Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College Heinz Student Highlights the Future of Women in Transportationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1756]]><p> PITTSBURGH &ndash; Zoe Levenson (<a href="retCmsId=72" target="">Master of Information Systems and Management</a> &rsquo;15) has always been interested in urban planning and the world of transportation.&nbsp; With the ever-increasing infusion of technology and innovation, the transportation industry is undergoing a complete transformation. The issues that come with rapid transformation like this require future leaders with a vested interest in the technology and analytical skills needed to solve them.&nbsp;</p> <p> Levenson endeavors to be one of those future leaders, which is why she was selected to be this year&rsquo;s recipient of the Women in Transportation Fellowship.</p> <p> &ldquo;The Women in Transportation Fellowship is an opportunity for a student like Zoe to gain systemic exposure to the industry,&rdquo; said Traffic21 Program Director Courtney Ehrlichman. &nbsp;&ldquo;From research, funding, politics, she sees how Traffic21 partners with real world agencies and organizations to get the technology out of the university and onto our streets.&rdquo;</p> <p> Levenson has already taken great strides toward earning her WIT fellowship.&nbsp; She is building a database for T-Set, the National USDOT University Transportation Center for Safety, she is conducting research with Dr. Sean Qian and the T-SET UTC Mobility Analytics Center, and she is even forming a Transportation Club on campus with a group of other students.</p> <p> &ldquo;So far we have set a vision for the club, tried out a few event types, and are beginning to develop programming for the spring to bring awareness to the campus student body about the breadth and width of the transportation industry,&rdquo; added Levenson.</p> <p> Beyond her on campus activities, Levenson is also looking towards furthering transportation technology in the region.&nbsp; She recently joined the board of the Women Transportation Seminar <em>Pittsburgh Chapter, </em>which has been partly formed by Ehrlichman.</p> <p> &ldquo;I get to work with a group of women already working in the field to form a chapter of an international organization and learning how to incorporate a non-profit,&rdquo; said Levenson.<img align="right" alt="levenson1" height="226" src="image.aspx?id=6537&amp;width=400&amp;height=267" width="339" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Not only am I developing a great network among these professional women, but I&rsquo;m also flexing my leadership muscles by being the Board Secretary and understanding the importance of this role to keep a board moving forward.&rdquo;</p> <p> This summer, Zoe will take part in an internship with Boeing, where she hopes to develop an even deeper understanding of the technology and management of transportation.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s hard to believe I&rsquo;ve only been here for two months,&rdquo; continued Levenson. &ldquo;The Traffic21 Fellow has provided me additional opportunities to supplement the skill set gained from my full Heinz course work.</p> <p> &ldquo;Through all of my experiences thus far, I am excited to be a women entering the male dominated transportation field!&rdquo;</p> <p> The Women in Transportation Fellowship, offered in partnership with the Traffic21 Institute and the T-SET University Transportation Center (UTC) is awarded every year to an incoming student who is entering the <strong>Master of Science in Public Policy and Management </strong>(MSPPM) or <strong>Master of Information Systems Management</strong> (MISM) degree programs. It is awarded to an outstanding female student who has, within the standard application for admission, demonstrated an interest and commitment to Intelligent Transportation Systems.</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3203" target="">More Information about the Women in Transportation Fellowship &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">More Information about Traffi21 &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://utc.ices.cmu.edu/utc/index.html" target="_blank">More information about T-SET &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=72" target="">More Information about the Master of Information Systems and Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1756Mon, 15 Dec 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6536photo

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New Strategic Partnerships Highlight Opportunities in Policy Educationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1755]]><p> PITTSBURGH, PA &ndash; Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College is proud to announce three new strategic partnerships aimed at providing new opportunities in graduate management education.&nbsp; The partnerships include Denison University as a Regional Education Partner and both the Chicano Latino Youth Leadership Project and the Government of Turkey&rsquo;s Ministry of Development as Organization&ndash;Based Partners.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re thrilled to announce these new partnerships,&rdquo; said Brenda Peyser, Associate Dean of School of Public Policy and Management at Heinz College.&nbsp; &ldquo;Diversity is essential to enriching intellectual exchanges and enhancing the graduate school experience. Partnerships with these three unique organizations further demonstrate our commitment to promoting diversity in our student body.&rdquo;</p> <p> With these partnerships, affiliates of these organizations and institutions gain access to significant financial support from the school. These three organizations are representative of the rich diversity in not only the Heinz College student body, but in the various perspectives one can find pursuing a graduate education at the Heinz College.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Denison Logo" height="50" src="image.aspx?id=4514&amp;width=200&amp;height=45" style="float: left;" width="222" />Denison University, located in Granville, Ohio, is one of the nation&rsquo;s leading liberal arts colleges. The university has earned a reputation for academic rigor and its commitment to preparing students for a lifetime of personal, professional and civic&nbsp;success. Denison students are known for their creative and innovative approach to problem-solving and decision-making.</p> <p> &ldquo;Over the years, Denison&rsquo;s alumni have frequently made a very positive impression on the faculty at Heinz College,&rdquo; said David Eber, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Heinz College.&nbsp; &ldquo;Denison&rsquo;s devotion to creative collaborative learning and civic engagement perfectly aligns with Heinz College&rsquo;s commitment to revolutionizing leadership and management education on the graduate level.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Denison University is an ideal educational partner for Heinz College.&rdquo;</p> <p> Another aspect of the unique graduate education that can be found at Heinz College is the varied experiences that the diverse student body is able to bring to the classroom.&nbsp; Heinz College&rsquo;s new partnership <img align="right" alt="TMoD Logo" height="150" src="image.aspx?id=4519&amp;width=225&amp;height=225" width="150" />with the Government of Turkey&rsquo;s Ministry of Development (TMoD) looks to bring this rich experience in running government organizations from across the ocean to the classroom in Pittsburgh.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s always exciting to admit students who are already working in government positions, both domestically and abroad,&rdquo; said Eber.&nbsp; &ldquo;Having already worked in the government in their home country, these students&rsquo; real-world experiences brings an in-depth perspective to both current students and faculty, enhancing the learning environment here at Heinz.&rdquo;</p> <p> Leadership is another important aspect of the Heinz College&rsquo;s graduate education. Heinz College&rsquo;s School of Public Policy and Management continually strives to not only be at the forefront of policy innovation and leadership; it endeavors to prepare the policy leaders of tomorrow. Heinz College&rsquo;s new partnership with the Chicano Latino Youth Leadership Project, Inc. (CLYLP) is another exciting opportunity to work with those future leaders.</p> <p> <img alt="cylyp_logo" src="image.aspx?id=5529&amp;width=200&amp;height=200" style="float: left; width: 150px; height: 150px; margin-left: 3px; margin-right: 3px;" />The CLYLP was organized in 1982 with the primary purpose of preparing students to participate in California&rsquo;s economic, social and political development. The CLYLP&rsquo;s new partnership with Heinz College exemplifies the school&rsquo;s commitment to promoting innovative decision-making and diverse perspectives in leadership across the public, non-profit and private sectors.</p> <p> &ldquo;We are honored by the investment in the CLYLP community being made by Carnegie Mellon University and Heinz College,&rdquo; said Fernando Ramirez, CLYLP Board President. &ldquo;This new partnership is a bridge to success for our organization, and now both Heinz College and CLYLP will be able to further enhance and develop a future in which California and all of its communities prosper as the result of a new generation of leadership.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;The CLYLP is a fantastic organization to partner with,&rdquo; added Eber. &ldquo;We share a commitment to the public policy process, as well as the development of future leaders in a wide variety of fields and disciplines.&rdquo;</p> <p> Heinz College is extrememly pround to announce these new partnerships and looks forward to seeing future policy leaders from all three of these organizations on campus starting next year.</p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=3424" target="">More information on the Denison University Partnership &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=3425" target="">More Information on the Government of Turkey&rsquo;s Ministry of Development Partnership &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> <p> <strong><a href="retCmsId=3423" target="">More information on the Chicano Latino Youth Leadership Project, Inc. Partnership &gt;&gt;</a></strong></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1755Mon, 24 Nov 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=3050photo

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Panoramic Visionhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1754]]><p> <em>This story first appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/computing/2014/fall/panoramic-vision.shtml" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> From death-defying athletic adventures to other once-in-a-lifetime moments, imagine video that can capture it all &mdash; literally. Thanks to Carnegie Mellon University spinout <a href="http://www.360fly.com/" target="_blank">360fly</a>, soon everyone will be able to catch life in the round, with interactive, one-shot, 360-degree panoramic videos.<br /> <br /> With a boost from a recent $17.8 million round of venture funding, 360fly (formerly known as EyeSee360) is gearing up for a spring 2015 launch of its new camera. The device will boast a unique 360-degree horizontal and 240-degree vertical view &mdash; the widest in the world.<br /> <br /> Apps will be android and iOS compatible with live 360-degree view, and the rugged, lightweight camera will be waterproof up to five ATMs. Orders are in from major big box stores and leading online retailers and the device is expected to be ready for sale in spring 2015, competitively priced with other popular action cameras.<br /> <br /> &quot;360fly doesn&#39;t just take a video. It adds a replay button to your world. Because your life is too glorious to be filtered, cropped or edited,&quot; said Amey Kanade (HNZ&#39;09), 360fly&#39;s director of marketing.<br /> <br /> &quot;It can fundamentally change the way people shoot, view and share video,&quot; Kanade said.<br /> <br /> Founded in 1998 by CTO Michael Rondinelli (CS&#39;01), 360fly moved from developing panoramic video to enable robotic perception to custom projects for industry and the military and the first consumer panoramic iPhone optic, GoPano.<br /> <br /> Kanade joined the company after graduation, eager for a startup experience where he could dive quickly into varied responsibilities. He got what he wanted. The software engineer rapidly found himself spending more time with customers than writing code, eventually running a crowdfunding campaign and now serving as director of marketing.<br /> <br /> While a student, the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Information Systems Management</a> graduate also took a number of classes in the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/art/" target="_blank">School of Art</a>, and found his diverse CMU training invaluable.<br /> <br /> &quot;With modern day marketing you really have to be part scientist and part artist,&quot; Kanade said. &quot;As an engineer by training on the marketing side, my entire CMU background is helping me now, both my strong platform of analytical skills and my artistic coursework.&quot;<br /> <br /> In the past year, the Pittsburgh-based company has burgeoned from seven employees to 25 and counting. The CMU spinout now numbers five CMU alumni employees.<br /> <br /> &quot;The people at Carnegie Mellon, the professors, students and staff, they push you to a different level,&quot; Kanade said. &quot;You&#39;re surrounded by so many smart people, you automatically feel the impetus of doing something better.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1754Mon, 10 Nov 2014 13:16:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4515photo

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Heinz College Alumnus Named NASA CFOhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1753]]><p> WASHINGTON DC - David P. Radzanowski, an alumnus from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College (HNZ &rsquo;90), was recently confirmed by the Senate as Chief Financial Officer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).<br /> <br /> &ldquo;It really is an honor and privilege to be confirmed for such an important position,&ldquo; said Radzanowski.<br /> <br /> Before becoming CFO, Radzanowski served as Chief of Staff and principal advisor to NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr. Prior to that, he was the Deputy Associate Administrator for Program Integration for the Space Operations Mission Directorate where he had oversight responsibility for the administrative functions of the Directorate as well as Space Shuttle Transition and Retirement activities.<br /> <br /> He received a Meritorious Presidential Rank Award in 2009 and NASA&#39;s Outstanding Leadership Medal in 2011.<br /> <br /> As CFO, Radzanowski will be in charge of developing an $18 billion, budget which will then face Congressional approval, as well as managing all of NASA&rsquo;s business processes.&nbsp; &ldquo;It&rsquo;s no easy feat,&rdquo; said Radzanowski.&nbsp; &ldquo;When managing this large of an organization with this amount of money, you want to make sure you use it wisely.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Ultimately, I want to work towards leaving things in better shape than they were when I arrived.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Radzanowski credits the &ldquo;fantastic experience&rdquo; he had at Heinz College with preparing him for where he is today.&nbsp; &ldquo;It was an inflection point in my life,&rdquo; said Radzanowski.&nbsp; &ldquo;I was worried about entering the program after having such a quantitative background, but it offered such an easy transition into the realm of public policy.&nbsp; Carnegie Mellon University was so technologically forward at the time and the university offered such a great experience in fulfilling my needs.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Beyond the qualitative and quantitative coursework, Radzanowski cites many of the leadership-driven courses with helping him attain his goals.&nbsp; &ldquo;I remember the public speaking and creative writing classes very well,&rdquo; continued Radzanowski.&nbsp; &ldquo;Without being able to explain science and technology to people, especially in a position like mine, you won&rsquo;t be successful.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Ultimately, I came to Heinz College for a foundation and I left with real world skills that were designed for facing real world problems.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=134" target="">More information about the MSPPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1753Mon, 06 Nov 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4513photo

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Heinz College Systems Project Serves as Neutral Ground for Political Partieshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1752]]><p> PITTSBURGH - Six graduate students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College are conducting a research project analyzing shifting voting trends in the region. The project, which is jointly sponsored by the Pennsylvania Democratic Party and the Republican Party of Allegheny County, leaves behind the typical political dialogue associated with elections and instead focuses on the data that each election presents and how each party can better utilize that information in the future.</p> <p> &ldquo;Allegheny County is interesting in that registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans more than 2 to 1.&rdquo; said Jon Nehlsen, Heinz College&rsquo;s Senior Director of External Relations.&nbsp; &ldquo;Yet Republicans still win some county and state wide races.</p> <p> &ldquo;The students wanted to understand this phenomenon and looked to the data available to find the answer.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team reasoned that Republicans could win races through superior voter turnout or if registered Democrats broke ranks and &ldquo;swing&rdquo; for Republican candidates.&nbsp; They are working on modeling the factors that cause area voters to turn out as well as analyzing the demographics of &ldquo;swing voters&rdquo;.</p> <p> Party leaders are interested in the results in hopes that the students might challenge some of their old assumptions about area voters and lend a fresh perspective from students, all in their 20&rsquo;s, none of whom originally hail from the region.&nbsp; &ldquo;Interacting with the students revealed to me several areas where both parties can advance the cause of good government by improving our communications and outreach to a younger audience,&rdquo; said Republican Chairman Jim Roddey.</p> <p> Among the insights that the students have uncovered is that political language on social media in this election year tends to be compartmentalized.&nbsp; For example, men and women may care about the same issues but they use very different language on social media to describe their concerns.&nbsp; Additionally, the students found that when political parties and advocacy groups push their agendas on Twitter, it appears to have little measurable resonance with individuals.</p> <p> The project also has the unique opportunity of being conducted during a gubernatorial election year in Pennsylvania.&nbsp; &ldquo;In today&#39;s political world, effective voter outreach through data mining is essential if you want to be successful,&rdquo; said Jim Burn, Chairman of the Democratic Party in PA.</p> <p> The students are hopeful that some of the insights they uncover will help the parties manage future elections.&nbsp; &ldquo;It was really interesting to find out how similar both parties really are,&rdquo; said project team member Geoffrey Arnold.&nbsp; &ldquo;Everyone is interested in &lsquo;swing voters&rsquo; as well as younger voters and how they approach elections.</p> <p> &ldquo;They&rsquo;re not so different, they just want different things.&rdquo;</p> <p> Arnold, 27, is from Lancaster PA making him the only student from the Commonwealth.&nbsp; The other team members and their hometowns are:</p> <p> Sahar Momand, Los Angeles CA</p> <p> Ji Zhang, Beijing, China</p> <p> Zach Palomo, Hondo TX</p> <p> Robert Saul, Tucson AZ</p> <p> Isaac Guzman, Mexico City</p> <p> The project has brought about some unprecedented bipartisan cooperation, especially for an election year. &ldquo;&quot;It was not only an opportunity for the two major political parties to come together to jointly work with the students but also a rewarding experience to be involved with bright, young men and women interested in better understanding the political process,&rdquo; said Roddey.</p> <p> &ldquo;It has been a pleasure working with the students and faculty at CMU along with Republican Chairman Jim Roddey on this project,&rdquo; added Burn.</p> <p> &ldquo;(The students) are spot on in their analysis of what Jim Roddey and I are looking to do by way of voter turnout, messaging and what is needed in order to effectuate an effective plan.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=134" target="">For more information about the Master of Public Policy Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1752Mon, 30 Oct 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4507photo

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Heinz Alumna Anne Lewis Named Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvaniahttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1751]]><p> HARRISBURG&mdash; Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett and First Lady Susan Corbett recognized Anne Lewis, an alumna of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, as one of nine outstanding women from across the state receiving this year&rsquo;s <a href="http://distinguisheddaughtersofpa.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/10-21-14.pdf" target="_blank">Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania</a> award.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Each one of these women has shown a tremendous commitment to making the world around her a better place,&rdquo; said Gov. Corbett. &ldquo;It is my honor to today name them as the Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania. Their dedication, commitment, compassion and drive have impacted the lives of so many.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> The mission of Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania is to honor outstanding women for extraordinary service and contributions to the Commonwealth of PA. Since 1949, the Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania has celebrated women leaders from diverse backgrounds, including education, science, law, medicine, business, public service, philanthropy, humanities and the arts. The women are nominated to receive the honor by non-profit organizations within Pennsylvania.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Having lived my entire life in Pennsylvania and having devoted most of it to philanthropic work here, I couldn&#39;t imagine a greater honor,&rdquo; said Lewis. &ldquo;And when you look at the list of other Distinguished Daughters down through the years&mdash;from Pearl S. Buck to Annie Dillard&mdash;I find I&#39;m in some pretty impressive company. So it&#39;s also quite humbling.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> As a business leader, Anne Lewis is Board Chair and co-owner of Oxford Development Company, one of Pittsburgh&rsquo;s most prominent privately owned enterprises. Committed to the region, Anne gives back to the community though her work as a volunteer and member of various governing boards, including the Dean&rsquo;s Advisory Council at Heinz College.<br /> <br /> Lewis&rsquo; experience with Heinz College goes back further than her time on the Dean&rsquo;s Advisory Council.&nbsp; In 1990, Lewis earned a <a href="retCmsId=167" target="">Master of Public Management Degree</a> from Heinz that helped prepare her for her future achievements.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Although I was involved in philanthropy and non-profit organizations before I came to Heinz, I think my experience here helped equip me with the leadership skills to accomplish my goals,&rdquo; said. &ldquo;In my experience, a lot of charitable organizations have noble ambitions and wonderful ideas, but it takes institutional knowledge, like what I received at Heinz College, and an ability to read the public policy &lsquo;terrain&rsquo; to turn those visions into reality.</p> <p> &ldquo;I don&#39;t know of a school anywhere that does a better job of providing the indispensable analytical skills you need to make a difference.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=167" target="">More information on the MPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1751Mon, 29 Oct 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4506photo

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Dean Ramayya Krishnan to Speak on Data Analytics at Inaugural KL Converge Conferencehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1750]]><p> The Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) is hosting an inaugural three-day KL Converge 2014 conference in Kuala Lumpur.&nbsp; The conference, which is expecting more that 20,000 visitors, looks to provide a new platform for multimedia, communications, content and creative industry players to share ideas and create new opportunities in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.<br /> <br /> One of the tools necessary to achieve this is Big Data and the analytical tools to get the most out of it.&nbsp; Which is why the KL Converge conference turned to Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College and a leader in the field of data analytics, to give a keynote speech on the topic.<br /> <br /> Dean Krishnan&rsquo;s keynote speech, &ldquo;All Data Big and Small; Data Analytics and You&rdquo;, will be presented to both the conference and to ministers from nine of the ASEAN countries.&nbsp; Dean Krishnan&rsquo;s primary focus is on how to enable technological advances through policy and innovation, through identification of tech and data &ldquo;enablers&rdquo; and how they are able to innovate and advance.<br /> <br /> Big Data can be a valuable tool for economic development in the Southeast Asian region.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re in the midst of a &lsquo;Data Tsunami&rsquo;,&rdquo; said Krishnan.&nbsp; &ldquo;There has been explosive growth in the size complexity and rates in which we can gather data.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Enabled by mobile phones, social media, email, videos, images, click streams, Internet transactions and the increasing prevalence of sensors, Krishnan points out that we are in an &ldquo;Age of Data&rdquo;, where data can be used to create actionable information leading to timely and more informed decisions.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;By coupling roadway sensors, traffic cameras, and individuals&rsquo; GPS devices, we can reduce traffic congestion and generate significant savings in time and fuel costs,&rdquo; said Krishnan.&nbsp; &ldquo;We can transform formal and informal education, we can engender economic development with mobile banking in rural markets, we can even save lives by developing methods of accurately predicting natural disasters.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> &ldquo;From all of this data, we derive knowledge which then leads to action.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Krishnan continues that by integrating this new data with &ldquo;legacy&rdquo; data, such as information from public health and statistical agencies, countries can better ascertain the data that is actionable for them, bringing about real change.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;We need to be problem driven,&rdquo; concluded Krishnan.&nbsp; &ldquo;We need to support both bottom up and strategic planning on problems and initiatives that are likely to benefit from data analytics and enable their use of these technologies.<br /> <br /> Krishnan&rsquo;s keynote speech at KL Converge will take place today, September 19th.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://klconverge.com/" target="_blank">For more info on KL Converge &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1750Mon, 19 Sep 2014 12:41:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=2729photo

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Summer Jobshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1749]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/creativity/2014/summer/summer-jobs.shtml" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> This summer, students from Carnegie Mellon University&#39;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/arts-management-mam/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Arts Management</a> (MAM) program plunged into competitive internships at world-renowned institutions from coast-to-coast and beyond.<br /> <br /> At organizations such as the <a href="http://whitney.org/">Whitney Museum</a>, the <a href="http://www.guggenheim.org/">Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum</a>, <a href="http://www.americansforthearts.org/">Americans for the Arts</a>, the <a href="http://www.theoneill.org/about-us/">Eugene O&#39;Neill Theater Center</a> and <a href="http://www.washingtonperformingarts.org/">Washington Performing Arts</a>, interns created employee manuals, wrote communication plans for member newsletters, analyzed ticket sales data and created millennial-engagement strategies.<br /> <br /> The MAM program&#39;s unique setup helps students rise to the top of applicant pools.<br /> <br /> &quot;The primary reason people choose our program is because of the quantitatively-focused and practical curriculum &mdash; students come out with robust skills in economics, marketing, technology and finance within the context of arts and culture,&quot; said MAM Program Director <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=471" target="_blank">Kathryn Heidemann</a>. &quot;We also create an experiential learning environment that extends far beyond the classroom. Through internships, apprenticeships, capstone projects with real-life clients and other hands-on exercises, we really want the students to learn by doing and provide a platform for cultivating leadership.&quot;<br /> <br /> Jennifer Moreci (MAM&#39;15) put her experience to work at the Americans for the Arts. She wrote topic briefings for the Seminar for Leadership in the Arts and the National Arts Policy Roundtable, both focused on the intersection of arts and technology.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> &quot;I had a really solid foundation of knowledge to write these papers for our constituents. I was able to delve even further into field research to create a clear picture for our guests, but also broaden my own literacy of the subject,&quot; Moreci said. &quot;It was rewarding to be able to share some of the accomplishments I witnessed during my time at CMU from the <a href="http://studioforcreativeinquiry.org/" target="_blank">STUDIO for Creative Inquiry</a> and many of our other successful interdisciplinary initiatives.&quot;<br /> <br /> Stewart Urist (MAM&#39;15) broadened his resume. Already experienced in ticket sales, marketing and fundraising, he opted into the O&#39;Neill Theatre&#39;s business office. There he reconciled the bank accounts, revamped the employee manual, and prepared weekly reports on the operating accounts.<br /> <br /> His experience at CMU and at the O&#39;Neill sharpened his career focus.<br /> <br /> &quot;I came in to the program with the very firm goal of getting the skills I needed to found a youth-focused theater, producing work for kids, by kids. I&#39;m very still passionate about this model, and about providing opportunities for children to engage with the arts. However, my time at CMU and with the O&#39;Neill has also given me a love for companies which develop new work and provide opportunities for emerging artists. I&#39;d love to be able to find a way to feed both of these passions in the future,&quot; Urist said.<br /> <br /> Messay Derebe (MAM&#39;15), who had a career in finance and plays the violin, joined the MAM program to learn about the arts industry.<br /> <br /> &quot;The CMU program is perfect because it incorporates the quantitative skills, like analytics, with the qualitative, like change management and strategic thinking,&quot; Derebe said.<br /> <br /> Her internship at the Washington Performing Arts was all about change. The organization was going through a rebranding process.<br /> <br /> &quot;Seeing the structural and cultural transformation that a change like that necessitates was fascinating, even if at times, uncomfortable. It was change-management in action,&quot; Derebe said.<br /> <br /> Cicely Wootan (MAM&#39;00) is the director of corporate development at the Guggenheim Museum. She has worked with a number of MAM interns. She starts talking with potential candidates as early as October.<br /> <br /> &quot;I like to have them because of the experience they tend to bring to the job and to help support the MAM program,&quot; Wootan said. &quot;Their education sets them up to succeed in this internship.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1749Mon, 08 Sep 2014 15:49:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4458photo

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CMU in Haitihttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1748]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/society/2014/summer/cmu-in-haiti.shtml" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> Since a catastrophic earthquake ripped apart Haiti in 2010, Carnegie Mellon University has provided ongoing support to the Caribbean island nation through a patchwork of outreach organizations.<br /> <br /> CMU in Haiti, a new student organization, has taken that effort and is guiding collaboration inside and outside the university going forward.<br /> <br /> Four years ago, the university community worked with fundraising for Brothers&#39; Brothers Foundation, the nonprofit Hopital Albert Schweitzer Haiti (HAS) and the American Red Cross.<br /> <br /> &quot;With the leadership of then Student Body President Rotimi Abimbola (DC&#39;10) the campus community really showcased collaboration and the values of compassion and willingness to go above and beyond for the global community,&quot; said M. Shernell Smith, assistant director of the Office of the Dean of <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/student-affairs/">Student Affairs</a>.<br /> <br /> Last week, HAS attended CMU&#39;s Volunteer Fair in hopes of partnering with the university. The nonprofit and CMU are in talks about a possible program in January 2015 with the theme &quot;Revisiting Haiti: 5 years later.&quot;<br /> <br /> CMU in Haiti took its first trip to the country during spring break this year. The idea for the group came from a freshman seminar course, &quot;The Uses and Abuses of Haiti,&quot; taught by Michael West, a teaching professor of <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/modlang/undergraduate/french.html" target="_blank">French and Francophone Studies</a>.<br /> <br /> &quot;[Our] goal is to provide support for on-the-ground, humanitarian efforts and to assist in the enduring effort of rebuilding Haiti through advocacy, service trips and collaboration with Haitian grassroots organizations and their leaders,&quot; said CMU in Haiti President Laura Scherb (<a href="http://www.hss.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">DC&#39;16</a>). &quot;We aim to strengthen the existing links between Haiti and Carnegie Mellon University &mdash; including the broader Pittsburgh community &mdash; and to celebrate a global and cultural exchange by focusing on issues of development, infrastructure, education and health.&quot;<br /> <br /> Scherb said it&#39;s also been rewarding to connect to organizations run by CMU alumni.<br /> <br /> One group is Team Tassy, which is committed to giving Haitians the resources they need to work toward sustainability. Vivien Luk (HNZ&#39;07) serves as Team Tassy&#39;s executive director.<br /> <br /> &quot;Working at Team Tassy allows me to use my CMU training and past work experience to tackle one of our world&#39;s biggest challenges &mdash; global poverty,&quot; Luk said. &quot;CMU provided me with the analytical skills to understand the fight the poor face everyday and to figure out what we need to do together to end it.&quot;<br /> <br /> Luk started at Team Tassy in 2012 after receiving a phone call from CMU alumna Jenna Knapp (HNZ&#39;09) to talk about Team Tassy&#39;s sister for-profit, Thread.<br /> <br /> &quot;They were looking for someone to build the nonprofit from the ground up. My CMU training and thesis project was where I got the foundation to do this,&quot; Luk said. &quot;The Team Tassy/Thread partnership model made a lot of sense in terms of building on the strongest assets of both entities to solve a major challenge.&quot;<br /> <br /> This year will mark Team Tassy&#39;s Third Annual Great American Water Balloon Fight, which helps raise money and awareness for Haiti. The event will be on Sept. 6 at Schenley Plaza in Oakland.<br /> <br /> Scherb, along with other members of CMU in Haiti, will be at the event helping to make sure everything goes as planned. They will be assisting with the &quot;filling parties&quot; to make sure there are plenty of water balloons, as well as helping with general crowd control.<br /> <br /> &quot;We&#39;re going to volunteer with [Team Tassy&#39;s] coordination planning and make sure that the event runs smoothly,&quot; Scherb said.<br /> <br /> Scherb is still unsure as to what she wants to do when she graduates, but she does know one thing &mdash; she wants to make a difference.<br /> <br /> &quot;I have many different interests and passions, but one that will never change is the drive to make an impact in people&#39;s lives. Whether that manifests itself through living and working in Haiti or in the United States, I will never be able to forget the people I met and the experiences I had in Haiti,&quot; Scherb said.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1748Mon, 03 Sep 2014 11:15:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4450photo

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Who Gains? Jobs from the Redevelopment of the Almono Site in Hazelwoodhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1747]]><p> In 2002, four southwestern Pennsylvania foundations formed a limited partnership with RIDC, a non-profit private development organization as general partner, and purchased the 178 acre LTV Steel Hazelwood site. &nbsp;The partnership was convinced that this remarkable riverfront plateau offered a rare opportunity to set a new standard for urban riverfront property development. The name <a href="http://almono.org/">Almono</a> came from the three Pittsburgh rivers - the <strong>Al</strong>legheny, <strong>Mon</strong>ongahela, and the <strong>O</strong>hio.</p> <p> The Almono Partners envision a master-planned development, maximizing local and regional impact, as well as employing development and economic &quot;Best Practices&quot; from across the globe. &nbsp;Almono&#39;s focus on the long-term sustainability of the project is paramount to the planning effort. &nbsp;Environmental sustainability, including alternate sources of energy, storm and waste water management and transportation innovation are key components of the plan. &nbsp;The ownership&#39;s ability to be patient in terms of financial return, supports the Partnerships&#39; goal of avoiding piecemeal, uncoordinated, or disconnected development.</p> <p> Across the street from the Almono site sits Hazelwood. Hazelwood consists of four ethnically and culturally diverse neighborhoods: Hazelwood, Glenwood, Glen Hazel, and Riverside, or &ldquo;Below the Tracks.&rdquo; Hazelwood has never recovered from the closing of the mill facilities at Almono.&nbsp; The community has lost much of its population base, most of its business district and much of its sense of community.</p> <p> Working for <a href="http://www.ura.org/business_owners/powerup_pittsburgh.php">Power Up Pittsburgh</a> (a joint initiative of the Mayor&rsquo;s Office, CMU, Pitt, the URA and several other EDOs), a team of Heinz students took a hard look at both the potential economic impact of the plans for the site, and the extent to which the residents of these communities might benefit in terms of employment and proprietorship opportunities.&nbsp; They found a project with enormous economic potential which if realized would be a huge win for the City.&nbsp; They also found that without intentional planning and support by the Almono partnership and local government, little guaranteed that the residents of the Hazelwood would see jobs.</p> <p> The team began by generating and characterizing employment impacts from the development and operation of the site.&nbsp; Construction jobs were calculated from the planned square feet of land use (commercial/office, residential, industrial), the estimated construction cost per square foot, and estimates of construction &ldquo;job years&rdquo; via input-output analysis.&nbsp;</p> <p> The team then estimated aggregate on site employment using typical job density ratios for commercial, industrial or office space.&nbsp; As the tenants that will occupy the site is not yet known, the team consulted projected employment growth by industry from the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, and identified a plausible set of industries that might be attracted to the Almono development site given projected trends and targeted industries.&nbsp;</p> <p> National industry-occupation matrices were then used to estimate what types (occupations) and number of positions these industries might generate.&nbsp; Occupations were then compared based on wages and educational requirements based on information from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics and Pennsylvania&rsquo;s Center for Workforce Information and Analysis.</p> <p> In terms of overall impact, the team found that the direct employment impact of a large development project would indeed be large.&nbsp; Based on their assumptions the twenty year build out would result in over 3,200 construction job years, and that once fully developed, the site would support over 3,800 direct jobs on site.&nbsp;</p> <p> The team also identified three other sources of increased economic activity from Almono that nearby communities might be able to tap, all of which were found to have large potential impacts.</p> <p> One source was expected &ldquo;first tier&rdquo; supplier-spending from firms on site.&nbsp; Spending was estimated by generating an estimate of sales based on projected employment levels, and using industry supplier spending patterns from input-output tables to generate supply purchase by industry.&nbsp; Based on their assumed scenario for Almono, the team found that the firms of Almono could require up to $8.2M in purchases in service and retail sectors that could plausibly locate or be located in the area (print shops, business support services, restaurants, etc.).&nbsp;</p> <p> A second source was ancillary spending of the 3,800 on site workers.&nbsp; Based on rough estimates of weekly worker spending, they calculated workers could bring up to $19M in additional annual spending to the Hazelwood area per year.&nbsp;</p> <p> Finally, the current vision plan for the development also calls for almost 1,400 additional housing units to be built on the Almono site, which could represent an increase in household spending.&nbsp; Since the extent to which these units will include affordable housing remains uncertain, the team constructed three scenarios for tenant mix.&nbsp; They then used ESRI Business Analyst&rsquo;s Tapestry geodemographic system to simulate spending patterns by lifestyle segment and patterns, and found that if were built and occupied, total residential spending power in the area could rise from $31M up to $80M.</p> <p> These increases in spending represent clear opportunities to bring back the business district in Hazelwood.&nbsp; But which types of retail would be most promising?&nbsp; To account for local competition, the team also conducted a gap analysis using Business Analyst, and found that even when competing shopping centers in the area were included, thirteen to twenty five categories of retail demand would not be met by the current retail landscape around Almono after the build out.&nbsp;</p> <p> The team then used ESRI&rsquo;s ArcView to develop a gravity model to estimate the proportion of demand that a grocery store in Hazlewood might capture from nearby competitors if one re-opened in Hazelwood (the area is currently effectively a food desert).</p> <p> The team also found that their estimates of employment and proprietorship opportunities are subject to great uncertainties.&nbsp; &nbsp;These include the extent to which the build out materializes, and the specific employment needs of the industries and firms attracted.&nbsp; But if Almono is built and occupied as planned, projections indicate the employment footprint will be large regardless of what kinds of industries locate there.&nbsp; Whether current local residents will be able to successfully capture the employment opportunities that result from this economic boom is another matter.</p> <p> For example, the team found that the national occupational structure for some of the industries that might land in Almono implied that a significant number of good paying, attainable entry level jobs could be generated by Almono.&nbsp; However, these numbers were based on &ldquo;average&rdquo; national occupational structures for the proposed industries, and for any specific firm, the number of accessible jobs might vary from near zero to many.&nbsp; To cite an extreme local case as an example, while Google&rsquo;s addition was undoubtedly a huge boon for the Bakery Square redevelopment and the ongoing wave of development in the East Liberty area, the firm does not employ significant numbers of residents (if any) from the neighborhood of Larimer.</p> <p> But if they do arrive, &ldquo;accessible&rdquo; employment opportunities at via Almono will still be open to the labor market.&nbsp; That means that local residents will still have to compete with job seekers near and far for plausibly attainable positions, even as would-be entrepreneurs in the community (whether experienced or green) will also have to compete with regional entrepreneurs and perhaps even national chains for the Almono retail and business services dollar.</p> <p> Given that market competition may limit the number of opportunities residents can seize, to what extent does public policy encourage &ldquo;some&rdquo; local employment near brownfield sites?&nbsp; To answer this question a literature review and interviews with personnel from the EPA, DCED, and other practitioner and academic SMEs was conducted. In the end they found that federal, state, and local policies and programs that foster industrial brownfield development do relatively little to ensure local employment.&nbsp; Even the local <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/news/2013/01/10/ura-board-votes-pursue-tif-plan-for.html?page=all">TIF</a> enacted by the City of Pittsburgh to move the Almono plan forward, for example, contained no specific provisions for the employment of Hazelwood residents.&nbsp; That said the team also found that current policies do not forbid tools that could help, such as Community Benefit Agreements, if project stakeholders are willing to support them.</p> <p> Because of the Bakery Square case, the team was charged with taking a hard look at sole proprietorship opportunities as an avenue of employment for local residents.&nbsp; While it is clear that opportunities could emerge, it is less clear that supports are in place to help new, inexperienced entrepreneurs in the neighborhood to seize them.&nbsp; A literature review and set of interviews with a half dozen small business development programs in the region suggested that relatively little emphasis or specific programming was available or targeted at low income white or African American proprietors, with one exception: <a href="http://www.bridgewaycapital.org/">Bridgeway Capital</a>.</p> <p> The team&rsquo;s findings imply that if and as Almono succeeds, more will need to be done to see that local residents have a chance of connecting with the opportunities that arise.</p> <p> Special thanks to Power Up Pittsburgh for serving as the client for this project.&nbsp;&nbsp; Thanks also to the team&rsquo;s advisory board members from RIDC, the Hazelwood Initiative, the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, Action Housing, Western Pennsylvania&rsquo;s Brownfields Center, World Class Industrial Networks, Bridgeway Capital, and the Office of (then) Councilman Bill Peduto.&nbsp;</p> <p> Members of the student team included Ahsan Ahmad, Zachary Best, Peter Brewton, Aneeq Cheema, Pat Gibson, Ethan Hayes, Stephanie Lagos, and Jamie Passinault.&nbsp; Greg Lagana of the Heinz College&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/ced">Center for Economic Development</a> served as faculty advisor.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1747Mon, 01 Aug 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=3050photo

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Heinz Students Break Down Barriers to Urban Development in State Transportation Policieshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1745]]><p> In 2002, four southwestern Pennsylvania foundations formed a limited partnership with the Regional Industrial Development Corporation of Southwestern Pennsylvania (RIDC), a non-profit private development organization as general partner, and purchased the 178 acre LTV Steel Hazelwood site. &nbsp;The partnership was convinced that this remarkable riverfront plateau offered a rare opportunity to set a new standard for urban riverfront property development. The name Almono came from the three Pittsburgh rivers - the Allegheny, Monongahela, and the Ohio.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="almono2" height="62" src="image.aspx?id=4355&amp;width=500&amp;height=62" width="500" /></p> <p> The Almono Partners envision a master-planned development, maximizing local and regional impact, as well as employing development and economic &quot;Best Practices&quot; from across the globe. &nbsp;Almono&#39;s focus on the long-term sustainability of the project is paramount to the planning effort. &nbsp;Environmental sustainability, including alternate sources of energy, storm and waste water management and transportation innovation are key components of the plan. &nbsp;The ownership&#39;s ability to be patient in terms of financial return, supports the Partnerships&#39; goal of avoiding piecemeal, uncoordinated, or disconnected development.</p> <p> There&rsquo;s just one problem.&nbsp; Permission for the planned development hinged on the results of a Traffic Impact Study required by PENNDOT.&nbsp; Based on the study results, PENNDOT drew the conclusion that the Almono development would generate enough vehicular traffic on an already congested corridor to require substantive mitigation, and that this should take the form of thirty million dollars in additional infrastructure investments for ramp lengthening and street widening to accommodate the additional automobile traffic.</p> <p> The Almono partnership politely disagreed and that&rsquo;s where Heinz College came in.&nbsp; RIDC teamed up with the College&rsquo;s Traffic 21 Smart Transportation Institute which led to an MSPPM student project to assess of PENNDOT&rsquo;s Transportation Impact Guidelines.&nbsp; Advised by consultant Richard Feder, and an advisory board that included representatives from the Port Authority of Allegheny County, the Urban Development Authority of Pittsburgh, the Planning Department of the City of Pittsburgh, GAI Consultants, CMU&rsquo;s Remaking Cities Institute, BikePGH, the Hazelwood Initiative, and Traffic 21 and RIDC, the students took a hard look of the appropriateness of TIS guideless for urban mixed use developments and using Almono as a case study, found a variety of ways such policies could be improved.</p> <p> The team&rsquo;s work focused on policies and procedures for trip generation estimates for mixed use developments, modal split estimation and assumptions, and the scope of acceptable mitigation strategies.</p> <p> They began with a benchmarking of several state and large urban TIS guidelines.&nbsp; The review found that, in fairness to PENNDOT, many states appear to use similar guidelines, often relying on the same standardized methods and assumptions.&nbsp; For example, many state guidelines for trip generation rely on the Institute of Transportation Engineers&rsquo; (ITE) Trip Generation Manual.&nbsp; But common criticisms of the ITE are that its models are not sensitive to specific cases of mixed use developments, that they are dependent on data from suburban and exurban locations rather than urban sites, and that they only generate automobile traffic, not public transit, bicycle, or walking trips.</p> <p> Next, the team then identified some alternative approaches to develop trip generation and modal split estimates for the Almono development and ran some numbers.&nbsp; They settled on the EPA&rsquo;s Generation Tool for Mixed Use Developments (the MXD model), which among other advantages is sensitive to the land uses of mixed use development, and the potential interactions between them, (such that, for example, some shopping trips for residents on the site might be captured by retail on the site with a walk, rather than a drive to store elsewhere).&nbsp; MXD also produces trip generation estimates for public transit and walk/bike trips. For a full build out scenario of Almono, their first pass at the MXD tool indicated a 24% reduction in projected automobile traffic compared to the standard ITE approach.</p> <p> Then the team examined PENNDOT&rsquo;s guidelines for estimating the modal split of generated trips (auto, bicycle, transit, etc.).&nbsp; They found that PENNDOT allows the use of an array of general adjustment factors to account for the presence of conditions that might encourage increased transit or bike/walk trips such that vehicular traffic is reduced, and noted that PENNDOT&rsquo;s guidelines also allow for the use of transit studies (for Philadelphia and Pittsburgh only) to assess the likely effectiveness of case specific strategies to increase the use of alternative modes.&nbsp; Along those lines, based on an examination of data from the American Community Survey, projections from the Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission, and real time data from Automatic Passenger Counter systems from Port Authority, the team reached two conclusions. One, the City and region are already achieving shares of alternative modes (walking, transit, bicycling) than are allowed for in the PennDOT guidelines. This directly indicates that current guidelines significantly overestimate automobile trips. Two, concrete steps to increase the use of transit to and from the site ought to be considered, including restoring bus service (cut back earlier this year as part of a system-wide retrenchment by Port Authority, limiting and charging for on site parking, and encouraging on site employers to partner with Port Authority for free transit pass programs.</p> <p> Finally, the team took a hard look at alternative mitigation strategies to the proposed $30 million in infrastructure required by PENNDOT, both based on the literature and the experience of three other successfully developed brownfield sites in the city: Southside Works, The Waterfront, and the recent Bakery Square development.&nbsp; One of their most remarkable discoveries, well known to all parties, was that the intersections in the area of the Almono site are already congested enough with auto traffic to warrant (under PENNDOT guidelines) substantive intervention&hellip;and construction has yet to begin!&nbsp; This raised interesting questions on the utility of past policies to prevent such congestion, and the fairness of requiring the partnership to pay for the congestion generated by past development.&nbsp; Using Google Live data, the partnership was able to assess the success of a range of traffic mitigation strategies (from cheap to expensive) at the Waterfront and Bakery Square brownfield sites, including signage, signalization, signal optimization, turning lanes new roads and extensions.&nbsp; In short, what they found is that more often that not, depending on the impacted intersection and time of day (AM/PM peak hours), years after both major developments were complete, levels of service (LOS&hellip;a.k.a congestion and waiting times)&nbsp; either held steady or marginally improved.&nbsp; This occurred in the presence of lower cost mitigation strategies, strong levels of transit service, and favorable conditions for pedestrian travel.</p> <p> Their final report included a warning that previous estimates of auto trip generation may be overstated, and the alternative mode split may be underestimated.&nbsp; In terms of traffic impact mitigation strategies for Almono, in addition to enhanced transit service, they recommended increased bicycle infrastructure, employer transportation management strategies, and complete street ordinances.&nbsp; The report concluded with an observation on public policy, that the City of Pittsburgh is empowered to adapt its own TIS guidelines if it wanted to.</p> <p> This system project is just one of several related to transportation policy in the Pittsburgh region that Heinz students have tackled.&nbsp; Other recent examples include &ldquo;Putting Intelligent Transportation to Work&rdquo; and &ldquo;The Community and Economic Impacts of Bus Rapid Transit&rdquo;, both for Port Authority of Allegheny County.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1745Mon, 29 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4354photo

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James Jordan Appointed to Board of Directors of the Pittsburgh Venture Capital Associationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1744]]><p> James Jordan, Distinguished Service Professor in Healthcare &amp; Biotechnology Management and Senior Director of Healthcare &amp; Biotechnology Programs at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College, has been appointed to the Board of Directors of the Pittsburgh Venture Capital Association.</p> <p> Jordan is an accomplished Fortune 20-level executive with experience in industry and consulting, along with his academic leadership at Heinz College. A recognized expert in translational innovation, market development and guiding the successful formation of entrepreneurial startup businesses in the Life Sciences Industry, Jordan joined the Pittsburgh Life Sciences Greenhouse (PLSG) in 2005 and became Vice President and Chief Investment Officer in 2007. He is also a Managing Director of the PLSG Accelerator Fund, a for-profit venture formed by the PLSG.</p> <p> The Pittsburgh Venture Capital Association was founded in 1982 to catalyze venture investment and entrepreneurialism in Western Pennsylvania.&nbsp; Through a wide range of programs, the PVCA facilitates quality deal flow, encourages investor collaboration, and fosters important relationships with key service providers. Every major regional venture capital firm is represented in its membership.&nbsp;</p> <p> Jordan&rsquo;s appointment to the PVCA is indicative of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s tradition of fostering and funding unique and innovative startups created by its students and alumni.&nbsp; Since 2013, CMU has launched 36 unique startups and more than 130 companies over the last 5 years, ranking first among U.S. universities without a medical school in the number of startup companies created per research dollar spent since 2007. In addition, CMU spinoffs represent more than a third of the total companies created in Pennsylvania based on university technologies during the past five years.</p> <p> &ldquo;Innovation and entrepreneurship are two things that I, as well as the rest of Carnegie Mellon University, work towards fostering in our students and alumni,&rdquo; said Jordan.</p> <p> &ldquo;With the experience I have at my disposal, it&rsquo;s important to be available to students in order to help them leverage a better future as the entrepreneurial leaders of tomorrow.&rdquo;</p> <p> As the Senior Director of the Healthcare Policy and Management program, Jordan oversees one of the nation&rsquo;s top-ranked (US News &amp; World Report) health programs, which offers concentrations in economics and policy, IT and operations, and management and organization.</p> <p> The MSHCPM program differentiates itself from schools of public health and healthcare administration by providing the highly marketable and transferable skills that employers demand. Heinz College graduates can be found working in leadership roles for organizations such as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, MITRE, Cleveland Clinic, Ernst and Young, Aspen Advisors, FTI Consulting, Highmark, Johnson and Johnson, Partners Healthcare, SDLC Partners and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC).</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=163" target="_blank">More info about James Jordan &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=213" target="">More info about the MSHCPM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1744Mon, 23 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4342photo

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Takeaways from China, the West, and the Alternative Energy Innovation Challengehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1742]]><p> On June 27<sup>th</sup>, 2014, the Peterson Institute for International Economics convened a panel of economic policy leaders on the global challenge of changing climate.&nbsp; The panel, which included <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=11" target="_blank">Lee Branstetter</a> (Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College), <a href="http://www.epp.cmu.edu/people/bios/morgan.html" target="_blank">M. Granger Morgan</a> (head of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University), and Gilbert E. Metcalf, discussed the technological progress that has been made and the technical challenges that still limit the role of alternative energy in contemporary economies, including recent policy shifts in China, Europe, and the United States that have shaped the pace and trajectory of inventive effort and the impact of current trade disputes on the diffusion of alternative energy technologies.</p> <p> To meet the global challenge of a changing climate, the international community needs both effective promotion of alternative energy innovation and an open trade regime that allows unfettered access to the most cost effective alternative energy solutions from anywhere. Many nations, however, have encountered setbacks in their efforts to promote alternative energy innovation. Simultaneously, serious international trade disputes have arisen in this domain, many involving China, which has emerged as a major producer and exporter of solar and wind power hardware.</p> <p> &nbsp;&ldquo;You could look at that and just say, &lsquo;Oh my lord,&rsquo; give up and go home,&rdquo; said Morgan. &ldquo;The point of showing you this picture is to say that we&rsquo;ve got to get started now. We should have started 20, 30 years ago but if we don&rsquo;t get started the slope of those lines just get steeper and steeper.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got a very serious problem and we need to stop fooling around and get with it, or our children and grandchildren are not going to like the world we leave them.&rdquo;</p> <p> For Branstetter, there were several takeaways from the panel.&nbsp; First, the notion that alternative energy innovation is hard, since innovations will not come quickly or easily.&nbsp; Second, on the importance of advancing technology, Branstetter said, &ldquo;Technology push is not enough &ndash; we need demand pull.&nbsp; The Obama Administration&rsquo;s new carbon rules are a useful start, but much more will be needed to tilt the playing field in favor of low(er) carbon energy.&rdquo;</p> <p> Branstetter&rsquo;s third takeaway suggested that to enhance the competitiveness of alternative energy, we need to maintain open markets for alternative energy hardware.</p> <p> Branstetter, who joined Heinz College in 2006, has a joint appointment with the Department of Social and Decision Sciences, is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves as an associate editor of the Journal of International Economics. From 2011-2012, he served as the Senior Economist for International Trade and Investment for the President&#39;s Council of Economic Advisors. His work has appeared in leading journals including the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the RAND Journal of Economics, and the Journal of International Economics.</p> <p> <br /> Watch the entire panel here:</p> <object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/9TAE2Uiek6A?hl=en_US&amp;version=3"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/9TAE2Uiek6A?hl=en_US&amp;version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1742Mon, 21 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=4339photo

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Ramayya Krishnan Reappointed Dean of Heinz Collegehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1743]]><p> This article originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2014/july/july17_krishnanreappointed.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=51">Ramayya Krishnan</a> (right), the W. W. Cooper and Ruth F. Cooper Professor of Management Science and Information Systems, has been appointed to a second five-year term as dean of Carnegie Mellon University&#39;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx">H. John Heinz III College</a>.<br /> <br /> &quot;The Heinz College has done remarkably well this past five years in its educational and research missions, in its linkages to other parts of campus, its student quality, its success in faculty hiring and its fundraising. This, of course, is a credit to the entire Heinz College community, but the intellectual and managerial leadership of Krishnan has been an essential component,&quot; said Nathan Urban, CMU&#39;s interim provost and the Dr. Frederick A. Schwertz Distinguished Professor of Life Sciences.<br /> <br /> Krishnan began his role as dean on July 1, 2009. He has been a member of the Heinz College faculty since 1988 and is a founding faculty member of the <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx">Master of Information Systems Management Program</a>. &quot;I am honored to be reappointed as dean,&quot; Krishnan said. &quot;Heinz College is an extraordinary institution. It has outstanding faculty and staff, highly motivated students and a dedicated group of alumni. I look forward to working with President Suresh, Interim Provost Urban, the leadership team at the university and the entire Heinz College community.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1743Mon, 18 Jul 2014 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=2729photo

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