Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College Energetic Leader Joseph Hezirhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2789]]><p> <em>This article originally appeared on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/july/energetic-leader.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> As chief financial officer for the U.S. Department of Energy, Joseph Hezir (E 1972, HNZ 1974) oversees a complex $29 billion budget.</p> <p> He credits his Carnegie Mellon University degrees in chemical engineering and public policy as helping him become the leader he is today.</p> <p> &quot;In the course of my career, I&#39;ve had the opportunity to work with many people coming out of other institutions. The quality of the education I received at Carnegie Mellon was unmatched from anyone else I&#39;ve ever worked with,&quot; Hezir said. &quot;I probably couldn&#39;t do what I do without the benefit of both degrees.&quot;</p> <p> Hezir was confirmed to his post by the Senate on Dec. 4, 2014.</p> <p> &quot;Joe&#39;s experience in the energy, environmental and budgetary realms and his strategic approach to challenges make him a great fit as chief financial officer for the agency,&quot; said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz when the appointment was announced.</p> <p> Hezir is working to assure the effective management and financial integrity of the department. He helps implement and monitor department-wide policies and systems in the areas of budget administration, program analysis and evaluation, finance and accounting, internal controls, corporate financial systems, and strategic planning.</p> <p> In addition to Hezir, another member of the 1974 Heinz program is also with the department. Cynthia Wilson (DC 1973, HNZ 1974), a senior policy advisor, has known Hezir for more than 40 years. The 18 students who graduated together continue to stay in touch.</p> <p> &quot;The group deeply bonded together over our two-year program,&quot; Wilson said. The most recent gathering was last November in Pittsburgh. &quot;Joe was always the quietest of all of us and the deepest thinker.&quot;</p> <p> Prior to joining the department, Hezir worked as a research engineer and executive director of The Future of Solar Energy Study and a member of the Future of Natural Gas study team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology&#39;s Energy Initiative.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Joseph Hezir" src="image.aspx?id=9875" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />He was the vice president and managing partner of EOP Group, Inc. and executive vice president of EOP Education, LLC and EOP Foundation, Inc. Hezir also held various roles at the Office of Management and Budget, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, the President&#39;s Reorganization Project, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and was an adviser to a number of public policy and public service organizations.</p> <p> Hezir credits Ed Rubin, the&nbsp;Alumni Chair Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science&nbsp;and a&nbsp;professor of Engineering and Public Policy, Mechanical Engineering&nbsp;for being instrumental in steering him to a career of public service.</p> <p> &quot;Joe attended CMU during my early years on the faculty, but I still remember him as a serious and bright student, interested not only in the technical dimensions of engineering, but in societal and policy aspects as well,&quot; Rubin said.</p> <p> When Rubin was working on a National Academies&#39; energy study, he learned that Hezir was the highly respected overseer of the Department of Energy&#39;s budget line at the federal Office of Management &amp; Budget.</p> <p> &quot;That re-established our connection. He later moved to a D.C. consulting firm, where I called on him for advice in formulating a legislative proposal related to climate change,&quot; Rubin said. &quot;His new position at DOE puts him at the top of his game. I can&#39;t imagine anyone better qualified.&quot;</p> <p> Hezir said the analytical underpinning of CMU&#39;s education is important in pursuing a career in policy.</p> <p> &quot;Policy is often equated to politics, but policy is an increasingly complex field and analytical insights are a critical skill in addressing those issues,&quot; Hezir said.</p> <p> Wilson said that her friends and former classmates have taken those analytical tools they learned in school and transferred them to fields such as health care, finance and real estate. &quot;The strength of Heinz is that we were taught skills not topics,&quot; she said.</p> <p> Rubin echoed that sentiment.</p> <p> &quot;Many of our most pressing and challenging public policy issues are deeply rooted in technology &mdash; think about energy systems, telecommunications or climate change,&quot; he said. &quot;At CMU, we&#39;ve succeeded as no other university has in training students who can work effectively at the interface between technology and policy. Joe does us proud.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2789Mon, 23 Jul 2015 08:55:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9871photo

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Heinz Faculty Members Honoredhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2788]]><p> With the widespread global proliferation of Internet use and the rapid development of mobile technology over the last two decades, companies like Google, Adobe, and LinkedIn have consistently committed to developing new technologies to help users find and utilize information that will more closely connect individuals and have a positive impact on society as a whole.</p> <p> This commitment has led to a desire on the part of these organizations to maintain strong ties with academic institutions worldwide that pursue innovative research in core areas relevant to their mission of the pursuit of information.</p> <p> So it&rsquo;s no surprise that all three of these companies recently chose to support research that is currently being conducted by <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=104" target="_blank">Rahul Telang</a> and <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=476" target="_blank">Beibei Li</a>, faculty members at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s</a> H. John Heinz III College.</p> <p> Telang, professor of Information Systems and Ph.D. Program Chair at Heinz College, and <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/directories/doctoral-students/doctoral-student-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=564" target="_blank">Abhinav Maurya</a>, a Heinz College Ph.D. student in Information Systems, are developing ways in which individuals in the workforce can harness data available on LinkedIn to acquire additional skills that are complementary to their current skill sets and obtain upward mobility in their careers.</p> <p> This caught the eye of the social media giant, which recently named Maurya and Telang&rsquo;s proposal <em>Your Next Big Move: Personalized Data-Driven Career-Making</em> one of 11 winners of the 2015 <a href="http://economicgraphchallenge.linkedin.com/" target="_blank">LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge</a>.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="LinkedIn Presentation" src="image.aspx?id=9869" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />LinkedIn launched the Economic Graph Challenge to encourage researchers, academics, and data-driven thinkers to propose how they would use data from LinkedIn to generate insights that may ultimately lead to new economic opportunities.</p> <p> Maurya and Telang&rsquo;s proposal focuses on utilizing <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/linkedin-economic-graph?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1396903016899%2Ctas%3Aeconomic+graph%2Cidx%3A1-1-1" target="_blank">Economic Graph</a> data to help individuals make good decisions in acquiring additional skills based on their previous expertise and current skill gaps.</p> <p> &ldquo;LinkedIn has a treasure trove of big data on labor economics &ndash; what skills people possess, what schools they have attended, and what positions they have held, and what jobs are currently available,&rdquo; said Maurya. &ldquo;The missing link is that in order for people to become eligible for better jobs, sometimes they need to acquire additional skills they may be lacking. A recent survey from <a href="http://www.manpowergroup.com/wps/wcm/connect/manpowergroup-en/home/#.Vae5MhNVhBc" target="_blank">ManpowerGroup</a> found that 40 percent of people in the workforce lack skills for the jobs they aspire to.</p> <p> &ldquo;Many employees in the workforce are dissatisfied with their jobs despite being good at what they do, due to a lack of engaging challenges in their day-to-day work. If we can identify skills that would make them desirable for more challenging careers in a data-driven yet explanatory fashion, it could help millions of people lead more productive professional careers. So our proposal basically addressed that: how do we recommend a new skill to be acquired by a person so that he becomes eligible for a more satisfying and more challenging job?&rdquo;</p> <p> One of the elements that sets the <em>Your Next Big Move</em> proposal apart from others in the Economic Graph Challenge that also deal with the skills gap is that it applies an economic perspective to an economic problem.</p> <p> &ldquo;In our proposal, we are saying that if a person has certain skills, it might be more cost-effective for him to acquire a particular skill &lsquo;x&rsquo; rather than some other random skill,&rdquo; explained Maurya. &ldquo;So the utility of acquiring a new skill largely depends on the context of a person&rsquo;s background in terms of skills and education, and the demand for that new skill in the labor market.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;The project can be thought of as bridging the information gap,&rdquo; added Telang. &ldquo;We are all trying to maximize our outcomes, but sometimes we just don&rsquo;t have enough information, and acquiring it can be very costly for us. LinkedIn has all of this information, so our project on a very simple level is to harness that information and give it to the user so that they can make a better decision.&rdquo;</p> <p> In addition to receiving a $25,000 research grant from LinkedIn, Maurya and Telang will have the opportunity to work with valuable professional data under the supervision and guidance of a LinkedIn employee mentor, before presenting their findings to LinkedIn executives in December. Telang says that he hopes the project will open doors for future collaborations with LinkedIn.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Beibei Li portrait" src="image.aspx?id=9868" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: right;" /></p> <p> While Maurya and Telang are developing ways that individuals in the workforce can harness the big data available on LinkedIn to obtain additional skills, Beibei Li&rsquo;s research focuses on how businesses can best utilize mobile advertising.</p> <p> Li, assistant professor of Information Systems and Management at Heinz College, was named a recipient of both the Google Research Award and the Adobe Digital Marketing Research Award for her research project <em>C</em><em>ombining Machine Learning with Randomized Field Experiments to Improve Mobile Advertising</em>.</p> <p> Each year, Google presents the <a href="http://research.google.com/university/relations/research_awards.html" target="_blank">Google Research Award</a> with the goal of supporting cutting-edge research in computer science, engineering, and related fields like mobile technologies, information retrieval, and human-computer interaction.</p> <p> Adobe funds its annual <a href="http://www.adobe.com/careers/college.html" target="_blank">Digital Marketing Research Award program</a> to promote the understanding and use of data science in the area of marketing, with the goal of encouraging both theoretical and empirical development of solutions to problems in marketing.</p> <p> Li&rsquo;s research on smartphone usage and social media made her the ideal recipient of both awards.</p> <p> &ldquo;Smartphone usage is expected to exceed 2.03 billion users worldwide by the end of 2015,&rdquo; said Li. &ldquo;The proliferation of mobile technologies has contributed to the rise of mobile location-based advertising, which led to my proposal, which is closely in line with the strong interests of both Google and Adobe in this space.&rdquo;</p> <p> Li&rsquo;s proposal looks to combine individual users&rsquo; online social media and social network information together with their offline mobility trajectory information to better understand individual behavior and preferences. This large-scale and fine-grained data from mobile and sensor technologies can help platforms like Google and Adobe to design better mobile recommendation strategies to improve the overall user digital experiences and business marketing strategies.</p> <p> &ldquo;The proliferation of mobile technologies makes it possible for mobile advertisers to leap beyond the real-time snapshot of the static location and context information about consumers,&rdquo; said Li. &ldquo;In our research, we propose a new mobile recommendation strategy that is able to link user social and individual behavioral trajectories via both online and offline channels. It not only extracts user preferences from a large variety of online social networks, but also leverages full information on users&rsquo; physical trajectories.</p> <p> &ldquo;Furthermore, consumers have demonstrated increasing responsiveness to mobile advertising. But without accurate measurement, it&rsquo;s difficult&nbsp;for marketers to shift significant budget to follow them.&rdquo;</p> <p> Li explains that, as mobile marketing goes mainstream, it is extremely critical for offline retailers to effectively measure the impact of their campaigns. To examine the effectiveness of her new mobile social-trajectory-based advertising strategy, Li plans to conduct a large-scale randomized field experiment in a large shopping mall.</p> <p> &ldquo;We have already successfully set up our collaboration with one of the largest retailers in the world and started preliminary pilot studies in summer 2014,&rdquo; said Li. &ldquo;Our social-trajectory-based mobile recommendation will allow businesses today to leverage both online and offline, and both social and individual granular information about every facet of the customers to infer their preferences.</p> <p> &ldquo;Moreover, our results from the large-scale randomized field experiments will allow us to effectively measure the causal impact of mobile campaigns for businesses. Our study has potential to improve customer analytics for mobile applications and wearable devices, such as Google Glass.</p> <p> &ldquo;It can also provide insights on quantifying and improving the impacts of Google and Adobe on mobile advertising.&rdquo;</p> <p> Telang says that the interdisciplinary nature of both projects, which combine an economic framework with machine learning research, exemplifies the type of collaborative learning that routinely takes place at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;I think these are perfect examples of the kind of interdisciplinary research we tackle at our school, which is combining technology with socioeconomic policy to make society and individuals better,&rdquo; said Telang. &ldquo;If you don&rsquo;t have the technical skills, you can&rsquo;t attack these problems at scale. If you don&rsquo;t have a good socioeconomic framework, you might not be able to think through and frame the problems in the way that we are trying to frame them.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/doctoral-program/phd-ism/index.aspx" target="_blank">More information about the Ph.D. program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://economicgraphchallenge.linkedin.com/" target="_blank">More information about the LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge &gt;&gt;</a><br /> <br /> <a href="http://research.google.com/university/relations/research_awards.html" target="_blank">More information about the Google Research Award &gt;&gt;</a><br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.adobe.com/careers/college.html" target="_blank">More information about the Adobe Digital Marketing Research Award &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2788Mon, 16 Jul 2015 09:39:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9867photo

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MSIT Students Gather at CMU for Leadership Training Eventshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2787]]><p> At Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, leadership training and experiential learning opportunities are core practical components of all academic programs. Heinz students learn behavioral and problem-solving skills that enable them to succeed as leaders who make positive changes and influence individuals around them to achieve goals.</p> <p> But for <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-technology-msit/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT)</a> students, who enjoy the flexibility of earning a CMU degree on a part-time basis through evening and online classes while simultaneously advancing in their full-time careers, finding the time to interact with their fellow students and participate in valuable leadership practicums can be a challenge.</p> <p> &ldquo;Leadership training is an important element of the MSIT program, which strives to prepare our students to take the next step in their careers, often at the organizations and businesses where they currently work,&rdquo; explained Allison Frankoski, MSIT Program Director. &ldquo;As Heinz and CMU students, we also want them to feel connected to campus no matter where they live, work and study.&rdquo;</p> <p> To help strengthen that connection, the MSIT program recently offered a series of practical learning seminars on the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> campus for its part-time students and alumni. These gatherings gave participants a sense of daily campus life at CMU, as well as important opportunities to improve their leadership and networking skills.</p> <p> In March, several MSIT distance students traveled from Mexico, Arizona, California, Florida, and New Jersey to join Pittsburgh campus students in an International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise (ISCNE), hosted by Heinz College and the U.S. Army War College&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.csl.army.mil/" target="_blank">Center for Strategic Leadership and Development</a>.</p> <p> For the exercise, students split into teams representing different countries currently involved in a real-world conflict over claims within the South China Sea. The visiting instructors from the U.S. Army War College taught the students the different protocols and communication systems involved in contemporary international crisis negotiations. The students were then tasked with applying these protocols in a mock negotiation setting, staying true to the cultural perspectives of their respective countries and defending their positions, but ultimately making efforts to bring about a peaceful settlement.</p> <p> This two-day experiential learning simulation not only increased their understanding of international conflicts and negotiation processes, but also improved their effectiveness as a team leaders, team members, and negotiators.</p> <p> &ldquo;I enjoyed it, and what I learned is the&nbsp;difficulty&nbsp;of having multi-day, multi-session, multi-party negotiations,&rdquo; said Mauricio Juanes Laviada, a current MSIT student. &ldquo;Information gets fragmented, and it takes a long time before you can get the complete picture.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;It was also good to get practice on negotiations within the group, when we all got&nbsp;together&nbsp;to discuss what to do next. That is more likely to happen in a work day, and it&rsquo;s&nbsp;useful&nbsp;to have practice and be ready for when it&rsquo;s needed.&rdquo;</p> <p> Last month, nearly 30 MSIT students and alumni met on Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s campus for the 2015 Summer Leadership Symposium, a component of Heinz College&rsquo;s Leadership Training Initiative.</p> <p> &ldquo;We host the annual summer leadership symposium specifically for MSIT students and alumni to meet up in Pittsburgh,&rdquo; said Frankoski. &ldquo;They get to learn from the expert faculty and industry leaders located here, develop their professional network, and strengthen the CMU community beyond our campus borders.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I am starting my own company, so the symposium was really helpful,&rdquo; said Juanes Laviada, who also attended this event. &ldquo;Part of my&nbsp;business&nbsp;plan will be providing IT and software development services to&nbsp;Bepensa&nbsp;and&nbsp;similar&nbsp;companies.&nbsp; Being able to negotiate the&nbsp;right&nbsp;terms will be key to the&nbsp;success&nbsp;of the company.&rdquo;</p> <p> Frankoski says that the practical learning seminars help create a sense of community among students and alumni within the MSIT program, many of whom did their studies through distance learning, and she looks forward to meeting more of them at CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/ceilidh/" target="_blank">C&egrave;ilidh Weekend</a> in October.</p> <p> &ldquo;Providing special events like the ISCNE and Leadership Symposium, as well as some travel subsidy to get here, gives MSIT distance students a chance to enjoy some of the opportunities and resources that are available to campus students every day,&rdquo; said Frankoski.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-technology-msit/index.aspx" target="_blank">Read more about the MSIT program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2787Mon, 10 Jul 2015 14:15:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9863photo

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Dean Ramayya Krishnan Moderates CMU Integrated Intelligence Showcase on Smart Citieshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2783]]><p> Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, moderated the Smart Cities Panel at Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/integrated-intelligence/" target="_blank">Integrated Intelligence</a> Showcase on July 4 at the Taj Palace in New Delhi, India.</p> <p> The showcase, which featured <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> President Subra Suresh, focused on how CMU is creating and leveraging technology to improve the human condition. The daylong event for alumni, parents, students, and friends of the university included networking opportunities and panel discussions on &ldquo;Smart Cities&rdquo; and the &ldquo;Transformative Impact of Big Data.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Since its founding in 1968, Heinz College has been at the forefront of working closely with cities to implement innovative integrated intelligence solutions with the goal of helping civic systems work more efficiently,&rdquo; said Dean Krishnan. &ldquo;The symposium was a wonderful opportunity to showcase all that Carnegie Mellon and the Heinz College are doing in partnership with cities to create and implement cutting-edge solutions to public policy challenges, ultimately improving the lives of individuals living in metro centers in the process.&rdquo;</p> <p> <em><a href="http://www.ices.cmu.edu/metro21/" target="_blank">Metro21</a> </em>is a university-wide, multi-disciplinary research and educational initiative, incubated in the Heinz College and the College of Engineering, with the goal of designing, developing, deploying, and evaluating solutions to the challenges affecting the economy and quality of life in metro areas. In less than a year, researchers supported by <em>Metro21</em> have worked with Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s &ldquo;home metro&rdquo; of Pittsburgh on projects ranging from the implementation of a smartphone-based road inspection system to help repair potholes, to developing predictive analytics software to help city officials respond proactively and effectively to &ldquo;311&rdquo; non-emergency request calls.</p> <p> &ldquo;Krishnan&rsquo;s role has really been as an instigator and as a leader working with other deans to design and launch <em>Metro21</em>,&rdquo; said Rick Stafford, <em>Metro21</em> Director and Distinguished Service Professor of Public Policy at Heinz College. &ldquo;Right from the beginning, he was firm in his belief that an interdisciplinary approach is required to solve complex societal problems. Without his visionary leadership and hands-on approach to the research and implementation of these systems, <em>Metro21</em> would not exist as it does today.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Smart Cities Panel" src="image.aspx?id=9860" style="width: 301.796875px; margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p> In addition to Dean Krishnan&rsquo;s involvement as moderator, Sumit D. Chowdhury (MS CIT &rsquo;97, Ph.D. HNZ &rsquo;98), a Heinz College alumnus and founder of <a href="http://gaiasmartcities.com/" target="_blank">Gaia Smart Cities</a>, served as a panelist during the &ldquo;Smart Cities&rdquo; panel discussion at the showcase.</p> <p> Gaia Smart Cities is a pioneering company that deploys products and solutions to create interconnected and intelligent cities. Chowdhury shared his expertise in the field of integrated intelligence with current Carnegie Mellon students this summer when he taught &ldquo;Smart City,&rdquo; a new Heinz College course.</p> <p> The <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=597" target="_blank">&ldquo;Smart City&rdquo;</a> course aims to give an overview of the concepts and practices in the development, feasibility, and sustainability of Smart Cities. The course focuses on stages of Smart City development and the design of New Urban Systems for mobility, energy, food, living, and working. Through the course, students explore how the design of these systems can be resilient, scalable, and reconfigurable.</p> <p> &ldquo;The focus of the course is on the technology and information infrastructure requirements for smart cities, and on ways to measure success in these areas,&rdquo; said Chowdhury. &ldquo;We want students to have the opportunity to develop frameworks to identify problems fit for Smart City consideration in view of the local socio-economic challenges, including the funding of such cross-functional projects.&rdquo;&rsquo;</p> <p> As Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India, has made Smart Cities a priority for his administration, Dean Krishnan says the CMU Integrated Intelligence Showcase provided a great networking and professional development opportunity for the more than 1,800 Carnegie Mellon alumni who currently live and work in India.</p> <p> &ldquo;It is important for our alumni in India and around the world to recognize the important role that Smart City research and implementation will play in urban socio-economic development in the coming years and decades,&rdquo; said Dean Krishnan. &ldquo;My hope is that Heinz College faculty and alumni will continue to innovate the field of integrated intelligence and provide leadership in improving the efficiency and livability of cities across the globe for their inhabitants.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.ices.cmu.edu/metro21/" target="_blank">Learn more about Metro 21 &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2783Mon, 09 Jul 2015 10:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9859photo

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Heinz College Students Sharehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2786]]><p> As the technology surrounding the creation and acquisition of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) increasingly becomes more affordable, developers from a wide variety of global industries are consistently formulating creative ways to utilize UAVs to increase efficiency and productivity. From filmmaking, to search and rescue efforts, to scientific research, UAVs have literally changed the way that humans look at the world, enabling users to probe parts of the globe in areas and under conditions that would otherwise prove too dangerous for manned flight.</p> <p> With this in mind, a group of enterprising students in H. John Heinz III College&rsquo;s Master of Information Systems Management - Global Track (<a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/21-month-track/index.aspx" target="_blank">Global MISM)</a> program, which gives students an opportunity to study at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s campus in Adelaide, South Australia in their first year before completing their second year of study at the Pittsburgh campus, developed and pitched a UAV-based system they hope will aid in the cultivation of one of the world&rsquo;s most popular beverages.</p> <p> &ldquo;The agriculture industry is one of the few civilian industries that can really capitalize on the benefits of having autonomous systems,&rdquo; explained James Laney (MISM &lsquo;16). &ldquo;So we did some more research about what&rsquo;s the best crop, and being in Australia, especially South Australia, it&rsquo;s the home of the wine country. It&rsquo;s kind of like the Napa Valley of Australia. And because it&rsquo;s a cash crop and involves very intimate growing practices, we thought it would be the first one that we should target as a customer and as a way to develop our services for agricultural autonomous systems.&rdquo;</p> <p> Immersed in Adelaide&rsquo;s blossoming startup community, Laney and fellow students Constantin Baumgartner and Daniel Del Duca became interested in UAVs in part because of Australian laws that allow for autonomous research.</p> <p> &ldquo;In Australia, the UAV laws allow you to operate a UAV as a service, which is something that you currently can&rsquo;t do in the States,&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;So we tried to come up with any and every excuse to build a business model around UAVs.&rdquo;</p> <p> Through their research group, <a href="http://aerolaboratories.com/" target="_blank">Aero Laboratories</a>, Laney, Baumgartner, and Del Duca utilized big data and input from local Australian viticulturists and growers to create the cloud-based Vegetation Analysis and Data Regression (VADAR) engine. Aggregating farming data that is already regularly collected, such as rainfall, soil moisture, and Global Solar Radiation, VADAR develops mathematical relationships between infield variables and overall crop health. The engine also isolates crop stress and displays the information via a report in an easy-to-use, interactive mobile platform.</p> <p> VADAR&rsquo;s digital platform displaying real-time crop analysis helps growers develop precision management strategies that reduce input costs by saving them time and money.</p> <p> &ldquo;With current technology, a term that gets thrown around is &lsquo;precision agriculture,&rsquo;&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s the ability to take your large farm, segregate it and isolate different areas, and then target the specific areas that may be lagging or experiencing crops stress. Then you can try to fix just those areas versus applying a general treatment to the whole area. So by selecting each part, you&rsquo;re able to reduce input costs like fertilizer and water. Water is very scarce in Australia; it&rsquo;s very dry, so being able to control that better saves farmers a lot of money.&rdquo;</p> <p> The Aero team had its first opportunity to pitch the VADAR product to investors via <a href="http://thebigpitch.com.au/" target="_blank">The Big Pitch</a> competition. Through the competition, investment group <a href="http://www.oxygenventures.com.au/" target="_blank">Oxygen Ventures</a> travels to six major cities in Australia to listen to selected applicants pitch their idea in hopes of securing a seat at The Big Pitch in Melbourne for a potential share of $5 million. Aero Laboratories was one of only 11 startups in Adelaide that were selected to pitch to Oxygen as part of the competition.</p> <p> &ldquo;After interviewing with the people at The Big Pitch we asked them, &lsquo;why did you select us?&rsquo;&rdquo; recalled Laney. &ldquo;And they said, &lsquo;most of our stuff is your run-of-the-mill-type software businesses. And you guys are completely left-field.&rsquo; This is a big area that we&rsquo;re just touching the surface of &ndash; it&rsquo;s just the beginning of it.</p> <p> &ldquo;We pitched it to them and had a nice conversation. It&rsquo;s been a great experience and helped us answer questions that we wouldn&rsquo;t otherwise have been able to answer from a business perspective.&rdquo;</p> <p> Laney says that the financial analysis and management courses he has taken at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a> have played a major role in Aero&rsquo;s ability to establish VADAR as a viable business enterprise.</p> <p> &ldquo;A lot of what we&rsquo;ve been doing is taking the concepts that we use to do business analytics, those same types of regression models, and applying them elsewhere,&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve developed a huge costing structure that allowed us to figure out if this a viable business, can we actually operate, what do we need to do this, and that has been extremely helpful. And I&rsquo;m excited to be back at the CMU Pittsburgh campus to take a lot of the elective classes, like machine learning and data analytics, to help refine and develop the product that we&rsquo;re trying to create.&rdquo;</p> <p> Laney is happy with the relationships he&rsquo;s been able to cultivate as a Global MISM student, and he looks forward to working with growers in Pittsburgh and his hometown of Atlanta in continuing to develop the VADAR systems to customize it to the needs of viticulturists in different parts of the world.</p> <p> &ldquo;CMU Australia has a great relationship with the government over there, so we actually informally met with the chief scientist of Australia, told her what we wanted to do, and received feedback from her, which was great,&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;Colin Underwood, the director over there, has been great at setting up connections, and they gave us a space to kind of keep our toys there. So the relationships that CMU has access to and are currently developing have been a key part of our success, and they&rsquo;ve been extremely supportive of what we&rsquo;re doing.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Global MISM students have excelled throughout the program&rsquo;s history at utilizing their creativity and intelligence to cultivate successful entrepreneurial ideas during their time at CMU,&rdquo; said Emil Bolongaita, Executive Director of <a href="http://www.australia.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University Australia</a>. &ldquo;In that spirit, the VADAR team has developed a remarkable engine that can help improve growing practices throughout the world, and has received the attention of national and international investors. I&rsquo;m proud of the work they&rsquo;ve done, and look forward seeing them continue to refine the project as they carry on with their studies at Carnegie Mellon.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/21-month-track/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the Global MISM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2786Mon, 06 Jul 2015 14:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9851photo

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Heinz Project Extendshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2782]]><p> <span class="attribution" style="float:right"><em>This article includes embedded video.</em></span></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> As a legendary baseball club, the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise has five World Series titles and nine National League pennants to its name. But when it came time for the Pirates to find new ways to leverage their social media interactions with their fans, they turned to Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College for innovative solutions.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got almost a million Facebook followers and half-a-million Twitter followers,&rdquo; said Jim Alexander, the Pirates&rsquo; Senior Director of Business Analytics. &ldquo;The challenge is that we&rsquo;re trying to measure the impact that we&rsquo;re having.</p> <p> &ldquo;We thought this was the perfect time for us to use the brainpower that CMU brings.&rdquo;</p> <p> That brainpower came in the form of Heinz College&rsquo;s Measuring Social class, which is an experiential learning opportunity that examines the impact of social media and content. Since interdisciplinary collaboration is one of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s strengths, the class is open to students from all over campus, which leads to a unique blending of knowledge and experience.</p> <p> &ldquo;We have folks who have expertise in security policy and management, public policy and management, information systems and management, as well as business students,&rdquo; said Ari Lightman, Distinguished Service Professor of Digital Media and Marketing at Heinz College, and Measuring Social course instructor. &ldquo;So they all bring a different skill set and a different thought process.</p> <p> &ldquo;Different skill sets are great because you really see a rise in terms of innovation.&rdquo;</p> <p> The project involved finding new ways for the Pirates to better serve the fans with whom they engage on social media. The Measuring Social team developed an algorithm that would help the Pirates organization better determine which variables will lead to more engagement on social media platforms. Increased engagement on social media leads to a direct increase in fan loyalty and revenue.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Heinz Pirates Capstone Team" src="image.aspx?id=8811" style="margin: 10px; float: left; width: 40%;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;We got a better understanding from the fans themselves of what they wanted from the Pirates social media,&rdquo; said Therese M. Joseph, a&nbsp;Master of Arts in Professional Writing student. &ldquo;Being able to have that kind of specific data and share that with the Pirates is invaluable.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I think any time you work in a real-world setting, it prepares you for the future,&rdquo; said Marco Loffreda-Mancinelli, a Master of Science in Information Security Policy and Management student at Heinz. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s what I think is the best part of these kinds of projects.</p> <p> &ldquo;You get to work with people and they see you as peers, not as students.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team credits both the skills they learned and the reputation that comes with the Carnegie Mellon name as key factors in the project&rsquo;s success.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a very data-heavy school,&rdquo; said William St. Martin, a Master of Business Administration student. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going through surveys from thousands of respondents, and the ability to sift through data and then generate insights from it may not have been possible if not for the skills I learned at Carnegie Mellon.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s a wonderful partnership, and they bring credibility to the table immediately,&rdquo; added Alexander. &ldquo;They&rsquo;re great people and great teams to work with.</p> <p> &ldquo;Hopefully we can do it for many years to come.&rdquo;</p> <div class="flash"> <p> <iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SffYlWbwlOY?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" width="560"></iframe></p> </div> <p> <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/creativity/2014/summer/take-me-out-to-a-ballgame.shtml" target="_blank">Related Story: Take Me Out To a Ballgame &gt;&gt;</a><br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=410" target="_blank">Learn more about Measuring Social &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2782Mon, 10 Jun 2015 13:47:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=8807photo

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Ostrato and Carnegie Mellon University Team to Advance Cloud Management Technologyhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2785]]><p> STERLING, VA &ndash; Ostrato today announced that it collaborated with a team of students in the Master of Information Systems Management (MISM) program at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Heinz College this spring to enhance cloudSM&rsquo;s billing and reporting capabilities.</p> <p> The explosion of cloud usage has become a cost and management nightmare for thousands of businesses that lack the manpower or expertise to control their cloud costs and usage (or &ldquo;sprawl&rdquo;). This problem is exacerbated by the complexity of billing reports from cloud service providers like Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure, which makes it difficult for companies to track and allocate their spending, let alone manage it.</p> <p> For its capstone project, the Carnegie Mellon team analyzed the bill extraction process for AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine; performed a competitive analysis; and identified and customized billing reports for different classes of cloudSM users, as well as different customer types.</p> <p> &quot;We enlisted the help of our CMU capstone team to help augment our product management,&rdquo; said Dale Wickizer, Ostrato CTO. &ldquo;They were able to combine their own experience in analytics, along with information they gleaned from competitive analysis and research about cloud service provider capabilities/limitations in billing, to synthesize user stories that are going to greatly enhance the cost reporting in our platform.&rdquo;</p> <p> Customers reviewed the user stories that the team completed, and they were pleased with the results. The capstone team then incorporated those stories into the platform, which is currently supporting real-time customer challenges by providing better visibility and control of cost, usage, and billing data.</p> <p> The project team consisted of Amrit Tandon, who served as the scrum master and project manager, Rachita Issar, who led the documentation effort, Chandrasekhar Iyer, the AWS lead, and Sri Keerthi Mady, the Azure team lead.</p> <p> The MISM program focuses on providing students with an integrated study of how technology interacts with business processes, strategy, and policy. As part of this program, students learn from seasoned practitioners, like those at Ostrato, to prepare them to lead enterprises in a fiercely competitive global marketplace. Thus, the team chose to use a real-world agile development process for the project, working in two-week sprints with a daily scrum.</p> <p> Ostrato thanks Jon Nehlsen and the H. John Heinz III College at Carnegie Mellon University, faculty sponsor John Davis, and this great team of students for a job well-done.</p> <p> In addition to cost visibility and management, cloudSM helps enterprises with all facets of controlling the cloud: self-service orchestration across public and private cloud providers, user governance, and enterprise integration to improve workflow and automation.</p> <p> <strong>About Ostrato</strong></p> <p> Ostrato&rsquo;s cloudSM<sup>TM</sup> platform helps companies save time and money managing their complex and fast-growing applications and services in the cloud. cloudSM provides enterprises the visibility and control they need to&nbsp;optimize&nbsp;spend, reduce costs and govern user access across AWS, Azure, VMware, OpenStack and other providers. We do this by providing IT and DevOps with an integrated, self-service platform for provisioning and automating all public, private and hybrid cloud services.&nbsp;In addition, managed service providers (MSPs) can use cloudSM to create new revenue streams, differentiate their offerings and drive down internal costs to meet their customers&rsquo; growing demand for cloud consumption.</p> <p> For more information, visit <a href="http://www.ostrato.com/?utm_expid=75457977-4.3uev_acPTvukHTmJMq6lpw.0" target="_blank">www.ostrato.com</a>.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2785Mon, 09 Jun 2015 13:35:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9819photo

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Heinz Students Develop Solutions to Help Combat Hungerhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2784]]><p> For many kids living with hunger as a part of their daily lives, food served at school is their only reliable source of nutrition. In Allegheny County alone, more than 73,000 kids receive free and reduced price breakfast and lunch meals through the School Breakfast Program (SBP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). In fact, 94 percent of households with children in kindergarten through 12<sup>th</sup> grade report participating in the NSLP. But from June through September, students can no longer depend on those school meals while they are on summer vacation.</p> <p> To combat this, the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank administers a program to reach hungry schoolchildren during the summer months as part of the federally funded Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). In the summer of 2012, the food bank served a total of 622,071 meals and snacks. Despite these numbers, participation rates have waned in recent years, as it is difficult for many families to reach the food distribution centers.</p> <p> To address this problem, the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank called on the expertise of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College to introduce a new data-driven approach to getting food to the children that need it.</p> <p> As part of a student capstone project, Master of Information System Management (MISM) students Eun Ji Noh, Ethel Dubrovsky, Weiwei Liu, Jae Young Park, and Tianyu Yang faced the challenge of raising child participation in the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank&rsquo;s summer food program from 14 percent to the food bank&rsquo;s target participation rate of 40 percent.</p> <p> One of the capstone team&rsquo;s initial problems was finding accurate data from which to draw important information for making future recommendations to the food bank.</p> <p> &ldquo;Although the goal was clearly stated, there were no available data referring the geographical distribution of the eligible children,&rdquo; said Eun Ji Noh, team leader. &ldquo;To make a recommendation for new sites, it was essential to figure out the locations where the client can serve as many children as possible.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Food Bank App Secreenshot" src="image.aspx?id=8817" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p> Utilizing census data, the team developed an algorithm for pinpointing high-priority areas where there are larger populations of families in need of the program with fewer distribution sites. From there, the team turned its findings into usable information by actually pinpointing community hubs like churches, schools, and parks that would reach the highest number of children.</p> <p> After efficiently identifying underserved areas, the team then developed solutions that would communicate the resulting information in a straightforward and accessible way.</p> <p> &ldquo;Our team developed a technology solution that would include current sites, potential sites, and public facility information all on a single Google Maps view to integrate the decision-making process,&rdquo; said Noh.</p> <p> Working with Heinz faculty advisor David Burke, whose has extensive experience developing large- and small-scale technology solutions in a variety of different fields, the team was able to effectively develop a user-friendly Web application with an interactive map that allowed the food bank to see where potential distribution sites were located.</p> <p> &ldquo;We determined 10 locations where about 6,000 additional eligible children could be potentially served,&rdquo; added Noh.</p> <p> &ldquo;The project itself is meaningful in that our team delivered a concrete product, which facilitated the decision-making process for our client,&rdquo; said Weiwei Liu. &ldquo;The faculty who attended our capstone presentation really think the food bank project can turn into a long-term consulting engagement where Heinz students apply their technical knowledge for local community development.&rdquo;</p> <p> The project has the potential to help thousands of families living with food insecurity, and reflects the level of quality and expertise that Heinz students apply in their work. Through collaboration, innovation, and strategic thinking, the team worked to solve a real-world problem that can lead to tangible results.</p> <p> &ldquo;We were thrilled to work with students from the Heinz School to assist us in using information to target our Summer Food Service Program outreach,&rdquo; said Karen Dreyer, Southwestern Pennsylvania Food Security Partnership Director at the food bank. &ldquo;The map that the students produced has made our outreach efforts more strategic, and we are hopeful that more children will receive meals during the summer of 2015 because of this tool.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.pittsburghfoodbank.org/" target="_blank">Learn more about the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MISM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2784Mon, 04 Jun 2015 11:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=8818photo

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Heinz College Alumnus Provides Mission-Driven Leadership in Liberia through Strategic Managementhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2780]]><p> As Peace Corps Country Director in Liberia, Kevin W. Fleming (MSPPM &rsquo;05) juggles a variety of equally important, but seemingly disparate, responsibilities on a daily basis.</p> <p> From setting the strategic vision for the day-to-day administrative responsibilities of his post, to working with the Ministry of Education to place math and science teachers in middle and high schools throughout the country, to facilitating programs that aid in the areas of infectious disease prevention, food security, and gender equality, Fleming enjoys many opportunities to explore the foundational nuances and complexities of public management.</p> <p> In doing so, he regularly utilizes technological, policy, and management strategies he learned as a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM) student at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College.</p> <p> &ldquo;Working in cross-cultural settings, and being an ex-pat managing people from other countries and other cultures, that&rsquo;s a learned skill set,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been honing those skills of working and managing people from other countries, with completely different customs and sayings, for years.</p> <p> &ldquo;Heinz prepared me for managing both folks in a cross-cultural setting, and also different functional areas in a business. So now, I can manage an ITS manager, a finance officer, communications manager, admin teams, and operations. And if I can&rsquo;t explain something in a meeting, I can go and I can build a rough database, or I can go onto what was GIS systems and work there. Having that technical knowledge that I learned in my classes helps me to bridge some of those cross-cultural gaps.&rdquo;</p> <p> From the time he was a young man, Fleming knew that he wanted to lead a life of mission-driven service. But entering his undergraduate career at Xavier University, he wasn&rsquo;t quite sure how to articulate his career goals to his friends and family members.</p> <p> &ldquo;I was part of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes group in high school, and we did some volunteerism,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;And then in college, I went on a few service learning trips to inner-city Cincinnati and Appalachia, and I was like, &lsquo;man, I really want to do this for a living.&rsquo; But I didn&rsquo;t know how to make a career out of it. And I thought I would be poor &ndash; I thought you had to take a vow of poverty like a priest to do this type of work.&rdquo;</p> <p> Through the Teach For America program, Fleming found his voice, and the blueprint for the career path he hoped to follow. As an elementary and middle school teacher in Compton, Calif., the Ohio native developed a strong desire to work in cross-cultural settings in the nonprofit sector.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was the first time that I had ever worked in a setting in the United States with any real kind of socioeconomic and racial diversity,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;It was so eye-opening, and I fell in love with it.</p> <p> &ldquo;When I did Teach For America, I learned about the whole nonprofit world and how all of these nonprofits were starting. The charter school movement was starting. People were putting money into these organizations, and they wanted people with an acumen for business that also wanted to do good to come and work for them.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Kevin Fleming in Village with Kids" src="/image.aspx?id=7801" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />Upon completing his Teach For America placement, Fleming worked for Citizen Schools, a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating after-school programs in low-income communities, before traveling to Lesotho, a tiny country within the Republic of South Africa. Here, as a Peace Corps volunteer, Fleming managed a building project for a gravity flow water system that transported water by pipe from a mountainside natural spring to a small village. It was during this time that Fleming&rsquo;s Peace Corps mentors told him he had the qualities to one day become a Peace Corps Country Director.</p> <p> &ldquo;I knew the skill set that I needed to have in order to reach this goal of eventually becoming a Country Director, and I was aware of those gaps at that time,&rdquo; recalled Fleming. &ldquo;And one of them centered around technology. What I liked about Heinz College was that technology, policy, and management were incorporated into every class. I was interested in all three of those, and I wanted to be good in all three areas.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fleming&rsquo;s desire to grow in these three areas led to his pursuit of a MSPPM degree at Heinz College, which he earned in 2005. As a first-year student, he created a program along with some of his fellow students called The Tsunami Assistance Project, which provided aid for victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.</p> <p> &ldquo;[Associate Dean] Brenda Peyser and Mark Wessel, the dean at the time, let my friends and I essentially start a nonprofit while we were in grad school; who does that?&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;They were so supportive, and that was one of the things I loved about the leadership at Heinz College. They celebrated us doing things in the community and around the globe, and above all, they encourage us to help others in need.&rdquo;</p> <p> After years of traveling the world and leading outreach programs, Fleming landed his &ldquo;dream job&rdquo; in January, when he was appointed Peace Corps Country Director for Liberia, a nation that has been ravaged by the Ebola virus. Fleming said that, through the daily challenges he faces, he often refers back to lessons learned at the Heinz College when managing in cross-cultural settings.</p> <p> &ldquo;You know, there&rsquo;s a class we took at Carnegie Mellon, Organizational Design and Implementation, where we did this lesson around informal and formal networks,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;You have your formal network structures like organizational charts, and then you have your informal structures. I always refer back to that class with my staff, because the rest of the world does not operate how we do in America around these formal structures. You have to really understand the informal lines of communication and what that means.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Peace Corps Volunteers" src="image.aspx?id=7802" style="margin: 10px; float: right; width: 30%;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s these little things that we learned in class that come up when you work in a multicultural settings that add value. I&rsquo;ve worked in four or five of these types of settings now, and this time I&rsquo;m one of three Americans that are representing a U.S. Peace Corps, but 95 percent of my staff members are Liberian. And so, how you go about strategic planning is different. How you influence and motivate people to do what they do is different. And I&rsquo;ve been able to adapt those things that I learned at the Heinz College here.&rdquo;</p> <div> <p> As he moves forward in his journey of mission driven-service, Fleming looks forward to continuing to apply the business principles he learned through his work with Teach for America, the Peace Corps, and Heinz College to the nonprofit world.</p> <p> &ldquo;To me, it&rsquo;s pretty cut and dry: if you run a sound business, then you can serve more people. And I&rsquo;ve worked extremely hard over the years to try and prove that nonprofits can be run just as efficiently as for-profits, thus allowing us to serve more people than we ever imagined.&rdquo;</p> </div> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">More information about the MSPPM Program&gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2780Mon, 01 Jun 2015 13:29:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7800photo

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Heinz Graduates Take the Stage to Celebrate their Achievements and Receive their Diplomashttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2781]]><p> &ldquo;Work hard to be an optimist. It is a simple goal, but hard to reach. Get something done. Make a difference. Think, reflect, and then act.&rdquo;</p> <p> These are just a few of the words of wisdom that Norman Y. Mineta, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation, shared during his keynote presentation at the 2015 H. John Heinz III College Commencement Ceremony.</p> <p> The ceremony, which took place on May 16 at the Petersen Events Center, featured more than 500 Carnegie Mellon University graduates from master&rsquo;s and doctorate programs formally receiving their diplomas as the culmination of their hard work at the Heinz College.</p> <p> One of those students was Michael Adjevi-Benison, a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM) graduate who was chosen by his peers to represent the Class of 2015 as the Commencement Ceremony&rsquo;s student speaker.</p> <p> In addressing the crowd of over 2,000 in attendance, Adjevi-Benison spoke of the need he&rsquo;s felt throughout his life to keep moving forward &ndash; from his childhood in Ghana growing up in a village without electricity or potable water, to the sense of accomplishment he felt in earning his MSPPM degree.</p> <p> &ldquo;We are assembled here today, not only to celebrate our academic accomplishments, but also to reaffirm our earnest desire to make the world a better place,&rdquo; said Adjevi-Benison. &ldquo;Our experiences have prepared us to go out there and shine. Maybe, we may not see each other again, but surely, we will shine together and provide the illumination the world needs.&rdquo;</p> <p> Professor Mark Wessel received the Martcia Wade Teaching Award, which recognizes a Heinz College faculty member each year for outstanding performance in the classroom and commitment to student learning.</p> <p> Wessel, who has been at Heinz College since 1993 and served as Dean of Heinz College from 2003 to 2008, just completed his final year of teaching. In one of his last acts as a faculty member, Wessel gave the students their charge near the end of the ceremony.</p> <p> &ldquo;My plea &ndash; my prayer - is that each of you will find where your sustaining faith truly lies,&rdquo; said Wessel. &ldquo;The faith that persists and sustains you in the face of imminent failure.&nbsp; The faith that enables you to find the goodness in yourself and others.&nbsp; Whether that faith lies in a person or a principle.&nbsp; A god or a nation.&nbsp; An idea or a philosophy.&nbsp; A discipline or an action.</p> <p> &ldquo;To be fully human you must, like Mother Teresa, discover in what immutable force you are willing to invest your faith for all time and to be committed to the demands that faith will inevitably place upon you.&nbsp; If you do that, no wilderness can prove too daunting.&rdquo;</p> <p> In addition to the presentation of the diplomas, a number of members of the Heinz College community were honored for their standout achievements:</p> <ul> <li> Two Heinz students were selected by the Ph.D. committee to receive the Suresh Konda Memorial Ph.D. First Research Paper Award, named in memory of alumnus Konda, who earned his MSPPM and Ph.D. at Heinz College. This year&rsquo;s recipients were Uttara Madurai Ananthakrishnan, for her paper &ldquo;A Tangled Web: Evaluating the Impact of Displaying Fraudulent Reviews on Review Portals,&rdquo; and Arslan Aziz, for his paper &ldquo;Advertisers Revenue versus Consumer Privacy in Online Advertising.&quot;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Two additional Heinz Ph.D. candidates were honored with the Outstanding Teaching Assistant Awards. Hilary Wolfendale received the Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award for the School of Public Policy and Management, and Sriram Somanchi was honored as the Outstanding Teaching Assistant for the School of Information Systems and Management.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Each year, the Barbara Jenkins Award is presented in memory of Jenkins (MSPPM &rsquo;87) to a graduating student who has demonstrated service to Heinz College and made significant contributions to the quality of life in the Pittsburgh community. Claire Goodwin, an MSPPM graduate, received this year&rsquo;s honor.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> The Otto A. Davis Award, bestowed annually in honor of the second Dean of the Heinz College, is voted on by a committee of faculty, staff, and students, and given to an individual who exemplifies the college&rsquo;s commitment to social and racial justice. This year&rsquo;s recipient was Jamie Seabrook, a Master of Public Management (MPM) graduate.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Each year, two Heinz master&rsquo;s students are recognized for their leadership and initiative, excellent academic achievement, strong communication skills, and exceptional promise for future success via the Student Leadership Awards. This year&rsquo;s recipient from the School of Public Policy and Management was Tahir Cheema, an MSPPM graduate. From the School of Information Systems and Management, Trevor Benson, a Master of Science in Information Security Policy and Management graduate, received the honor.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Erin Lovas, Assistant Director of Academic Services at Heinz College, received the Staff Excellence Award for outstanding service to the college.</li> </ul> <p> <img align="" alt="Heinz College Commencement Stage" src="/image.aspx?id=7804" style="float: left; margin: 10px; width: 30%;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Our graduates have worked very hard to reach this significant day,&rdquo; said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Heinz College. &ldquo;I would like to congratulate the graduates as well as the friends and family members who have supported them every step of the way.</p> <p> &ldquo;I would also like to recognize the outstanding faculty and administrators who have been instrumental in forging these programs and ensuring the success of today&rsquo;s graduates.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://heinz-video1.andrew.cmu.edu/Mediasite/Play/c8caa0ff16ba4f98b6d72d2b50708cbe1d" target="_blank">Watch the 2015 H. John Heinz III College Commencement Ceremony&gt;&gt;</a>&nbsp;(Please use your Andrew ID and password to access the year&#39;s video recording.)<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXt24Yh9GJI" target="_blank">Watch the 118th Carnegie Mellon University Commencement&gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2781Mon, 29 May 2015 10:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7803photo

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Heinz Students Unveilhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2779]]><p> In 2012, Robert J. Gordon, a prominent economist at Northwestern University, argued in his paper <a href="http://www.nber.org/papers/w18315.pdf" target="_blank">Is U.S. Economic Growth Over? Faltering Innovation Confronts the Six Headwinds</a> that there are no new technological advances on the horizon that are comparable to the rise of computer technology from the 1960s to today. Gordon postulated that, as a result of this lack of technological advancement, labor productivity growth would experience a continual slowdown over the next 100 years until it reaches levels not seen since the 1800s. This would signal an almost complete halt to American productivity, which would then lead to extensive economic implications.</p> <p> But is the future of U.S. productivity so bleak? A team of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College students went to the White House to prove otherwise.</p> <p> Lee Branstetter, Heinz College professor of Economics and Public Policy, initiated the research endeavor upon being contacted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Branstetter helped assemble a capstone project with a team of Master of Science in Public Policy and Management students dedicated to determining if the productivity outlook was as bad as it seemed.</p> <p> &ldquo;Even before the global financial crisis hit, productivity growth took a dive,&rdquo; said Branstetter.&nbsp; &ldquo;This is a big deal, since the most important engine for growth can be productivity.</p> <p> &ldquo;Productivity affects incomes and living standards, and the implications are stark if it doesn&rsquo;t come back.&rdquo;</p> <p> The capstone project, &ldquo;It&rsquo;s Not Over Yet: An Optimistic Take on American Productivity Growth,&rdquo; comprised of students Tara O&rsquo;Neill, Laura Tengelsen, Dennis Sawyers, Jonathan Lakey, Dini Maghfirra, and Marwa Al-Fakhri. The team&rsquo;s approach was to interview leading experts at Carnegie Mellon University in the fields of e-learning, robotics, and big data to ascertain whether any of these innovations could lead to gains in labor productivity similar to those seen in earlier periods in American history. By synthesizing industry data with expert insight and the most-up-to-date research, the team hoped to show that Robert Gordon&rsquo;s belief in a low-growth future is misplaced, and Americans can look forward to a prosperous future.</p> <p> The team chose the fields of big data, e-learning, and robotics as case studies because of their potential to dramatically increase productivity, and because of the ease of access to leaders in those fields working at Carnegie Mellon University. After all, big data is altering the way that health care, America&rsquo;s largest sector of the economy, currently operates. E-learning has experienced incredibly large gains in student outcomes in some studies, and promises a future where personalized education is available to a mass population at an affordable price for the first time in human history. Likewise, the field of robotics is steadily advancing, and has generated robots with capabilities unimaginable even 50 years ago.</p> <p> &ldquo;Fortunately, it turns out Pittsburgh is the epicenter of research on e-learning,&rdquo; said Jonathan Lakey, who, along with Laura Tingleson, researched the e-learning portion of the paper. &ldquo;There was a study done on software that was developed at Carnegie Mellon University by Robert Anderson that was found to double the amount of learning on a specific set of coursework.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team argues that e-learning provides the promise of customized learning for the masses for the first time in history. E-learning allows for an adaptive education in terms of pace and skill, and it can potentially double the amount of education one could receive yearly.</p> <p> &ldquo;Evidence is mounting that these learning technologies can be incredibly effective, and more capital is being invested in them,&rdquo; continued Lakey. &ldquo;If programs could be developed and implemented on a wide scale and across the most economically viable subjects, the potential gains in learning and, consequently, productivity, could be enormous.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Heinz Students give a presentation at the White House" src="image.aspx?id=7798" style="margin: 10px; float: left; width: 412.5px;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Robotics is a real story in terms of productivity,&rdquo; said Dennis Sawyers, who tackled the field of robotics for the project along with fellow student Dini Maghfirra. &ldquo;Prior advances in technology, especially in agriculture and manufacturing, have enhanced productivity by replacing human labor with machine labor. But a new wave of robotics innovations promise to affect a whole new range of industries: transportation, logistics, warehousing, low-skilled services, and construction.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team found studies that indicated that manufacturing productivity would increase if countries would adopt the same robot-intensity as the most automated country in each manufacturing sector. The studies estimated that productivity would increase by 1.5 percent for every one-unit increase in robots per million hours worked.</p> <p> However, the rise of robotics will not take place without its challenges.</p> <p> &ldquo;Robotics will increase productivity, but the extent and speed of the revolution can be heavily influenced by government policy,&rdquo; said Sawyers. &ldquo;Higher minimum wages and other laws that increase the cost of workers will drive automation in the United States just as it has in Europe, but even without those increases to cost of labor, automation will occur as the price of robots falls and the capabilities of robots increase.&rdquo;</p> <p> Finally, the team cited the power of big data and how it relates to the health care industry as another reason why productivity in America can be saved.</p> <p> &ldquo;The health care industry is rife with unnecessary services, inefficiently delivered services, excessive administrative costs, prices that are too high, fraud, and missed prevention opportunities,&rdquo; said Tara O&rsquo;Neill, who handled the data portion of the project with Marwa Al-Fakhri. &ldquo;Eliminating waste and inefficiencies could reduce costs significantly while simultaneously improving outcomes, much of which can be done through the use of big data and new health care information technologies.&rdquo;</p> <p> With tremendous advances in data collection, storage, processing, and analysis, the team found that proper implementation of big data can help put an end to the overuse of health care services, fraudulent claims, excessive administration costs, and inefficiently delivered care.</p> <p> &ldquo;We recognize that cost savings are not necessarily increases in productivity; however, any money that is saved and freed up in the economy can then be invested in areas of the economy that are productive,&rdquo; continued O&rsquo;Neill. &ldquo;Because most health care spending does not actually produce anything tangible or productive in the economy, any spending on it simply takes away from money available to be spent on goods and services in the economy that are productive and which create wealth. Therefore, decreasing spending on health care allows for increased spending on parts of the economy that are productive.</p> <p> &ldquo;Additionally, there are many new opportunities to improve the health of our nation&rsquo;s citizens, which will, in turn, provide for a more productive workforce.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;These really are three domains that could lead to tremendous economic growth,&rdquo; added Branstetter. &ldquo;The health care sector represents a fifth of the U.S. gross domestic product. Human skill and the education needed to learn it is an important determinant of productivity.</p> <p> &ldquo;We can move the productivity needle.&rdquo;</p> <p> Branstetter and the team were invited to the White House&rsquo;s Eisenhower Executive Offices to present their findings to Office of Science and Technology Policy. The OSTEP members were receptive to the team&rsquo;s findings, and were surprised at the potential gains in productivity that could be found.</p> <p> &ldquo;They had lots of questions and requests for follow-up discussions,&rdquo; said Sawyers. &ldquo;From a students perspective, when you&rsquo;re interacting with policymakers on their level, you realize you can do it too.</p> <p> &ldquo;You feel like you&rsquo;re actually making a difference.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">More information about the MSPPM Program&gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2779Mon, 20 May 2015 13:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7797photo

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Norman Y. Mineta, former Secretary of Transportation, to Give Keynote Address at the Heinz College Commencement Ceremonyhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2778]]><p> Secretary Norman Y. Mineta, an innovative leader in the fields of transportation, commerce, public policy, and technology, will be the keynote speaker at the Heinz College Commencement Ceremony at 2 p.m., Saturday, May 16 at the Petersen Events Center.</p> <p> For almost 30 years, Secretary Mineta represented San Jose, Calif. as a public servant - first on the City Council, then as Mayor, and then from 1975-1995 as a Member of Congress. During his time serving the Silicon Valley area, he was a pioneer in helping the tech sector engage in public policy. While in Congress, he also served as the Chairman of the House Transportation and Public Works Committee from 1992-1994, after having chaired the Subcommittee on Aviation and the Subcommittee on Surface Transportation.</p> <p> In 2000, President Bill Clinton appointed Secretary Mineta as the United States Secretary of Commerce. At the Department of Commerce, Secretary Mineta was known for his work on technology issues, for achieving international cooperation and intergovernmental coordination on complex fisheries issues, and for streamlining the patent and trademark process.</p> <p> From 2001-2006, Secretary Mineta served as Secretary of Transportation under President George W. Bush. In this capacity, <img alt="Norman Mineta" src="image.aspx?id=7784" style="float: left; width: 30%; margin: 10px;" />Secretary Mineta issued the notable order to ground all civilian air traffic on September 11, 2001. Following the events of September 11, he guided the creation of the Transportation Security Administration - an agency with more than 65,000 employees - the largest mobilization of a new federal agency since World War II. Mineta was also a vice president of Lockheed Martin, where he oversaw the first successful implementation of the EZ-Pass system in New York State.</p> <p> A graduate of the University of California, Berkley, Secretary Mineta served on the Smithsonian&rsquo;s Board of Regents from 1979 through 1995 and supported the establishment of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American program in 1997. He has been a lifelong champion of civil rights and, as a son of Japanese immigrants, spent time during World War II at an internment camp in Wyoming.</p> <p> &ldquo;Norman Mineta&rsquo;s career achievements are extraordinary, and in many ways he is the embodiment of many of our programs here at Heinz College,&rdquo; said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Heinz College. &ldquo;His life reflects the Heinz College mission, and we are looking forward to giving him a very warm reception on May 16.&rdquo;</p> <p> Recognized for his leadership, Secretary Mineta has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom &ndash; the nation&rsquo;s highest civilian honor &ndash; and the Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy, which is awarded for significant public service of enduring value to aviation in the United States.</p> <p> Currently, Secretary Mineta is the President and CEO of Mineta and Associates, LLC. He is married to Danealia (Deni) Mineta and has two sons, David K. Mineta and Stuart S. Mineta and two stepsons, Robert M. Brantner and Mark D. Brantner.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2778Mon, 07 May 2015 11:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7785photo

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Alumna Paints Broad Impact on Cultural Scenehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2777]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cmu.edu/piper/stories/2015/may/artfully-done.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> When you&rsquo;re a kid growing up abroad, moving from country to country, the arts can come in handy.</p> <p> Music, dancing, visual arts &mdash; even culinary arts &mdash; were universal languages that helped Kathryn Heidemann acclimate to every new culture she lived in, from Venezuela to Germany to the Land Down Under.</p> <p> &ldquo;There were times when I was uprooted right in the middle of a school year. Sometimes I had to learn to speak a whole new language. The arts were my means of universal communication and social survival,&rdquo; said Heidemann, director of the Heinz College&rsquo;s Master of Arts Management (MAM) program.</p> <p> They also were the foundation for a career that enables her to support the arts in ways that help ensure their survival.</p> <p> Heidemann studied dance and arts management in Chicago and enjoyed working at various arts organizations there and in New York City and Detroit, but something was missing.</p> <p> &ldquo;As a creative person I was really looking for a rigorous academic program that would unify my right and left brain, while giving my left brain a &lsquo;boost&rsquo; of sorts with quantitative management skills. I had worked in the field for a number of years and I wanted to be pushed to a whole new level with regard to data-driven management within the arts,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p> That&rsquo;s when she decided to move to Pittsburgh and enroll in Heinz College&rsquo;s MAM program. The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust hired her when she graduated, and for eight years her list of professional successes grew by leaps and bounds.</p> <p> She founded and managed 200 arts master&rsquo;s degree programs in conjunction with the Dance Council, PNC Broadway Across America and TrustPresents series. She produced 30 of the city&rsquo;s popular Gallery Crawls, which are quarterly showcases of arts entertainment. And she oversaw three First Night Pittsburgh festivals, the region&rsquo;s largest single night arts festival that takes place on New Year&rsquo;s Eve, breaking attendance records and reaching millions of students, teachers and community members during her tenure.</p> <p> During that time, she also took two working sabbaticals to assume leadership roles abroad and domestically as a venue manager for the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the world&rsquo;s largest arts festival, and as an operations manager for Jacob&rsquo;s Pillow Dance Festival in the Berkshires.</p> <p> Consider Mayor Bill Peduto among the people on whom she left a lasting impression. He recently appointed her to the City of Pittsburgh&rsquo;s Art Commission, which works to improve the aesthetic quality of the city&rsquo;s public spaces.</p> <p> &ldquo;Mayor Peduto is, was and always will be a very strong advocate for the arts. I am honored and humbled to have been chosen as an art commissioner under his leadership, and hope that my background in arts management, understanding of arts policy issues, and passion for the arts and our communities will help me be the best servant to this city that I can be,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p> Heidemann feels the arts can play a big role in fostering innovation and creativity, both within ourselves and within the community.</p> <p> &ldquo;There are ways you can do that which don&rsquo;t necessarily mean you have to be an artist for a living. The arts are a right, not a privilege. If we all tap into out inner artist, we can learn to better engage in creative problem-solving and contribute better to what we&rsquo;re doing in our own respective fields &mdash; science, technology, business and other areas.&rdquo;</p> <p> As director of the MAM program, Heidemann says she has been able to stay more connected, especially at the global level, to the arts than she has in any other job.</p> <p> She has worked at international festivals before, but her affiliation with CMU has enabled her to work on international partnerships. She leads the dual degree partnership with the University of Bologna&rsquo;s GIOCA (Graduate Degree in Innovation and Organization of Culture and the Arts) program in Italy. She enjoys working with international students and arts performers, attends many international performances and speaks at arts administration conferences around the globe.</p> <p> &ldquo;Due to the nature of my job and the diversity of my students&rsquo; interests, I have to have my finger on the pulse of every facet of the arts industry &mdash; what&rsquo;s happening in the museum, gallery, symphony, opera, theater and dance company worlds. Certainly my favorite part about the job is not just about breadth of access to the arts, but also about the people. The students and the alumni are such a rich part of what I do and make me love coming to work every day.&rdquo;</p> <p> While other universities have master of arts management programs, Heidemann says CMU&rsquo;s program is in a class all its own.</p> <p> &ldquo;What impresses me most about CMU is the students. Many of them come from arts backgrounds but learn to &lsquo;speak data&rsquo; very quickly. They quickly adapt to new ways of thinking, new ways of seeing the world and new ways of solving problems,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Many of them have specific goals in mind when they arrive here, but may quickly find a whole new course to chart and a whole new part of themselves that they didn&rsquo;t know was there. I love to see what they do, where they end up. They just continue to surprise me.&rdquo;</p> <p> And sometimes, she surprises her students. Heidemann has often been found playing bass guitar in local and national rock, punk and classic country bands.</p> <p> An active member of her community, Heidemann was recently named by Pittsburgh Magazine as one of the city&rsquo;s &ldquo;40 Under 40&rdquo; honorees for her passion, commitment and overall impact on the Pittsburgh region.</p> <p> &ldquo;Certainly, it&rsquo;s a labor of love,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s so wonderful to find myself in this cycle where I was a student of this program that I am now managing. The passion for what I did informs my new passion, which is really helping the next generation discover this exciting field of arts management and make a difference in the arts in a different kind of way.&rdquo;</p> <p> Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto (above, left) has named CMU&#39;s Kathryn Heidemann (above, right) to the city&#39;s Art Commission, which works to improve the aesthetic quality of the city&rsquo;s public spaces.</p> <p> Photo by Matte Braidic.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2777Mon, 05 May 2015 23:19:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7767photo

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Carnegie Mellon Professor Acquisti Awarded Fellowship from Carnegie Corporation of New Yorkhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1776]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/march/joel-tarr-honored.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> <em>Renowned Privacy Researcher One of Only 32 Recipients of Prestigious Honor</em></p> <p> PITTSBURGH&mdash;Carnegie Mellon University Professor Alessandro Acquisti was named today to the inaugural class of the Andrew Carnegie Fellows by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.</p> <p> Acquisti is one of only 32 recipients of the fellowship and was selected from more than 300 nominees.</p> <p> A noted economist and privacy researcher, Acquisti&rsquo;s fellowship will investigate the impact of the data economy on societal welfare and the distribution of wealth, focusing on how the erosion of privacy and how the rise of &ldquo;big data&rdquo; may affect economic growth, equality, and discrimination.</p> <p> &ldquo;I&rsquo;m pleased to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow and excited to have the opportunity to further explore the possible economic effects of the data economy through this fellowship,&rdquo; said Acquisti, associate professor of information technology and public policy at CMU&rsquo;s Heinz College. &ldquo;It is quite likely that the expanding collection, analysis, and use of large amounts of individuals&rsquo; data will bring about both positive and negative consequences for different stakeholders, and my research will explore those impacts. I thank the Carnegie Corporation for this wonderful honor.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p> <p> Acquisti&rsquo;s research investigates the economics and behavioral economics of privacy, including privacy in online social networks. His studies have been published in leading journals across diverse disciplines, including science, information technology, consumer research and marketing. Acquisti&rsquo;s 2009 study on the predictability of social security numbers received international media attention. Two years after the study, the Social Security Administration changed the assignment scheme of Social Security numbers.</p> <p> &ldquo;Alessandro&rsquo;s groundbreaking work on Privacy and its impact on society are representative of the kind of work that you will see here at the Heinz College. I am very pleased that he is named the Andrew Carnegie Fellow by the prestigious Carnegie Corporation of New York&rdquo;, said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean, CMU&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College. &nbsp;</p> <p> Carnegie Corporation is awarding up to $200,000 to each fellow, which will enable them to take sabbaticals to devote time to their research and writing. The fellowship program provides support for scholars in the social sciences and humanities and aims to provide new perspectives on the program&rsquo;s overarching theme for 2015: Current and Future Challenges to U.S. Democracy and International Order. Winning proposals address issues including policing and race, big data and privacy, the impact of the aging population and the safety of generic drugs, among other topics.&nbsp;</p> <p> <em><strong>Alessandro Acquisti (pictured above) is an Associate Professor of Information Systems and Public Policy at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University. His research investigates the economics and behavioral economics of privacy, and privacy in online social networks.</strong></em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1776Mon, 22 Apr 2015 00:20:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6741photo

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