes a similar, double-bottom-line approach to his own career, prioritizing a combination of technical acumen and strong leadership skills, which he believes are equally vital to his own success. He also emphasizes the importance of developing competencies in strategy and management to become a stronger physician leader.</p> <p> While the quantitative, technical, and analytics-based skills he has gained over the years have proven to be extremely valuable, Harrison says it&rsquo;s the lessons in leadership and networking he&rsquo;s learned that continue to have the greatest impact on his career, now more than ever. In October, Harrison was named Cleveland Clinic&rsquo;s Chief of International Business Development.&nbsp;</p> <p> &ldquo;Relationships matter everywhere, but nowhere more so than in the Middle East,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;This new position will allow me to develop and maintain Emirate relations over time, which is so important.&rdquo;</p> <p> In this new position, Harrison, together with his executive team, will begin to develop and execute the Cleveland Clinic&rsquo;s global strategy, so that more people around the world will have access to the state-of-the-art medical care the clinic provides.</p> <p> Yet despite the cultural nuances that come with working in a community halfway across the globe, Harrison says that what has surprised him most is how much people from different countries have universal goals.</p> <p> &ldquo;When you come right down to it, every patient wants the same things,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;They want to get better, they want great care, they want confidence in the team, and they want to be treated with respect. Those universal realities are much more powerful than any cultural differences.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/medical-management-mmm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MMM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2822Mon, 08 Jan 2016 14:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10051photo

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Reaping the Mutual Benefits of Creative Collaborationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2821]]><p> Imagine a future where algorithms can help public officials solve problems &ndash; like rising crime and disease outbreaks &ndash; not in years, but in seconds.</p> <p> For Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://epdlab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Event and Pattern Detection Laboratory (EPD Lab)</a>, the future is now. That was <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=70" target="_blank">Daniel B. Neill&rsquo;s</a> message during a recent presentation to leaders from the <a href="http://www.pwc.com/" target="_blank">PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)</a> Analytics Group on the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">CMU</a> campus.</p> <p> Neill, EPD Lab Director and Associate Professor of Information Systems at the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, explained to the 50 PwC leaders in attendance how researchers at Heinz have been applying machine learning to improve public health, safety, and security.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s increasingly urgent that we respond to these societal problems,&rdquo; said Neill. &ldquo;Fortunately, we now have both the data and the methods that we need to address them.&rdquo;</p> <p> One application of this machine learning-based research is disease surveillance. The EPD Lab&rsquo;s goal for one of its ongoing projects is to help public health officials detect and characterize outbreaks much more quickly than in the past, enabling them to make better, more informed decisions about how to control the spread of disease and, ultimately, prevent future outbreaks.&nbsp;</p> <p> No matter the disease, the earlier in the outbreak it is detected, the more effective the treatment and public health response will be. But because early symptoms of many illnesses tend to be nonspecific, there is typically a substantial lag time between the initial symptoms of a disease and its definitive diagnosis.</p> <p> But as Neill explained, by observing changes in people&rsquo;s behavior in a specific region, such as buying more over-the-counter medications, skipping work or school, or searching symptoms on the Internet, data helps predict outbreaks &ndash; which will make a big difference in early detection, treatment, and prevention, potentially saving thousands or millions of lives.</p> <p> The EPD Lab has been working with the <a href="http://www.ncdhhs.gov/" target="_blank">North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services</a> and with <a href="http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/home/home.shtml" target="_blank">New York City&rsquo;s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene</a> to develop a method for detecting novel emerging infections with unusual patterns of symptoms, in the hopes of reducing cost to society both in lives and money. While the EPD Lab&rsquo;s detection approaches are able to identify rare or previously unseen diseases, they can also be used to respond to more commonplace outbreaks, such as influenza or the common cold.</p> <p> Just as machine learning can predict illness and prevent the spread of disease, it can also help fight crime. Since 2009, the EPD Lab has been working with the <a href="http://home.chicagopolice.org/" target="_blank">Chicago Police Department</a> to develop CrimeScan, a software program that allows local law enforcement officials to predict and prevent emerging hotspots of violent crime.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re not just identifying bad neighborhoods &ndash; police already know where those are,&rdquo; said Neill. &ldquo;What we are working on is how to predict newly emergent hotspots of violence, by observing how neighborhoods and crime patterns can change.&rdquo;</p> <p> CrimeScan works by tracking targeted data like 911 calls made in an area, and then using that data to detect and anticipate trends. Neill says the program can make accurate predictions about emergent hotspots up to about a week in advance. By running the CrimeScan software twice a day, law enforcement officials have been able to successfully predict crime hotspots and seize illegal weapons in the area before crimes were committed.&nbsp;</p> <p> The EPD Lab hopes to collaborate with the PwC Analytics Group in the future to conduct further research and develop additional machine learning systems that will provide innovative, tangible solutions to challenges in the areas of public health, safety, and security.</p> <p> &ldquo;Collaboration between Heinz College and private sector partners gives our student and faculty researchers vital opportunities to work toward solving some of the most pressing societal problems facing the world today,&rdquo; said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Heinz College. &ldquo;Partnerships like these benefit the organizations involved and, more importantly, they improve society as a whole.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://epdlab.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Learn more about the EPD Lab &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2821Mon, 06 Jan 2016 14:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10042photo

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Sean Bowie Hopes to Bring his Commitment to Education to the Arizona State Senatehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2820]]><p> If there&rsquo;s one thing <a href="http://www.seanbowieforaz.com/" target="_blank">Sean Bowie</a> (MSPPM &rsquo;13) cares about, it&rsquo;s making sure everyone has access to a quality education. Nowhere in the country is this a bigger challenge than in his home state of Arizona. In the seven years since he graduated with dual bachelor&rsquo;s degrees from Arizona State University (ASU), tuition rates in that state have risen 83 percent, while its public universities have experienced greater cuts in funding than anywhere else in the country.</p> <p> In his current role in the provost&rsquo;s office at ASU, Bowie already works daily to increase access to education by expanding need-based financial aid for working Arizona families, and making more resources available to first-year students. As a 2016 candidate for the Arizona State Senate in Legislative District 18, the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> alumnus plans to do even more.</p> <p> &ldquo;Our state simply cannot compete in a 21<sup>st</sup>-century economy by reducing investment in our state universities,&rdquo; said Bowie. &ldquo;Budgets are about priorities, and as Senator, nothing will be more important to me than investing in education.&rdquo;</p> <p> The way Bowie sees it, education and the economy are inextricably linked. He believes that recent cuts to higher education have hindered his home state&rsquo;s economic development by making it more difficult to recruit companies and lure young workers. By focusing on education, Bowie hopes to encourage investment and job growth that will strengthen Arizona&rsquo;s economy.</p> <p> Given his commitment to education, it isn&rsquo;t surprising that, once Bowie set his sights on a political career, his first step was to invest in his own education.</p> <p> &ldquo;The economy is definitely moving to a more skills-based workplace,&rdquo; said Bowie. &ldquo;I was looking for a strong quantitative master&rsquo;s in Public Policy program, and I was drawn to Heinz for its skills-based curriculum.&rdquo;</p> <p> The skills Bowie developed in the market-oriented <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM)</a> program at Heinz College appeal to a wide array of employers from the public, nonprofit, and private sectors. The program&rsquo;s curriculum integrates public policy, information technology, quantitative analysis, and management skills to prepare students to solve complex policy problems.</p> <p> In addition to this skill-oriented core curriculum, tailored elective coursework gives students the opportunity to select from a range of specializations &ndash; from <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/concentrations/environmental-policy/index.aspx" target="_blank">environmental policy</a>, to <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/concentrations/urban-and-regional-economic-development/index.aspx" target="_blank">economic development</a>, to <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/concentrations/international-trade-and-development/index.aspx" target="_blank">international trade</a>. Group projects and internship opportunities allow students to consistently apply what they&rsquo;ve learned in the classroom to create real-world solutions.</p> <p> And because the MSPPM program is offered in <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/msppm-track-options/index.aspx" target="_blank">three locations</a> &ndash; Pittsburgh, Washington, D.C., and Adelaide, Australia &ndash; students can take advantage of its strong core curriculum in a context that suits their career aspirations. By completing courses on the D.C. campus, Bowie was able to pursue his education while accruing relevant work experience and making important contacts.</p> <p> Now two years out of the program, Bowie says the MSPPM experience played an integral role in shaping him into the candidate he is today &ndash; and not just for the skills he developed in <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=57" target="_blank">Professor Pamela Lewis&rsquo;</a> course in <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=477" target="_blank">Strategic Presentation Skills</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;I think Professor Lewis would be proud of how far I&rsquo;ve come!&rdquo; Bowie said.</p> <p> Since earning his MSPPM in 2013, Bowie has worked with stakeholders and elected officials on a range of projects, including reforming education, expanding access to health care, and protecting Social Security. In each of these endeavors, Bowie says his goal has always been to make government more effective and responsive to the needs of an ever-evolving economy.</p> <p> Though he has always had a passion for public service, Bowie attributes much of his approach to public policy to his time spent at Heinz College.</p> <p> &ldquo;In so many ways, the MSPPM program helped me refine and sharpen my strategy,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;Many policy issues, particularly around the budget, demand rigorous quantitative training and analysis. At Heinz, I developed a marketable skill set that will continue to be in demand as the economy grows and becomes more reliant on technology.&rdquo;</p> <p> With his sights set firmly on the future, Bowie continues to be inspired by the familiar <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> slogan, proudly featured on his <a href="http://twitter.com/seanbowie" target="_blank">official Twitter account</a>, which he says perfectly encapsulates his passion for public service.</p> <p> &ldquo;My heart really <em>is </em>in the work,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;At the end of the day, I want to be known as someone who fights for good, sensible public policy and doesn&#39;t back down from doing the right thing. People will doubt you; say it&#39;s not your time yet. But if you have a real passion for public service, and want to use your skills to fight for good public policy, you owe it to your community and your state to get involved.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.seanbowieforaz.com/" target="_blank">Learn more about Sean Bowie&rsquo;s campaign &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MSPPM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2820Mon, 05 Jan 2016 10:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10041photo

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Dean Ramayya Krishnan | Honored with 2015 Nayudamma Awardhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2819]]><p> Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> and William W. and Ruth F. Cooper Professor of Management Science and Information Systems at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a>, is the 2015 recipient of the Nayudamma Centre for Development Alternatives (NCDA) Nayudamma Award.</p> <p> The NCDA presented the award to Krishnan at a special ceremony on December 21 at his undergraduate alma mater, the <a href="https://www.iitm.ac.in/" target="_blank">Indian Institute of Technology Madras</a> (IIT-Madras), in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Krishnan also delivered the 21<sup>st</sup> Professor Yelavarthy Nayudamma Memorial Lecture at the ceremony.</p> <p> The Nayudamma Award honors individuals for their significant contributions around the world in areas of sustainable development. Krishnan is being honored for his research and leadership in making data-driven decisions in key societal domains, including <a href="http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">transportation</a>, <a href="http://metro21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">smart cities</a>, and <a href="http://larc.smu.edu.sg/" target="_blank">living analytics</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;As a scholar, Krishnan&rsquo;s work on data-driven decision making in cyber physical environments is well known for its multi-disciplinary contributions to the fields of Operations Research and Information Systems. This work and that of his colleagues at the intersection of information technology, public policy and management is having a significant impact on organizations in both the public and private sectors via the multiple research centers he has helped establish at the University,&rdquo; said CMU Provost Farnam Jahanian. &ldquo;As dean of Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy, his work with our faculty exemplifies the university&rsquo;s commitment to advancing knowledge and improving the human condition.&rdquo;</p> <p> Past recipients of the award include Dr. Kandeh Yumkella, former United Nations Under-Secretary-General; Dr. T. Nejat Veziroglu, President, International Hydrogen Energy Association; Nandan Nilekani, former CEO of Infosys; Dr. Ghauth Jasmon, Former Vice Chancellor, University of Malaya, Kualalumpur; Dr. Bernard Amadei, President, Engineers without Borders; and Dr. Anil Kakodkar, Former Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission, amongst others.</p> <p> The award&rsquo;s namesake was born in the Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh, India in 1922. Professor Nayudamma was an internationally renowned organic chemist, practical technologist, and academic leader, as well as the former President of the International Council for Science&rsquo;s Committee on Science and Technology in Developing Countries. He is perhaps best known, however, for dedicating his life to demonstrating how science and technology can and should be used for human benefit.</p> <p> To commemorate Nayudamma, the NCDA has organized the Nayudamma Memorial Lecture and presented the Nayudamma Award annually since 1994.</p> <p> &ldquo;A scientist of international repute, Dr. Krishnan&rsquo;s contributions to the fields of big data, smart cities, living analytics, and information technology are matchless,&rdquo; said Dr. Anumakonda Jagadeesh, Director of the Nayudamma Centre for Development Alternatives. &ldquo;The volume, variety and velocity of data coming into organizations&nbsp;continue to reach unprecedented levels. This phenomenal growth means that one&nbsp;must not only understand big data in order to decipher the information that truly counts, but must also understand the possibilities of big data analytics.&rdquo;</p> <p> A faculty member at CMU since 1988, Krishnan was appointed Dean when the Heinz College was created in 2008. He was reappointed upon the completion of his first term as Dean in 2014.</p> <p> &ldquo;I am honored to receive this award, and I feel privileged to have the opportunity to address my colleagues at a ceremony that celebrates the legacy of Professor Nayudamma, who was an innovative and inspirational leader,&rdquo; said Krishnan. &ldquo;The 20 individuals who have previously received this award have been instrumental in shaping the field of sustainable development for the past two decades, and to join them in this journey is truly humbling.&rdquo;</p> <p> Professor Bhaskar Ramamurthi, Director of IIT-Madras, expressed pride in the fact that this year&#39;s awardee is an alumnus of the Institute.</p> <p> &quot;Our alumni have distinguished themselves in all walks of life, and Professor Krishnan is a shining example in the academic sphere,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Over the recent past, we have evolved close collaborative ties with CMU, and Krishnan has played a key role in that. His work on data analytics, in particular, has great relevance to ongoing research on campus, and we look forward to a sustained relationship on this front.&rdquo; ‚Äč</p> <p> The NCDA ceremony marks Krishnan&rsquo;s second trip to India this year to share his expertise on sustainable development. In July, he attended the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/india-event/" target="_blank">Integrated Intelligence Showcase in New Delhi</a>, the largest gathering of Carnegie Mellon University alumni, parents, and future students outside of the United States. Krishnan <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2783" target="_blank">moderated the Smart Cities Panel</a> at the showcase, which focused on how CMU is creating and leveraging technology to improve the human condition.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=51" target="_blank">Learn more about Ramayya Krishnan &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/download.aspx?id=35" target="_blank">Learn more about the Nayudamma Centre for Development Alternatives as well as the list of past recipients &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2819Mon, 21 Dec 2015 09:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10037photo

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Keeping Arrow Sharp: Sameer Saithttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2817]]><p> Take it from Sameer Sait: IT security is a risky business.</p> <p> &ldquo;New attack vectors are being discovered all the time,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;The pressure to defend our critical infrastructure and data is intense.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fortunately, Sait (MISM &rsquo;04) thrives under the pressure. The information security and risk executive has over 15 years of global leadership experience at Fortune 100 firms, utilizing his skills to improve business processes while minimizing risk in the operating environment.</p> <p> In his current role as Vice President and Chief Information Security Officer at <a href="http://www.arrow.com/" target="_blank">Arrow Electronics</a>, a Fortune 150 company with 2014 sales of $22.8 billion, Sait is responsible for protecting the company&rsquo;s digital assets. To accomplish this, he leads teams devoted to everything from IT governance, risk, and compliance to security operations and incident response). Prior to joining Arrow, Sait performed a similar role as Vice President and Head of Information Security at <a href="http://www.massmutual.com/" target="_blank">MassMutual</a>.</p> <p> Though he had always been interested in technology strategy as a professional field, Sait shifted his career goals in the early 2000s. He became increasingly interested in IT compliance as an emerging field in the wake of several major corporate accounting scandals, including Enron and WorldCom.</p> <p> &ldquo;Technology strategy was very appealing to me,&rdquo; said Sait. &ldquo;But I knew I didn&rsquo;t have the experience that kind of role would require. It made sense for me to consider opportunities that were more aligned to my skill set and background.&rdquo;</p> <p> Having already spent three years as a business analyst in financial services, Sait began seeking a master&rsquo;s program that would further develop his skills in IT strategy and program management.</p> <p> For Sait, the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Information Systems Management (MISM)</a> program at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> was the perfect fit. At the time, Heinz College&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-security-policy-management-msispm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Information Security Policy and Management (MSISPM)</a> program was still under development, and the MISM program offered a specialization in Information Security.</p> <p> The MISM program&rsquo;s unique blend of technology, management and strategy is designed to help students develop better technical, leadership, and planning abilities that focus on the application of technology to create business value. The flagship MISM degree is an accelerated, three-semester, 16-month program that includes significant experiential learning in the form of internships and opportunities with global organizations, which give students a chance to apply IT and business leadership skills to real-world situations.</p> <p> Students like Sait with more than three years of professional work experience can forgo the internship and complete the MISM degree in one calendar year.</p> <p> &ldquo;The one-year accelerated program was a great training ground to prepare me for a leadership role in Information Security,&rdquo; said Sait. &ldquo;The Heinz advantage is a combination of public policy and technology that further allows for specializations that cater to the individual goals of a student. Not many programs can say that.&rdquo;</p> <p> Indeed, <a href="http://www.usnews.com/" target="_blank">U.S. News &amp; World Report</a> ranks <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s</a> Heinz College as the number one graduate school in Information and Technology and Management. Sait says this is due not only to the quality of teaching, but also to the interdisciplinary flexibility that Heinz College offers its students. In addition to the Heinz curriculum, students have the option to take courses at CMU&#39;s highly ranked <a href="http://www.scs.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">School of Computer Science</a> and the <a href="http://tepper.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Tepper School of Business</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;The great thing about the MISM program is the diversity of options available to graduates,&rdquo; said Sait. &ldquo;The MISM prepares graduates for leadership roles in a variety of industries and verticals.&rdquo;</p> <p> Sait himself is exemplary of this diversity. Since completing the program in 2004, he has worked in the financial services, telecommunications, and consumer goods industries, thanks in part to MISM&rsquo;s robust recruiting ecosystem, which provides its graduates with career opportunities in Silicon Valley, New York City, and everywhere in-between.</p> <p> &ldquo;Name recognition of a CMU degree goes a long way,&rdquo; said Sait, who was recruited for his current role at Arrow by the company&rsquo;s Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer, a fellow CMU alum who sits on the executive committee and reports directly to the CEO.</p> <p> Sait&rsquo;s advice for individuals seeking to enter the rapidly-growing field of information security is to focus on developing fundamental knowledge in one domain first.</p> <p> &ldquo;While pursuing the MISM, I realized quickly that technology strategy and program management are functions that every analyst will perform at some level,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;To be in a pure strategy or program management role would require subject matter expertise in an IT discipline. If you can show expertise in one area, that will open up opportunities in other domains.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MISM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-security-policy-management-msispm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MSISPM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2817Mon, 16 Dec 2015 10:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10031photo

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Researchers Find Hospital | Prices Vary for the Privately Insuredhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2818]]><p style="text-align: right;"> <em>This story was originally published on the</em> <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">www.cmu.edu</a> <em>website. It is republished with permission.</em></p> <p> A new &ldquo;Big Data&rdquo; project from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics demonstrates that the prices hospitals negotiate with private health insurance companies vary considerably within and across geographic regions in the United States.</p> <p> The study, released today, provides the most comprehensive and detailed analysis of private health care spending in the U.S. to date and examines the real prices hospitals negotiate with private insurers for medical services. The researchers analyzed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people covered by three of the nation&rsquo;s largest insurance companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealth. The data, provided by the <a href="http://www.healthcostinstitute.org/" target="_blank">Health Care Cost Institute</a>, represents spending and utilization for nearly 30 percent of all individuals in the U.S. with employer-sponsored coverage.</p> <p> The study finds that the disparity of hospital prices within regions is the primary driver of variation in health care spending for the privately insured. For example, hospital prices for lower-limb MRIs are 12 times higher in the most expensive area (Bronx, N.Y.) than in the cheapest area (Baltimore, Md.) and can vary by up to a factor of nine within the same geographic area (Miami, Fla.).</p> <p> While there are many factors influencing hospital prices, the study shows that hospitals that face fewer competitors have substantially higher prices, beyond those that would be driven by cost or quality differences. Hospitals in monopoly markets have prices that are more than 15 percent higher than those in areas with four or more competitors. Hospitals that face only one competitor have prices that are over 6 percent higher, and those that face two competitors have prices almost 5 percent higher.</p> <p> <img alt="Health Care Project Logo" src="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/december/images/hcpp_logo_400x225-min.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 225px; margin: 10px; float: right;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;These price differences between hospitals can be thousands of dollars,&rdquo; said Martin Gaynor, the E.J. Barone Professor of Economics and Health Policy at CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>. &ldquo;For example, the price of an average inpatient stay at a monopoly hospital is almost $1,900 higher than where there are four or more competitors. We know that these higher prices end up getting translated into higher premiums that employers pass on to workers.</p> <p> &ldquo;There have been over 1,200 mergers in the hospital industry since 1994, and 457 since 2010. Our work shows that the consequences of this merger wave can be dire for consumers. There&rsquo;s a real need for continued vigorous antitrust enforcement and other policy options to encourage competition and combat market power,&rdquo; Gaynor said.</p> <p> According to the study, total health care spending for the privately insured varies tremendously across the U.S. Spending was three times greater in the most expensive health market than in the cheapest.</p> <p> Crucially important is that spending patterns for the privately insured don&rsquo;t look like those for Medicare. There is an extremely low correlation (14 percent) between spending on Medicare beneficiaries and spending on the privately insured. For example, in 2011, Grand Junction, Colo., had the third-lowest Medicare spending per beneficiary among the nation&rsquo;s 306 hospital markets, but the ninth highest inpatient prices and the 43rd highest spending per privately insured beneficiary.</p> <p> &ldquo;Virtually everything we know about health spending and most of the basis for federal health policy comes from the analysis of Medicare data,&rdquo; said Zack Cooper, assistant professor of health policy and economics at Yale. &ldquo;The rub is that Medicare only covers 16 percent of the population. The majority of individuals &mdash; 60 percent of the U.S. population &mdash; receive health care coverage from private insurers. This new dataset really allows us to understand what influences health spending for the majority of Americans. This information is critical to creating better public policy.</p> <p> &ldquo;Many of the regions cited by policymakers as models for the nation, like Grand Junction, Colo.; Rochester, Minn.; and La Crosse, Wis., have extremely high spending for the privately insured. Simply put, we cannot use these areas to shape federal policy,&rdquo; Cooper said.</p> <p> Health care is among the largest sectors of the U.S. economy and accounted for more than 17 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP) in 2013.</p> <p> &ldquo;The fact that prices are so high and can vary so much for hospital treatments of the same costs and quality is simply mind boggling to foreign observers of the U.S. health care system. This is surely one of the reasons why U.S. health care absorbs a bigger share of the GDP than every other large advanced country,&rdquo; said John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.</p> <p> The study, &ldquo;The Price Ain&rsquo;t Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured,&rdquo; was authored by Zack Cooper (Yale University), Stuart Craig (University of Pennsylvania), Martin Gaynor (Carnegie Mellon University) and John Van Reenen (London School of Economics).</p> <p> <a href="http://www.healthcarepricingproject.org" target="_blank">Download</a> the paper, an executive summary and slides of the analysis.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2818Mon, 15 Dec 2015 08:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10032photo

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Vamanan Gopalakrishnan to Serve as Social Entrepreneur in Residencehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2811]]><p> Heinz College student Vamanan Gopalakrishnan (MSPPM &lsquo;17) was recently named Social Entrepreneur in Residence at Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s <span style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/institute-for-social-innovation/index.aspx" target="_blank">Institute for Social Innovation (ISI)</a>, a position he will hold for the remainder of the academic year.</p> <p> &ldquo;There are so many issues happening on a global level that I know we could solve if people would come together to find a solution,&rdquo; said Gopalakrishnan. &ldquo;But everyone&rsquo;s so caught up in their own work, that it takes social innovation as a field of study to unite them.&rdquo;</p> <p> This is exactly what the ISI is designed to do. Established in 2006 and housed at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, the ISI is a multi-disciplinary institute providing <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">CMU</a> students, faculty members, and researchers with a variety of applied learning opportunities to design, prototype, and launch financially sustainable ventures, projects, and policy initiatives for social good.&nbsp;</p> <p> One way the ISI does this is by partnering with the <a href="http://www.cmucreatelab.org/" target="_blank">Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment (CREATE) Lab</a>, whose mission is to empower everyday citizens and scientists with affordable environmental sensing and documentation instruments, with a goal of promoting evidence-based decision-making, public discourse, and action.</p> <p> &ldquo;The people working in the CREATE Lab are very technically minded, and are able to come up with some incredible prototypes and products,&rdquo; said Gopalakrishnan. &ldquo;What I bring to table is a macro point of view, which helps me figure out how to integrate these projects into society.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=209" target="_blank">Tim Zak</a>, Heinz College faculty member and Director of the ISI, says that, as a Social Entrepreneur in Residence, Gopalakrishnan will be tasked with discovering innovative ways to tangibly incorporate this technology into the lives of those who can benefit from it.</p> <p> &ldquo;The ideal candidate for the Social Entrepreneurship in Residence program is someone who has recognition and empathy for issues of societal benefit, understands where application of technology would be able to contribute to that, and has enough relevant understanding to give better insight for its application,&rdquo; said Zak.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Vamanan Gopalakrishnan" src="image.aspx?id=10028" style="width: 30%; float: left; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> The ISI is already working with partners in the Pittsburgh community on projects to improve the quality of life for local residents. During his residency, Gopalakrishnan will also be responsible for determining ways to share these innovative programs with an even wider audience, bringing them to cities where they will be most useful.</p> <p> His first target for expansion is Salt Lake City, Utah, which has one of the largest populations of homeless individuals in the nation. After learning from the experiences of launching this pilot program, he plans to turn his focus to Atlanta, Georgia, which also suffers from poverty, homelessness, and crime rates that are above the respective national averages. &nbsp;</p> <p> Gopalakrishnan says his first step will be to gain a thorough understanding of each of the CREATE Lab&rsquo;s projects, in order to consolidate them into a cohesive unit that can be transported to and applied in other places.</p> <p> To do this, Gopalakrishnan will draw on his ongoing experience as a student in the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM)</a> program, which emphasizes multidisciplinary thinking, teamwork and leadership development.</p> <p> Gopalakrishnan says he chose to pursue his graduate studies at Heinz College because of its unique combination of public policy and informatics, as well as its collaborative partnerships with programs like the ISI and the CREATE Lab.</p> <p> &ldquo;Having access to these resources is a luxury that many cities don&rsquo;t have,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s really important to spread the work we do to places that don&rsquo;t have this kind of funding and resources for social innovation.&rdquo;</p> <p> Gopalakrishnan will graduate with his MSPPM degree in May of 2017. Originally, he had planned to move on to law school after completing the MSPPM program, but he says his experience at Heinz College has inspired him to pursue a career in social entrepreneurship and consulting.</p> <p> &ldquo;This field has a whole range of scopes, but the common theme is making the world a better place by tackling problems that our society as a whole is dealing with, like homelessness, crime, hunger, poverty,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> For Gopalakrishnan, the key to finding innovative solutions for these societal challenges is for individuals from a range of disciplines to come together and share ideas for improving communities across the globe.</p> <p> &ldquo;I invite anyone who has an idea for how to do this, to come to me and share their ideas,&rdquo; said Gopalakrishnan. &ldquo;There are so many talented people working at Heinz and at CMU, and we want to benefit from their strengths.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MSPPM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/institute-for-social-innovation/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the Institute for Social Innovation &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2811Mon, 02 Dec 2015 11:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=10026photo

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Heinz Students Learn About Smart(er) Incentives for Business Attractionhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2810]]><p> This fall Dr. Ellen Harpel visited Heinz College to give a talk entitled &quot;Business Location Incentives for Economic Development&quot;.&nbsp; Dr. Harpel is the founder of <a href="http://www.smartincentives.org/pages/leadership" target="_blank">Smart Incentives</a> and president of <a href="http://www.businessdevelopmentadvisors.com/" target="_blank">Business Development Advisors</a> LLC (BDA), an economic development and market intelligence consulting firm.<br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Dr. Harpel started the presentation by introducing the concept of business location incentives, and the many forms incentives can take, such as grants, loans, free land, and tax credits, deductions, abatements, and deferrals to corporate employers.&nbsp; The reality of accelerating competition between state and local governments for employers was discussed, as were the difficulties for local communities in determining whether specific incentives were likely to be decisive for employers or beneficial for taxpayers.<br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The floor was then opened to students, resulting in discussions on film tax credits, and&nbsp; recent cases such as Airbus in Mobile AL, Tesla in Nevada, and the possible Shell Ethane Cracker Plant in Beaver County PA.&nbsp; The question of designing incentives for small to medium businesses vs. multi-national firms was also discussed.&nbsp; The talk then moved on to how communities can use incentives more effectively, including linking them to meaningful, regionally relevant economic and community development goals, and evaluating deals for risks, costs, benefits, and strategic fit.&nbsp; Dr. Harpel concluded the presentation with a brief overview of the Smart Incentives framework.<br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Business Development Advisors LLC (<a href="http://www.businessdevelopmentadvisors.com/" target="_blank">http://www.businessdevelopmentadvisors.com/</a>) is a consulting firm engaged in helping communities design smart incentive packages to attract employers to their communities.&nbsp; Ellen is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness, and an affiliate of the Center for Regional Analysis at George Mason University.&nbsp;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2810Mon, 23 Nov 2015 15:31:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=0photo

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