Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College Heinz Student Helps Develophttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2792]]><p> <span class="attribution" style="float: right;"><em>This article includes embedded video.</em></span></p> <div> &nbsp;</div> <p> Social innovation and entrepreneurship are elemental features of the interdisciplinary academic experience at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a>. Carnegie Mellon students learn technical and practical skills that place them at the forefront of their respective fields. Then, as developing leaders, they overwhelmingly utilize these skills to help make the world a better place.</p> <p> At CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/institute-for-social-innovation/index.aspx" target="_blank">Institute for Social Innovation (ISI)</a> exists as a resource through which CMU students can use their newly formed skills in areas ranging from policy, management, and health care to data analytics, education, and media to develop cutting-edge tools, ventures, and initiatives for social impact.</p> <p> &ldquo;The ISI is where social entrepreneurs at Carnegie Mellon go to conceive of, develop, incubate, and hopefully launch financially sustainable social ventures,&rdquo; explained Tim Zak, associate teaching professor at Heinz College and Director of the ISI. &ldquo;These are the kinds of ventures that focus on, for example, basic human needs like food, water, and shelter, but also other socially impactful kinds of ventures focused on things like health care and education, as well as community and economic development.&rdquo;</p> <p> To this end, the ISI launched the Social Entrepreneurship in Residence program in 2014, in partnership with CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmucreatelab.org/" target="_blank">Community, Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment Lab (CREATE Lab)</a>. The CREATE Lab is a research endeavor of the <a href="http://www.ri.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Robotics Institute</a> in CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cs.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">School of Computer Science</a>, dedicated to exploring socially meaningful innovation and deployment of robotic technologies.&nbsp; Through this collaboration, the Social Entrepreneurship in Residence program gives a Heinz College student an opportunity to work with CREATE Lab researchers to develop and market programs that can do demonstrable social good.</p> <p> &ldquo;This is the first year that we launched the Social Entrepreneurship in Residence program in partnership with the CREATE Lab,&rdquo; explained Zak. &ldquo;The focus for that individual or individuals is to help the lab look at the kinds of technologies that they&rsquo;re currently incubating or developing, and figure out which of those might be the most viable to either turn into companies or to develop in such a way that they actually could have real-world impact.&rdquo;</p> <p> For the 2014-15 academic year, that individual was Manoj Ravi, a second-year <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/21-month-track/index.aspx" target="_blank">Global Master of Information Systems Management (Global MISM)</a> student. Ravi has been actively involved in projects that merge at the intersection of technology and social outreach since his days as an undergraduate student in Chennai, India. For him, the opportunity to collaborate with the CREATE Lab through the Social Entrepreneurship in Residence program was the perfect way to cap his academic experience at Heinz College.</p> <p> &ldquo;It gives me personal satisfaction to help people in ways they could help themselves, but they may not be doing it either because they could not do it, or they did not know that they could do it,&rdquo; explained Ravi. &ldquo;So I enjoy being the knowledge bridge there between the tools that could help them improve their lives, and the improvement of their lives itself. And I see technology as a great leverage that people could be using in different aspects of their lives. It could be as simple as a line of code in software, or it could be something robotic in its nature which could help their day-to-day activities.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Message from Me 2" src="image.aspx?id=9904" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p> For Ravi&rsquo;s Social Entrepreneurship Residency, that technology came primarily in the form of an iPad app. Ravi helped develop <a href="http://www.messagefromme.org/" target="_blank">&ldquo;Message from Me,&rdquo;</a> an early educational platform for 3- to 5-year-olds that adapts existing technologies so that young children can record their daily experiences at school and send them to their parents. The goal of the program is to enhance parent-child conversations in ways that impact the child&rsquo;s feeling of individuality, self-confidence, and well-being.</p> <p> Message from Me was well into the testing and implementation phase when Ravi became involved with the project, so his primary responsibilities included promoting and marketing Message from Me to prospective users, investors, and distributors.</p> <p> &ldquo;We had been implementing this app in schools in and around Pennsylvania and West Virginia,&rdquo; explained Ravi. &ldquo;So the scope for me within this particular project was trying to find a partner who would like to take up this opportunity as an entrepreneur and run a business out of it.</p> <p> &ldquo;The other aspect for me was to try to scale it up, and to come up with scaling ideas. Because now it is being implemented in parts of two states here, and what would be the plan if you want to scale it across the U.S.?&rdquo;</p> <p> Ravi says that speaking with entrepreneurs across the country, gauging and predicting their interest in the product, and learning how to pitch them in an effective way gave him a real-world application of techniques he learned in the classroom at Heinz College.</p> <p> &ldquo;Being from MISM program, I was doing a mix of both technology and management,&rdquo; said Ravi. &ldquo;So I have been doing courses along the lines of mobile application development, data science, etc. on one side. On the other side, I have been doing courses like financial analysis, accounting, and all of these business aspects of the game as well. So I felt like the Social Entrepreneurship in Residence was an opportunity for me to test my skills that I acquired through the MISM program here at the Heinz College. It was like doing it in the real world, and gaining the real world experience that I could not have gotten from the Heinz College courses alone.&rdquo;</p> <p> As the Social Entrepreneurship in Residence program enters its second year at Carnegie Mellon, the need for technological innovation continues to move into the forefront of creating social change in the face of increasingly nuanced global systems that affect daily life.</p> <p> &ldquo;Increasingly, technology is having at least a supporting, if not a direct, impact on a variety of social needs in the world,&rdquo; explained Zak. &ldquo;So both the ISI and the CREATE Lab are trying to identify the ways that technology can either directly or indirectly support more social cohesion, and a greater ability to fill gaps in societal needs. And the Heinz College, with its emphasis on information technology and the management of technology, combined with a laboratory that is very focused on a variety of technologies including robotics, is a really interesting match.&rdquo;</p> <div class="flash"> <p> <iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" rel="0&amp;showinfo=0&quot;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/P7s4e7EplNE" width="560"></iframe></p> </div> <p> &nbsp;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2792Mon, 27 Aug 2015 10:15:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9903photo

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Heinz MPM Alum Lives Lifelong Dream at Johns Hopkinshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2791]]><p> As a young boy, <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a> alumnus Saad Chaudhry (MPM &lsquo;11) always assumed he would become a physician. The son, grandson, and nephew of several physicians, Saad spent his childhood around clinics and hospitals, traveling to different cities with his parents to attend medical conferences.</p> <p> Then one day, when Saad was in his early teens, his father brought home an old IBM-286 desktop computer and showed him how to run programs on it. Saad quickly became obsessed with computing, convinced it would change every facet of modern life. He went on to put together a more updated PC himself from individual components, in order to set up a documentation and scheduling system at his father&rsquo;s private practice.</p> <p> &ldquo;I knew then exactly what I wanted to do the rest of my life,&rdquo; said Saad of this first foray into health care information systems. &ldquo;And I never looked back.&rdquo;</p> <p> Two decades and three academic degrees later, Saad is living his dream. As Director of Healthcare Data Integration for <a href="http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/" target="_blank">Johns Hopkins Medicine</a>, he oversees systems integration for all the hospitals and facilities across the Johns Hopkins enterprise, ensuring that the systems governing everything from patient admissions, to clinical analysis and diagnosis, to invoicing, all work together seamlessly around the clock.</p> <p> At an organization that administers five hospitals in the Baltimore area alone, totaling more than 2,500 hospital beds with over 115,000 inpatient admissions and 350,000 emergency visits a year, this is no small feat. In addition to these responsibilities, Saad also represents Johns Hopkins&#39; senior leadership on various health care policy boards and committees at both the state and federal levels, dealing with health care policies as they apply to the unique intersection of hospital operations and technology.</p> <p> Before joining the staff at Johns Hopkins in 2014, Saad spent over a decade working with hospitals across the country in various roles &ndash; most notably, as a Technical Project Manager at <a href="http://www.mckesson.com/" target="_blank">McKesson Health Care</a>, a Fortune 500 company. As his career gained traction, Saad began seeking opportunities to learn more about large-scale organizational management and the public policy process.</p> <p> &ldquo;I realized that if I ever wanted to climb the ladder to a Chief Information Officer role, and be effective at it, I needed some background in strategic organizational management and policymaking,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p> Saad soon decided that Heinz College&rsquo;s academic offerings in the health care sector were what he needed to take the next step in his career. From specialized degrees including the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-management-mpm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Public Management (MPM)</a> and the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/healthcare-policy-management-hcpm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Health Care Policy &amp; Management (MHSCPM)</a>, to research centers such as the emerging Center for Health Care Analytics, Heinz College is at the forefront of the health care field as a conduit of knowledge circulating at the intersection of medicine, policy, management, and data analytics. These interdisciplinary skills help our students to thrive in the rapidly evolving health care industry, which will represent more than 20 percent of the U.S. economy by 2020.</p> <p> For Saad, the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-management-mpm/index.aspx" target="_blank">MPM</a> program fit the bill. Designed for emerging managers, administrators, and leaders, the MPM&rsquo;s industry-centered approach leverages the work experience professional students like Saad bring to the classroom, while broadening their understanding of social, political, technological, and economic processes.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Saad Chaudhry" src="image.aspx?id=9894" style="width: 278.6875px; margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p> The program&rsquo;s flexibility allows students to take advantages of opportunities to further their professional development, as Saad himself can attest. Shortly after being admitted to the MPM program, he was offered a position at <a href="http://www.upmc.com/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">UPMC</a>, managing projects that dealt with the Health Plan, followed later by a role on the Physician Services side, overseeing a Clinical Informatics program. Thanks to the flexible scheduling, Saad was able to work for the duration of his time at UPMC pursuing an MPM degree.</p> <div> <p> Now one year into his current role at Johns Hopkins, Saad says he uses the skills he learned in courses such as <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=388" target="_blank">Conflict Resolution</a>, <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=47" target="_blank">Negotiation</a>, <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=116" target="_blank">Financial Management of Health Care</a>, and <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=19" target="_blank">Health Care Management</a>, on a daily basis.</p> <p> &ldquo;Integration is the backbone of any health care organization in this day and age,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;As Director of Data Integration, knowing how government policies are enacted, and how they impact the use of technology at, hence the financial and operational status of, health care organizations, helps me immensely when creating multi-year strategies and goals for our facilities and teams.&rdquo;</p> <p> Saad is the youngest person to hold this position in the history of Johns Hopkins Medicine. But he insists that what may appear to be a meteoric rise to the top is actually the result of years of dedication and hard work, bolstered by the targeted, professionally-oriented education he received at Heinz College through the MPM program.</p> <p> &ldquo;Being the youngest person in a leadership role means nothing if you can&#39;t back it up with performance that justifies your seat at that table,&rdquo; said Saad. &ldquo;All the hard work in the world won&#39;t get you to a point where you no longer have to prove your worth.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-management-mpm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Read more about the MPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/healthcare-policy-management-hcpm/index.aspx" target="_blank">Read more about the MSHCPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> </div> <p> &nbsp;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2791Mon, 19 Aug 2015 14:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9893photo

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Ticketing Software Survey Surprises with Mobile Data Findingshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2790]]><p> The <a href="http://amt-lab.org/" target="_blank">Arts Management and Technology Laboratory</a> (AMT Lab), a research center of <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s</a> H. John Heinz College, recently released the <a href="http://static1.squarespace.com/static/51d98be2e4b05a25fc200cbc/t/55d4b3fae4b07ad2f825a3a0/1440003066744/Surveydoc.pdf" target="_blank">2015 Ticketing Software Survey Report</a>.</p> <p> The research that populated the report expanded from two previous studies conducted in 2009 and 2011, respectively, by AMT Lab&rsquo;s predecessor, the Center for Arts Management and Technology (CAMT). The goal of the 2015 survey and its resulting report was to better understand user behaviors and opinions regarding their respective ticketing systems and features, and it focused primarily on respondents from nonprofit arts organizations.</p> <p> Brett Crawford, Executive Director of AMT Lab and Assistant Teaching Professor of Arts Management at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a>, explained, &ldquo;We tweaked the previous survey so that it was much more focused towards the user, the user&rsquo;s experience, and the user&rsquo;s needs. The report is still a useful tool for vendors, because it presents feedback from a user&rsquo;s perspective. But the survey was really designed to understand the user&rsquo;s experience with the software and where it is now.&rdquo;</p> <p> More than 1,000 individuals at institutions across the U.S. and Canada took the survey, including IT professionals, software developers, vendors, box office managers, and directors of development.</p> <p> &ldquo;We were very happy with the diversity of the response rate,&rdquo; said Crawford. &ldquo;We had a reasonable sampling from every quadrant of the country in that sense, and we were also very happy with the response rate across budget tiers.&rdquo;</p> <p> Overall, researchers were pleased to find the ticketing software industry has matured to a point where the vast majority of arts and culture institutions seemed satisfied with the features in their respective systems.</p> <p> &ldquo;I know that the ticketing software over the last 20 years has made a significant changes, so I was really encouraged with the fact that most people were satisfied on the whole,&rdquo; said Crawford. &ldquo;Because in 2002 or 1995, people weren&rsquo;t satisfied, which is why one or two large companies ended up really owning a huge segment of the market in the cultural sector. Now, there are enough vendors and direct solutions for Customer Relationship Management systems that include tickets and donations, so a lot of previous problems have been solved. And a lot of vendors are moving towards systems dedicated to serving the cultural sector.&quot;</p> <p> One of the surprising findings for the research team concerned the use of mobile devices to purchase tickets to cultural events and activities. A new section queried the availability and uses of mobile ticketing, with the discovery that only 7.2 percent of ticket transactions occur on mobile devices, even though a majority of organizations have a mobile ticketing or mobile app available.</p> <p> &ldquo;Sixty-four percent of the United States population has a smartphone, and I would also bet that if you actually look at the arts market alone, more than 64 percent of patrons have a smartphone,&rdquo; explained Crawford. &ldquo;Most arts organizations are working on their website and tech systems so that people can really engage in their materials through a mobile device from a marketing perspective. And when you&rsquo;re marketing, the point of the marketing is engagement, and hopefully a transaction.</p> <p> &ldquo;So the fact that at least 64 percent have a smartphone and at the end of the day, only a little more than seven percent are actually purchasing &ndash; it just seems like it&rsquo;s a little bit out of wack. And that&rsquo;s a question that I&rsquo;d love to learn the answer to moving forward through additional research: why are people not actually transacting through their smartphone?&rdquo;</p> <p> The research team included graduate students and faculty members from Heinz College, and the students completed either the <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=485" target="_blank">Survey Design</a> or <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=486" target="_blank">Analysis of Survey Data</a> courses at Heinz College while testing, analyzing, and reporting on the survey and its results.</p> <p> &ldquo;The students had an opportunity to see a survey that was designed and then actually analyze the data, rather than just do a top line data presentation,&rdquo; said Crawford. &ldquo;They did several cross-tabs and looked from different perspectives. So I think this project really gave them a chance to dive into data in a way that they wouldn&rsquo;t typically get through a seven-week Survey Analysis course alone.&rdquo;</p> <p> The final report is broken down into seven sections, with analysis providing views across geographical, budget, and discipline differences. The document concludes with a brief outline of what an institution should consider when buying or changing systems, as well as a full appendix of the questions and raw data.</p> <p> The full report is available for <a href="http://static1.squarespace.com/static/51d98be2e4b05a25fc200cbc/t/55d4b3fae4b07ad2f825a3a0/1440003066744/Surveydoc.pdf" target="_blank">free viewing</a> on the AMT Lab website.</p> <p> <a href="http://amt-lab.org/" target="_blank">Learn more about AMT Lab &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/arts-management-mam/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the Master of Arts Management program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2790Mon, 18 Aug 2015 10:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9891photo

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Who Gains? Jobs from the Redevelopment of the Almono Site in Hazelwoodhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1747]]><p> In 2002, four southwestern Pennsylvania foundations formed a limited partnership with RIDC, a non-profit private development organization as general partner, and purchased the 178 acre LTV Steel Hazelwood site. &nbsp;The partnership was convinced that this remarkable riverfront plateau offered a rare opportunity to set a new standard for urban riverfront property development. The name <a href="http://almono.org/">Almono</a> came from the three Pittsburgh rivers - the <strong>Al</strong>legheny, <strong>Mon</strong>ongahela, and the <strong>O</strong>hio.</p> <p> The Almono Partners envision a master-planned development, maximizing local and regional impact, as well as employing development and economic &quot;Best Practices&quot; from across the globe. &nbsp;Almono&#39;s focus on the long-term sustainability of the project is paramount to the planning effort. &nbsp;Environmental sustainability, including alternate sources of energy, storm and waste water management and transportation innovation are key components of the plan. &nbsp;The ownership&#39;s ability to be patient in terms of financial return, supports the Partnerships&#39; goal of avoiding piecemeal, uncoordinated, or disconnected development.</p> <p> Across the street from the Almono site sits Hazelwood. Hazelwood consists of four ethnically and culturally diverse neighborhoods: Hazelwood, Glenwood, Glen Hazel, and Riverside, or &ldquo;Below the Tracks.&rdquo; Hazelwood has never recovered from the closing of the mill facilities at Almono.&nbsp; The community has lost much of its population base, most of its business district and much of its sense of community.</p> <p> Working for <a href="http://www.ura.org/business_owners/powerup_pittsburgh.php">Power Up Pittsburgh</a> (a joint initiative of the Mayor&rsquo;s Office, CMU, Pitt, the URA and several other EDOs), a team of Heinz students took a hard look at both the potential economic impact of the plans for the site, and the extent to which the residents of these communities might benefit in terms of employment and proprietorship opportunities.&nbsp; They found a project with enormous economic potential which if realized would be a huge win for the City.&nbsp; They also found that without intentional planning and support by the Almono partnership and local government, little guaranteed that the residents of the Hazelwood would see jobs.</p> <p> The team began by generating and characterizing employment impacts from the development and operation of the site.&nbsp; Construction jobs were calculated from the planned square feet of land use (commercial/office, residential, industrial), the estimated construction cost per square foot, and estimates of construction &ldquo;job years&rdquo; via input-output analysis.&nbsp;</p> <p> The team then estimated aggregate on site employment using typical job density ratios for commercial, industrial or office space.&nbsp; As the tenants that will occupy the site is not yet known, the team consulted projected employment growth by industry from the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, and identified a plausible set of industries that might be attracted to the Almono development site given projected trends and targeted industries.&nbsp;</p> <p> National industry-occupation matrices were then used to estimate what types (occupations) and number of positions these industries might generate.&nbsp; Occupations were then compared based on wages and educational requirements based on information from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics and Pennsylvania&rsquo;s Center for Workforce Information and Analysis.</p> <p> In terms of overall impact, the team found that the direct employment impact of a large development project would indeed be large.&nbsp; Based on their assumptions the twenty year build out would result in over 3,200 construction job years, and that once fully developed, the site would support over 3,800 direct jobs on site.&nbsp;</p> <p> The team also identified three other sources of increased economic activity from Almono that nearby communities might be able to tap, all of which were found to have large potential impacts.</p> <p> One source was expected &ldquo;first tier&rdquo; supplier-spending from firms on site.&nbsp; Spending was estimated by generating an estimate of sales based on projected employment levels, and using industry supplier spending patterns from input-output tables to generate supply purchase by industry.&nbsp; Based on their assumed scenario for Almono, the team found that the firms of Almono could require up to $8.2M in purchases in service and retail sectors that could plausibly locate or be located in the area (print shops, business support services, restaurants, etc.).&nbsp;</p> <p> A second source was ancillary spending of the 3,800 on site workers.&nbsp; Based on rough estimates of weekly worker spending, they calculated workers could bring up to $19M in additional annual spending to the Hazelwood area per year.&nbsp;</p> <p> Finally, the current vision plan for the development also calls for almost 1,400 additional housing units to be built on the Almono site, which could represent an increase in household spending.&nbsp; Since the extent to which these units will include affordable housing remains uncertain, the team constructed three scenarios for tenant mix.&nbsp; They then used ESRI Business Analyst&rsquo;s Tapestry geodemographic system to simulate spending patterns by lifestyle segment and patterns, and found that if were built and occupied, total residential spending power in the area could rise from $31M up to $80M.</p> <p> These increases in spending represent clear opportunities to bring back the business district in Hazelwood.&nbsp; But which types of retail would be most promising?&nbsp; To account for local competition, the team also conducted a gap analysis using Business Analyst, and found that even when competing shopping centers in the area were included, thirteen to twenty five categories of retail demand would not be met by the current retail landscape around Almono after the build out.&nbsp;</p> <p> The team then used ESRI&rsquo;s ArcView to develop a gravity model to estimate the proportion of demand that a grocery store in Hazlewood might capture from nearby competitors if one re-opened in Hazelwood (the area is currently effectively a food desert).</p> <p> The team also found that their estimates of employment and proprietorship opportunities are subject to great uncertainties.&nbsp; &nbsp;These include the extent to which the build out materializes, and the specific employment needs of the industries and firms attracted.&nbsp; But if Almono is built and occupied as planned, projections indicate the employment footprint will be large regardless of what kinds of industries locate there.&nbsp; Whether current local residents will be able to successfully capture the employment opportunities that result from this economic boom is another matter.</p> <p> For example, the team found that the national occupational structure for some of the industries that might land in Almono implied that a significant number of good paying, attainable entry level jobs could be generated by Almono.&nbsp; However, these numbers were based on &ldquo;average&rdquo; national occupational structures for the proposed industries, and for any specific firm, the number of accessible jobs might vary from near zero to many.&nbsp; To cite an extreme local case as an example, while Google&rsquo;s addition was undoubtedly a huge boon for the Bakery Square redevelopment and the ongoing wave of development in the East Liberty area, the firm does not employ significant numbers of residents (if any) from the neighborhood of Larimer.</p> <p> But if they do arrive, &ldquo;accessible&rdquo; employment opportunities at via Almono will still be open to the labor market.&nbsp; That means that local residents will still have to compete with job seekers near and far for plausibly attainable positions, even as would-be entrepreneurs in the community (whether experienced or green) will also have to compete with regional entrepreneurs and perhaps even national chains for the Almono retail and business services dollar.</p> <p> Given that market competition may limit the number of opportunities residents can seize, to what extent does public policy encourage &ldquo;some&rdquo; local employment near brownfield sites?&nbsp; To answer this question a literature review and interviews with personnel from the EPA, DCED, and other practitioner and academic SMEs was conducted. In the end they found that federal, state, and local policies and programs that foster industrial brownfield development do relatively little to ensure local employment.&nbsp; Even the local <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/news/2013/01/10/ura-board-votes-pursue-tif-plan-for.html?page=all">TIF</a> enacted by the City of Pittsburgh to move the Almono plan forward, for example, contained no specific provisions for the employment of Hazelwood residents.&nbsp; That said the team also found that current policies do not forbid tools that could help, such as Community Benefit Agreements, if project stakeholders are willing to support them.</p> <p> Because of the Bakery Square case, the team was charged with taking a hard look at sole proprietorship opportunities as an avenue of employment for local residents.&nbsp; While it is clear that opportunities could emerge, it is less clear that supports are in place to help new, inexperienced entrepreneurs in the neighborhood to seize them.&nbsp; A literature review and set of interviews with a half dozen small business development programs in the region suggested that relatively little emphasis or specific programming was available or targeted at low income white or African American proprietors, with one exception: <a href="http://www.bridgewaycapital.org/">Bridgeway Capital</a>.</p> <p> The team&rsquo;s findings imply that if and as Almono succeeds, more will need to be done to see that local residents have a chance of connecting with the opportunities that arise.</p> <p> Special thanks to Power Up Pittsburgh for serving as the client for this project.&nbsp;&nbsp; Thanks also to the team&rsquo;s advisory board members from RIDC, the Hazelwood Initiative, the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, Action Housing, Western Pennsylvania&rsquo;s Brownfields Center, World Class Industrial Networks, Bridgeway Capital, and the Office of (then) Councilman Bill Peduto.&nbsp;</p> <p> Members of the student team included Ahsan Ahmad, Zachary Best, Peter Brewton, Aneeq Cheema, Pat Gibson, Ethan Hayes, Stephanie Lagos, and Jamie Passinault.&nbsp; Greg Lagana of the Heinz College&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/ced">Center for Economic Development</a> served as faculty advisor.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1747Mon, 01 Aug 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=3050photo

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Energetic Leader Joseph Hezirhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2789]]><p> <em>This article originally appeared on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/july/energetic-leader.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> As chief financial officer for the U.S. Department of Energy, Joseph Hezir (E 1972, HNZ 1974) oversees a complex $29 billion budget.</p> <p> He credits his Carnegie Mellon University degrees in chemical engineering and public policy as helping him become the leader he is today.</p> <p> &quot;In the course of my career, I&#39;ve had the opportunity to work with many people coming out of other institutions. The quality of the education I received at Carnegie Mellon was unmatched from anyone else I&#39;ve ever worked with,&quot; Hezir said. &quot;I probably couldn&#39;t do what I do without the benefit of both degrees.&quot;</p> <p> Hezir was confirmed to his post by the Senate on Dec. 4, 2014.</p> <p> &quot;Joe&#39;s experience in the energy, environmental and budgetary realms and his strategic approach to challenges make him a great fit as chief financial officer for the agency,&quot; said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz when the appointment was announced.</p> <p> Hezir is working to assure the effective management and financial integrity of the department. He helps implement and monitor department-wide policies and systems in the areas of budget administration, program analysis and evaluation, finance and accounting, internal controls, corporate financial systems, and strategic planning.</p> <p> In addition to Hezir, another member of the 1974 Heinz program is also with the department. Cynthia Wilson (DC 1973, HNZ 1974), a senior policy advisor, has known Hezir for more than 40 years. The 18 students who graduated together continue to stay in touch.</p> <p> &quot;The group deeply bonded together over our two-year program,&quot; Wilson said. The most recent gathering was last November in Pittsburgh. &quot;Joe was always the quietest of all of us and the deepest thinker.&quot;</p> <p> Prior to joining the department, Hezir worked as a research engineer and executive director of The Future of Solar Energy Study and a member of the Future of Natural Gas study team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology&#39;s Energy Initiative.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Joseph Hezir" src="image.aspx?id=9875" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />He was the vice president and managing partner of EOP Group, Inc. and executive vice president of EOP Education, LLC and EOP Foundation, Inc. Hezir also held various roles at the Office of Management and Budget, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, the President&#39;s Reorganization Project, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and was an adviser to a number of public policy and public service organizations.</p> <p> Hezir credits Ed Rubin, the&nbsp;Alumni Chair Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science&nbsp;and a&nbsp;professor of Engineering and Public Policy, Mechanical Engineering&nbsp;for being instrumental in steering him to a career of public service.</p> <p> &quot;Joe attended CMU during my early years on the faculty, but I still remember him as a serious and bright student, interested not only in the technical dimensions of engineering, but in societal and policy aspects as well,&quot; Rubin said.</p> <p> When Rubin was working on a National Academies&#39; energy study, he learned that Hezir was the highly respected overseer of the Department of Energy&#39;s budget line at the federal Office of Management &amp; Budget.</p> <p> &quot;That re-established our connection. He later moved to a D.C. consulting firm, where I called on him for advice in formulating a legislative proposal related to climate change,&quot; Rubin said. &quot;His new position at DOE puts him at the top of his game. I can&#39;t imagine anyone better qualified.&quot;</p> <p> Hezir said the analytical underpinning of CMU&#39;s education is important in pursuing a career in policy.</p> <p> &quot;Policy is often equated to politics, but policy is an increasingly complex field and analytical insights are a critical skill in addressing those issues,&quot; Hezir said.</p> <p> Wilson said that her friends and former classmates have taken those analytical tools they learned in school and transferred them to fields such as health care, finance and real estate. &quot;The strength of Heinz is that we were taught skills not topics,&quot; she said.</p> <p> Rubin echoed that sentiment.</p> <p> &quot;Many of our most pressing and challenging public policy issues are deeply rooted in technology &mdash; think about energy systems, telecommunications or climate change,&quot; he said. &quot;At CMU, we&#39;ve succeeded as no other university has in training students who can work effectively at the interface between technology and policy. Joe does us proud.&quot;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2789Mon, 23 Jul 2015 08:55:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9871photo

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Heinz Faculty Members Honoredhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2788]]><p> With the widespread global proliferation of Internet use and the rapid development of mobile technology over the last two decades, companies like Google, Adobe, and LinkedIn have consistently committed to developing new technologies to help users find and utilize information that will more closely connect individuals and have a positive impact on society as a whole.</p> <p> This commitment has led to a desire on the part of these organizations to maintain strong ties with academic institutions worldwide that pursue innovative research in core areas relevant to their mission of the pursuit of information.</p> <p> So it&rsquo;s no surprise that all three of these companies recently chose to support research that is currently being conducted by <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=104" target="_blank">Rahul Telang</a> and <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/faculty-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=476" target="_blank">Beibei Li</a>, faculty members at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s</a> H. John Heinz III College.</p> <p> Telang, professor of Information Systems and Ph.D. Program Chair at Heinz College, and <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/directories/doctoral-students/doctoral-student-details/index.aspx?faculty_id=564" target="_blank">Abhinav Maurya</a>, a Heinz College Ph.D. student in Information Systems, are developing ways in which individuals in the workforce can harness data available on LinkedIn to acquire additional skills that are complementary to their current skill sets and obtain upward mobility in their careers.</p> <p> This caught the eye of the social media giant, which recently named Maurya and Telang&rsquo;s proposal <em>Your Next Big Move: Personalized Data-Driven Career-Making</em> one of 11 winners of the 2015 <a href="http://economicgraphchallenge.linkedin.com/" target="_blank">LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge</a>.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="LinkedIn Presentation" src="image.aspx?id=9869" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />LinkedIn launched the Economic Graph Challenge to encourage researchers, academics, and data-driven thinkers to propose how they would use data from LinkedIn to generate insights that may ultimately lead to new economic opportunities.</p> <p> Maurya and Telang&rsquo;s proposal focuses on utilizing <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/linkedin-economic-graph?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1396903016899%2Ctas%3Aeconomic+graph%2Cidx%3A1-1-1" target="_blank">Economic Graph</a> data to help individuals make good decisions in acquiring additional skills based on their previous expertise and current skill gaps.</p> <p> &ldquo;LinkedIn has a treasure trove of big data on labor economics &ndash; what skills people possess, what schools they have attended, and what positions they have held, and what jobs are currently available,&rdquo; said Maurya. &ldquo;The missing link is that in order for people to become eligible for better jobs, sometimes they need to acquire additional skills they may be lacking. A recent survey from <a href="http://www.manpowergroup.com/wps/wcm/connect/manpowergroup-en/home/#.Vae5MhNVhBc" target="_blank">ManpowerGroup</a> found that 40 percent of people in the workforce lack skills for the jobs they aspire to.</p> <p> &ldquo;Many employees in the workforce are dissatisfied with their jobs despite being good at what they do, due to a lack of engaging challenges in their day-to-day work. If we can identify skills that would make them desirable for more challenging careers in a data-driven yet explanatory fashion, it could help millions of people lead more productive professional careers. So our proposal basically addressed that: how do we recommend a new skill to be acquired by a person so that he becomes eligible for a more satisfying and more challenging job?&rdquo;</p> <p> One of the elements that sets the <em>Your Next Big Move</em> proposal apart from others in the Economic Graph Challenge that also deal with the skills gap is that it applies an economic perspective to an economic problem.</p> <p> &ldquo;In our proposal, we are saying that if a person has certain skills, it might be more cost-effective for him to acquire a particular skill &lsquo;x&rsquo; rather than some other random skill,&rdquo; explained Maurya. &ldquo;So the utility of acquiring a new skill largely depends on the context of a person&rsquo;s background in terms of skills and education, and the demand for that new skill in the labor market.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;The project can be thought of as bridging the information gap,&rdquo; added Telang. &ldquo;We are all trying to maximize our outcomes, but sometimes we just don&rsquo;t have enough information, and acquiring it can be very costly for us. LinkedIn has all of this information, so our project on a very simple level is to harness that information and give it to the user so that they can make a better decision.&rdquo;</p> <p> In addition to receiving a $25,000 research grant from LinkedIn, Maurya and Telang will have the opportunity to work with valuable professional data under the supervision and guidance of a LinkedIn employee mentor, before presenting their findings to LinkedIn executives in December. Telang says that he hopes the project will open doors for future collaborations with LinkedIn.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Beibei Li portrait" src="image.aspx?id=9868" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: right;" /></p> <p> While Maurya and Telang are developing ways that individuals in the workforce can harness the big data available on LinkedIn to obtain additional skills, Beibei Li&rsquo;s research focuses on how businesses can best utilize mobile advertising.</p> <p> Li, assistant professor of Information Systems and Management at Heinz College, was named a recipient of both the Google Research Award and the Adobe Digital Marketing Research Award for her research project <em>C</em><em>ombining Machine Learning with Randomized Field Experiments to Improve Mobile Advertising</em>.</p> <p> Each year, Google presents the <a href="http://research.google.com/university/relations/research_awards.html" target="_blank">Google Research Award</a> with the goal of supporting cutting-edge research in computer science, engineering, and related fields like mobile technologies, information retrieval, and human-computer interaction.</p> <p> Adobe funds its annual <a href="http://www.adobe.com/careers/college.html" target="_blank">Digital Marketing Research Award program</a> to promote the understanding and use of data science in the area of marketing, with the goal of encouraging both theoretical and empirical development of solutions to problems in marketing.</p> <p> Li&rsquo;s research on smartphone usage and social media made her the ideal recipient of both awards.</p> <p> &ldquo;Smartphone usage is expected to exceed 2.03 billion users worldwide by the end of 2015,&rdquo; said Li. &ldquo;The proliferation of mobile technologies has contributed to the rise of mobile location-based advertising, which led to my proposal, which is closely in line with the strong interests of both Google and Adobe in this space.&rdquo;</p> <p> Li&rsquo;s proposal looks to combine individual users&rsquo; online social media and social network information together with their offline mobility trajectory information to better understand individual behavior and preferences. This large-scale and fine-grained data from mobile and sensor technologies can help platforms like Google and Adobe to design better mobile recommendation strategies to improve the overall user digital experiences and business marketing strategies.</p> <p> &ldquo;The proliferation of mobile technologies makes it possible for mobile advertisers to leap beyond the real-time snapshot of the static location and context information about consumers,&rdquo; said Li. &ldquo;In our research, we propose a new mobile recommendation strategy that is able to link user social and individual behavioral trajectories via both online and offline channels. It not only extracts user preferences from a large variety of online social networks, but also leverages full information on users&rsquo; physical trajectories.</p> <p> &ldquo;Furthermore, consumers have demonstrated increasing responsiveness to mobile advertising. But without accurate measurement, it&rsquo;s difficult&nbsp;for marketers to shift significant budget to follow them.&rdquo;</p> <p> Li explains that, as mobile marketing goes mainstream, it is extremely critical for offline retailers to effectively measure the impact of their campaigns. To examine the effectiveness of her new mobile social-trajectory-based advertising strategy, Li plans to conduct a large-scale randomized field experiment in a large shopping mall.</p> <p> &ldquo;We have already successfully set up our collaboration with one of the largest retailers in the world and started preliminary pilot studies in summer 2014,&rdquo; said Li. &ldquo;Our social-trajectory-based mobile recommendation will allow businesses today to leverage both online and offline, and both social and individual granular information about every facet of the customers to infer their preferences.</p> <p> &ldquo;Moreover, our results from the large-scale randomized field experiments will allow us to effectively measure the causal impact of mobile campaigns for businesses. Our study has potential to improve customer analytics for mobile applications and wearable devices, such as Google Glass.</p> <p> &ldquo;It can also provide insights on quantifying and improving the impacts of Google and Adobe on mobile advertising.&rdquo;</p> <p> Telang says that the interdisciplinary nature of both projects, which combine an economic framework with machine learning research, exemplifies the type of collaborative learning that routinely takes place at <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">Heinz College</a>.</p> <p> &ldquo;I think these are perfect examples of the kind of interdisciplinary research we tackle at our school, which is combining technology with socioeconomic policy to make society and individuals better,&rdquo; said Telang. &ldquo;If you don&rsquo;t have the technical skills, you can&rsquo;t attack these problems at scale. If you don&rsquo;t have a good socioeconomic framework, you might not be able to think through and frame the problems in the way that we are trying to frame them.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/doctoral-program/phd-ism/index.aspx" target="_blank">More information about the Ph.D. program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://economicgraphchallenge.linkedin.com/" target="_blank">More information about the LinkedIn Economic Graph Challenge &gt;&gt;</a><br /> <br /> <a href="http://research.google.com/university/relations/research_awards.html" target="_blank">More information about the Google Research Award &gt;&gt;</a><br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.adobe.com/careers/college.html" target="_blank">More information about the Adobe Digital Marketing Research Award &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2788Mon, 16 Jul 2015 09:39:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9867photo

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MSIT Students Gather at CMU for Leadership Training Eventshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2787]]><p> At Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, leadership training and experiential learning opportunities are core practical components of all academic programs. Heinz students learn behavioral and problem-solving skills that enable them to succeed as leaders who make positive changes and influence individuals around them to achieve goals.</p> <p> But for <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-technology-msit/index.aspx" target="_blank">Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT)</a> students, who enjoy the flexibility of earning a CMU degree on a part-time basis through evening and online classes while simultaneously advancing in their full-time careers, finding the time to interact with their fellow students and participate in valuable leadership practicums can be a challenge.</p> <p> &ldquo;Leadership training is an important element of the MSIT program, which strives to prepare our students to take the next step in their careers, often at the organizations and businesses where they currently work,&rdquo; explained Allison Frankoski, MSIT Program Director. &ldquo;As Heinz and CMU students, we also want them to feel connected to campus no matter where they live, work and study.&rdquo;</p> <p> To help strengthen that connection, the MSIT program recently offered a series of practical learning seminars on the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> campus for its part-time students and alumni. These gatherings gave participants a sense of daily campus life at CMU, as well as important opportunities to improve their leadership and networking skills.</p> <p> In March, several MSIT distance students traveled from Mexico, Arizona, California, Florida, and New Jersey to join Pittsburgh campus students in an International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise (ISCNE), hosted by Heinz College and the U.S. Army War College&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.csl.army.mil/" target="_blank">Center for Strategic Leadership and Development</a>.</p> <p> For the exercise, students split into teams representing different countries currently involved in a real-world conflict over claims within the South China Sea. The visiting instructors from the U.S. Army War College taught the students the different protocols and communication systems involved in contemporary international crisis negotiations. The students were then tasked with applying these protocols in a mock negotiation setting, staying true to the cultural perspectives of their respective countries and defending their positions, but ultimately making efforts to bring about a peaceful settlement.</p> <p> This two-day experiential learning simulation not only increased their understanding of international conflicts and negotiation processes, but also improved their effectiveness as a team leaders, team members, and negotiators.</p> <p> &ldquo;I enjoyed it, and what I learned is the&nbsp;difficulty&nbsp;of having multi-day, multi-session, multi-party negotiations,&rdquo; said Mauricio Juanes Laviada, a current MSIT student. &ldquo;Information gets fragmented, and it takes a long time before you can get the complete picture.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;It was also good to get practice on negotiations within the group, when we all got&nbsp;together&nbsp;to discuss what to do next. That is more likely to happen in a work day, and it&rsquo;s&nbsp;useful&nbsp;to have practice and be ready for when it&rsquo;s needed.&rdquo;</p> <p> Last month, nearly 30 MSIT students and alumni met on Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s campus for the 2015 Summer Leadership Symposium, a component of Heinz College&rsquo;s Leadership Training Initiative.</p> <p> &ldquo;We host the annual summer leadership symposium specifically for MSIT students and alumni to meet up in Pittsburgh,&rdquo; said Frankoski. &ldquo;They get to learn from the expert faculty and industry leaders located here, develop their professional network, and strengthen the CMU community beyond our campus borders.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I am starting my own company, so the symposium was really helpful,&rdquo; said Juanes Laviada, who also attended this event. &ldquo;Part of my&nbsp;business&nbsp;plan will be providing IT and software development services to&nbsp;Bepensa&nbsp;and&nbsp;similar&nbsp;companies.&nbsp; Being able to negotiate the&nbsp;right&nbsp;terms will be key to the&nbsp;success&nbsp;of the company.&rdquo;</p> <p> Frankoski says that the practical learning seminars help create a sense of community among students and alumni within the MSIT program, many of whom did their studies through distance learning, and she looks forward to meeting more of them at CMU&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/ceilidh/" target="_blank">C&egrave;ilidh Weekend</a> in October.</p> <p> &ldquo;Providing special events like the ISCNE and Leadership Symposium, as well as some travel subsidy to get here, gives MSIT distance students a chance to enjoy some of the opportunities and resources that are available to campus students every day,&rdquo; said Frankoski.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-technology-msit/index.aspx" target="_blank">Read more about the MSIT program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2787Mon, 10 Jul 2015 14:15:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9863photo

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Dean Ramayya Krishnan Moderates CMU Integrated Intelligence Showcase on Smart Citieshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2783]]><p> Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx" target="_blank">H. John Heinz III College</a>, moderated the Smart Cities Panel at Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/integrated-intelligence/" target="_blank">Integrated Intelligence</a> Showcase on July 4 at the Taj Palace in New Delhi, India.</p> <p> The showcase, which featured <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon</a> President Subra Suresh, focused on how CMU is creating and leveraging technology to improve the human condition. The daylong event for alumni, parents, students, and friends of the university included networking opportunities and panel discussions on &ldquo;Smart Cities&rdquo; and the &ldquo;Transformative Impact of Big Data.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Since its founding in 1968, Heinz College has been at the forefront of working closely with cities to implement innovative integrated intelligence solutions with the goal of helping civic systems work more efficiently,&rdquo; said Dean Krishnan. &ldquo;The symposium was a wonderful opportunity to showcase all that Carnegie Mellon and the Heinz College are doing in partnership with cities to create and implement cutting-edge solutions to public policy challenges, ultimately improving the lives of individuals living in metro centers in the process.&rdquo;</p> <p> <em><a href="http://www.ices.cmu.edu/metro21/" target="_blank">Metro21</a> </em>is a university-wide, multi-disciplinary research and educational initiative, incubated in the Heinz College and the College of Engineering, with the goal of designing, developing, deploying, and evaluating solutions to the challenges affecting the economy and quality of life in metro areas. In less than a year, researchers supported by <em>Metro21</em> have worked with Carnegie Mellon&rsquo;s &ldquo;home metro&rdquo; of Pittsburgh on projects ranging from the implementation of a smartphone-based road inspection system to help repair potholes, to developing predictive analytics software to help city officials respond proactively and effectively to &ldquo;311&rdquo; non-emergency request calls.</p> <p> &ldquo;Krishnan&rsquo;s role has really been as an instigator and as a leader working with other deans to design and launch <em>Metro21</em>,&rdquo; said Rick Stafford, <em>Metro21</em> Director and Distinguished Service Professor of Public Policy at Heinz College. &ldquo;Right from the beginning, he was firm in his belief that an interdisciplinary approach is required to solve complex societal problems. Without his visionary leadership and hands-on approach to the research and implementation of these systems, <em>Metro21</em> would not exist as it does today.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Smart Cities Panel" src="image.aspx?id=9860" style="width: 301.796875px; margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p> In addition to Dean Krishnan&rsquo;s involvement as moderator, Sumit D. Chowdhury (MS CIT &rsquo;97, Ph.D. HNZ &rsquo;98), a Heinz College alumnus and founder of <a href="http://gaiasmartcities.com/" target="_blank">Gaia Smart Cities</a>, served as a panelist during the &ldquo;Smart Cities&rdquo; panel discussion at the showcase.</p> <p> Gaia Smart Cities is a pioneering company that deploys products and solutions to create interconnected and intelligent cities. Chowdhury shared his expertise in the field of integrated intelligence with current Carnegie Mellon students this summer when he taught &ldquo;Smart City,&rdquo; a new Heinz College course.</p> <p> The <a href="http://heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=597" target="_blank">&ldquo;Smart City&rdquo;</a> course aims to give an overview of the concepts and practices in the development, feasibility, and sustainability of Smart Cities. The course focuses on stages of Smart City development and the design of New Urban Systems for mobility, energy, food, living, and working. Through the course, students explore how the design of these systems can be resilient, scalable, and reconfigurable.</p> <p> &ldquo;The focus of the course is on the technology and information infrastructure requirements for smart cities, and on ways to measure success in these areas,&rdquo; said Chowdhury. &ldquo;We want students to have the opportunity to develop frameworks to identify problems fit for Smart City consideration in view of the local socio-economic challenges, including the funding of such cross-functional projects.&rdquo;&rsquo;</p> <p> As Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India, has made Smart Cities a priority for his administration, Dean Krishnan says the CMU Integrated Intelligence Showcase provided a great networking and professional development opportunity for the more than 1,800 Carnegie Mellon alumni who currently live and work in India.</p> <p> &ldquo;It is important for our alumni in India and around the world to recognize the important role that Smart City research and implementation will play in urban socio-economic development in the coming years and decades,&rdquo; said Dean Krishnan. &ldquo;My hope is that Heinz College faculty and alumni will continue to innovate the field of integrated intelligence and provide leadership in improving the efficiency and livability of cities across the globe for their inhabitants.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.ices.cmu.edu/metro21/" target="_blank">Learn more about Metro 21 &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2783Mon, 09 Jul 2015 10:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9859photo

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Heinz College Students Sharehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2786]]><p> As the technology surrounding the creation and acquisition of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) increasingly becomes more affordable, developers from a wide variety of global industries are consistently formulating creative ways to utilize UAVs to increase efficiency and productivity. From filmmaking, to search and rescue efforts, to scientific research, UAVs have literally changed the way that humans look at the world, enabling users to probe parts of the globe in areas and under conditions that would otherwise prove too dangerous for manned flight.</p> <p> With this in mind, a group of enterprising students in H. John Heinz III College&rsquo;s Master of Information Systems Management - Global Track (<a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/21-month-track/index.aspx" target="_blank">Global MISM)</a> program, which gives students an opportunity to study at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s campus in Adelaide, South Australia in their first year before completing their second year of study at the Pittsburgh campus, developed and pitched a UAV-based system they hope will aid in the cultivation of one of the world&rsquo;s most popular beverages.</p> <p> &ldquo;The agriculture industry is one of the few civilian industries that can really capitalize on the benefits of having autonomous systems,&rdquo; explained James Laney (MISM &lsquo;16). &ldquo;So we did some more research about what&rsquo;s the best crop, and being in Australia, especially South Australia, it&rsquo;s the home of the wine country. It&rsquo;s kind of like the Napa Valley of Australia. And because it&rsquo;s a cash crop and involves very intimate growing practices, we thought it would be the first one that we should target as a customer and as a way to develop our services for agricultural autonomous systems.&rdquo;</p> <p> Immersed in Adelaide&rsquo;s blossoming startup community, Laney and fellow students Constantin Baumgartner and Daniel Del Duca became interested in UAVs in part because of Australian laws that allow for autonomous research.</p> <p> &ldquo;In Australia, the UAV laws allow you to operate a UAV as a service, which is something that you currently can&rsquo;t do in the States,&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;So we tried to come up with any and every excuse to build a business model around UAVs.&rdquo;</p> <p> Through their research group, <a href="http://aerolaboratories.com/" target="_blank">Aero Laboratories</a>, Laney, Baumgartner, and Del Duca utilized big data and input from local Australian viticulturists and growers to create the cloud-based Vegetation Analysis and Data Regression (VADAR) engine. Aggregating farming data that is already regularly collected, such as rainfall, soil moisture, and Global Solar Radiation, VADAR develops mathematical relationships between infield variables and overall crop health. The engine also isolates crop stress and displays the information via a report in an easy-to-use, interactive mobile platform.</p> <p> VADAR&rsquo;s digital platform displaying real-time crop analysis helps growers develop precision management strategies that reduce input costs by saving them time and money.</p> <p> &ldquo;With current technology, a term that gets thrown around is &lsquo;precision agriculture,&rsquo;&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s the ability to take your large farm, segregate it and isolate different areas, and then target the specific areas that may be lagging or experiencing crops stress. Then you can try to fix just those areas versus applying a general treatment to the whole area. So by selecting each part, you&rsquo;re able to reduce input costs like fertilizer and water. Water is very scarce in Australia; it&rsquo;s very dry, so being able to control that better saves farmers a lot of money.&rdquo;</p> <p> The Aero team had its first opportunity to pitch the VADAR product to investors via <a href="http://thebigpitch.com.au/" target="_blank">The Big Pitch</a> competition. Through the competition, investment group <a href="http://www.oxygenventures.com.au/" target="_blank">Oxygen Ventures</a> travels to six major cities in Australia to listen to selected applicants pitch their idea in hopes of securing a seat at The Big Pitch in Melbourne for a potential share of $5 million. Aero Laboratories was one of only 11 startups in Adelaide that were selected to pitch to Oxygen as part of the competition.</p> <p> &ldquo;After interviewing with the people at The Big Pitch we asked them, &lsquo;why did you select us?&rsquo;&rdquo; recalled Laney. &ldquo;And they said, &lsquo;most of our stuff is your run-of-the-mill-type software businesses. And you guys are completely left-field.&rsquo; This is a big area that we&rsquo;re just touching the surface of &ndash; it&rsquo;s just the beginning of it.</p> <p> &ldquo;We pitched it to them and had a nice conversation. It&rsquo;s been a great experience and helped us answer questions that we wouldn&rsquo;t otherwise have been able to answer from a business perspective.&rdquo;</p> <p> Laney says that the financial analysis and management courses he has taken at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University</a> have played a major role in Aero&rsquo;s ability to establish VADAR as a viable business enterprise.</p> <p> &ldquo;A lot of what we&rsquo;ve been doing is taking the concepts that we use to do business analytics, those same types of regression models, and applying them elsewhere,&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve developed a huge costing structure that allowed us to figure out if this a viable business, can we actually operate, what do we need to do this, and that has been extremely helpful. And I&rsquo;m excited to be back at the CMU Pittsburgh campus to take a lot of the elective classes, like machine learning and data analytics, to help refine and develop the product that we&rsquo;re trying to create.&rdquo;</p> <p> Laney is happy with the relationships he&rsquo;s been able to cultivate as a Global MISM student, and he looks forward to working with growers in Pittsburgh and his hometown of Atlanta in continuing to develop the VADAR systems to customize it to the needs of viticulturists in different parts of the world.</p> <p> &ldquo;CMU Australia has a great relationship with the government over there, so we actually informally met with the chief scientist of Australia, told her what we wanted to do, and received feedback from her, which was great,&rdquo; said Laney. &ldquo;Colin Underwood, the director over there, has been great at setting up connections, and they gave us a space to kind of keep our toys there. So the relationships that CMU has access to and are currently developing have been a key part of our success, and they&rsquo;ve been extremely supportive of what we&rsquo;re doing.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Global MISM students have excelled throughout the program&rsquo;s history at utilizing their creativity and intelligence to cultivate successful entrepreneurial ideas during their time at CMU,&rdquo; said Emil Bolongaita, Executive Director of <a href="http://www.australia.cmu.edu/" target="_blank">Carnegie Mellon University Australia</a>. &ldquo;In that spirit, the VADAR team has developed a remarkable engine that can help improve growing practices throughout the world, and has received the attention of national and international investors. I&rsquo;m proud of the work they&rsquo;ve done, and look forward seeing them continue to refine the project as they carry on with their studies at Carnegie Mellon.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/21-month-track/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the Global MISM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2786Mon, 06 Jul 2015 14:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9851photo

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Heinz Project Extendshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2782]]><p> <span class="attribution" style="float:right"><em>This article includes embedded video.</em></span></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> As a legendary baseball club, the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise has five World Series titles and nine National League pennants to its name. But when it came time for the Pirates to find new ways to leverage their social media interactions with their fans, they turned to Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College for innovative solutions.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got almost a million Facebook followers and half-a-million Twitter followers,&rdquo; said Jim Alexander, the Pirates&rsquo; Senior Director of Business Analytics. &ldquo;The challenge is that we&rsquo;re trying to measure the impact that we&rsquo;re having.</p> <p> &ldquo;We thought this was the perfect time for us to use the brainpower that CMU brings.&rdquo;</p> <p> That brainpower came in the form of Heinz College&rsquo;s Measuring Social class, which is an experiential learning opportunity that examines the impact of social media and content. Since interdisciplinary collaboration is one of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s strengths, the class is open to students from all over campus, which leads to a unique blending of knowledge and experience.</p> <p> &ldquo;We have folks who have expertise in security policy and management, public policy and management, information systems and management, as well as business students,&rdquo; said Ari Lightman, Distinguished Service Professor of Digital Media and Marketing at Heinz College, and Measuring Social course instructor. &ldquo;So they all bring a different skill set and a different thought process.</p> <p> &ldquo;Different skill sets are great because you really see a rise in terms of innovation.&rdquo;</p> <p> The project involved finding new ways for the Pirates to better serve the fans with whom they engage on social media. The Measuring Social team developed an algorithm that would help the Pirates organization better determine which variables will lead to more engagement on social media platforms. Increased engagement on social media leads to a direct increase in fan loyalty and revenue.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Heinz Pirates Capstone Team" src="image.aspx?id=8811" style="margin: 10px; float: left; width: 40%;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;We got a better understanding from the fans themselves of what they wanted from the Pirates social media,&rdquo; said Therese M. Joseph, a&nbsp;Master of Arts in Professional Writing student. &ldquo;Being able to have that kind of specific data and share that with the Pirates is invaluable.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I think any time you work in a real-world setting, it prepares you for the future,&rdquo; said Marco Loffreda-Mancinelli, a Master of Science in Information Security Policy and Management student at Heinz. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s what I think is the best part of these kinds of projects.</p> <p> &ldquo;You get to work with people and they see you as peers, not as students.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team credits both the skills they learned and the reputation that comes with the Carnegie Mellon name as key factors in the project&rsquo;s success.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a very data-heavy school,&rdquo; said William St. Martin, a Master of Business Administration student. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going through surveys from thousands of respondents, and the ability to sift through data and then generate insights from it may not have been possible if not for the skills I learned at Carnegie Mellon.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s a wonderful partnership, and they bring credibility to the table immediately,&rdquo; added Alexander. &ldquo;They&rsquo;re great people and great teams to work with.</p> <p> &ldquo;Hopefully we can do it for many years to come.&rdquo;</p> <div class="flash"> <p> <iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SffYlWbwlOY?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" width="560"></iframe></p> </div> <p> <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/creativity/2014/summer/take-me-out-to-a-ballgame.shtml" target="_blank">Related Story: Take Me Out To a Ballgame &gt;&gt;</a><br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/academic-resources/course-results/course-details/index.aspx?cid=410" target="_blank">Learn more about Measuring Social &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2782Mon, 10 Jun 2015 13:47:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=8807photo

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Ostrato and Carnegie Mellon University Team to Advance Cloud Management Technologyhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2785]]><p> STERLING, VA &ndash; Ostrato today announced that it collaborated with a team of students in the Master of Information Systems Management (MISM) program at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Heinz College this spring to enhance cloudSM&rsquo;s billing and reporting capabilities.</p> <p> The explosion of cloud usage has become a cost and management nightmare for thousands of businesses that lack the manpower or expertise to control their cloud costs and usage (or &ldquo;sprawl&rdquo;). This problem is exacerbated by the complexity of billing reports from cloud service providers like Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure, which makes it difficult for companies to track and allocate their spending, let alone manage it.</p> <p> For its capstone project, the Carnegie Mellon team analyzed the bill extraction process for AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine; performed a competitive analysis; and identified and customized billing reports for different classes of cloudSM users, as well as different customer types.</p> <p> &quot;We enlisted the help of our CMU capstone team to help augment our product management,&rdquo; said Dale Wickizer, Ostrato CTO. &ldquo;They were able to combine their own experience in analytics, along with information they gleaned from competitive analysis and research about cloud service provider capabilities/limitations in billing, to synthesize user stories that are going to greatly enhance the cost reporting in our platform.&rdquo;</p> <p> Customers reviewed the user stories that the team completed, and they were pleased with the results. The capstone team then incorporated those stories into the platform, which is currently supporting real-time customer challenges by providing better visibility and control of cost, usage, and billing data.</p> <p> The project team consisted of Amrit Tandon, who served as the scrum master and project manager, Rachita Issar, who led the documentation effort, Chandrasekhar Iyer, the AWS lead, and Sri Keerthi Mady, the Azure team lead.</p> <p> The MISM program focuses on providing students with an integrated study of how technology interacts with business processes, strategy, and policy. As part of this program, students learn from seasoned practitioners, like those at Ostrato, to prepare them to lead enterprises in a fiercely competitive global marketplace. Thus, the team chose to use a real-world agile development process for the project, working in two-week sprints with a daily scrum.</p> <p> Ostrato thanks Jon Nehlsen and the H. John Heinz III College at Carnegie Mellon University, faculty sponsor John Davis, and this great team of students for a job well-done.</p> <p> In addition to cost visibility and management, cloudSM helps enterprises with all facets of controlling the cloud: self-service orchestration across public and private cloud providers, user governance, and enterprise integration to improve workflow and automation.</p> <p> <strong>About Ostrato</strong></p> <p> Ostrato&rsquo;s cloudSM<sup>TM</sup> platform helps companies save time and money managing their complex and fast-growing applications and services in the cloud. cloudSM provides enterprises the visibility and control they need to&nbsp;optimize&nbsp;spend, reduce costs and govern user access across AWS, Azure, VMware, OpenStack and other providers. We do this by providing IT and DevOps with an integrated, self-service platform for provisioning and automating all public, private and hybrid cloud services.&nbsp;In addition, managed service providers (MSPs) can use cloudSM to create new revenue streams, differentiate their offerings and drive down internal costs to meet their customers&rsquo; growing demand for cloud consumption.</p> <p> For more information, visit <a href="http://www.ostrato.com/?utm_expid=75457977-4.3uev_acPTvukHTmJMq6lpw.0" target="_blank">www.ostrato.com</a>.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2785Mon, 09 Jun 2015 13:35:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=9819photo

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Heinz Students Develop Solutions to Help Combat Hungerhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2784]]><p> For many kids living with hunger as a part of their daily lives, food served at school is their only reliable source of nutrition. In Allegheny County alone, more than 73,000 kids receive free and reduced price breakfast and lunch meals through the School Breakfast Program (SBP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). In fact, 94 percent of households with children in kindergarten through 12<sup>th</sup> grade report participating in the NSLP. But from June through September, students can no longer depend on those school meals while they are on summer vacation.</p> <p> To combat this, the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank administers a program to reach hungry schoolchildren during the summer months as part of the federally funded Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). In the summer of 2012, the food bank served a total of 622,071 meals and snacks. Despite these numbers, participation rates have waned in recent years, as it is difficult for many families to reach the food distribution centers.</p> <p> To address this problem, the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank called on the expertise of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College to introduce a new data-driven approach to getting food to the children that need it.</p> <p> As part of a student capstone project, Master of Information System Management (MISM) students Eun Ji Noh, Ethel Dubrovsky, Weiwei Liu, Jae Young Park, and Tianyu Yang faced the challenge of raising child participation in the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank&rsquo;s summer food program from 14 percent to the food bank&rsquo;s target participation rate of 40 percent.</p> <p> One of the capstone team&rsquo;s initial problems was finding accurate data from which to draw important information for making future recommendations to the food bank.</p> <p> &ldquo;Although the goal was clearly stated, there were no available data referring the geographical distribution of the eligible children,&rdquo; said Eun Ji Noh, team leader. &ldquo;To make a recommendation for new sites, it was essential to figure out the locations where the client can serve as many children as possible.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Food Bank App Secreenshot" src="image.aspx?id=8817" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p> Utilizing census data, the team developed an algorithm for pinpointing high-priority areas where there are larger populations of families in need of the program with fewer distribution sites. From there, the team turned its findings into usable information by actually pinpointing community hubs like churches, schools, and parks that would reach the highest number of children.</p> <p> After efficiently identifying underserved areas, the team then developed solutions that would communicate the resulting information in a straightforward and accessible way.</p> <p> &ldquo;Our team developed a technology solution that would include current sites, potential sites, and public facility information all on a single Google Maps view to integrate the decision-making process,&rdquo; said Noh.</p> <p> Working with Heinz faculty advisor David Burke, whose has extensive experience developing large- and small-scale technology solutions in a variety of different fields, the team was able to effectively develop a user-friendly Web application with an interactive map that allowed the food bank to see where potential distribution sites were located.</p> <p> &ldquo;We determined 10 locations where about 6,000 additional eligible children could be potentially served,&rdquo; added Noh.</p> <p> &ldquo;The project itself is meaningful in that our team delivered a concrete product, which facilitated the decision-making process for our client,&rdquo; said Weiwei Liu. &ldquo;The faculty who attended our capstone presentation really think the food bank project can turn into a long-term consulting engagement where Heinz students apply their technical knowledge for local community development.&rdquo;</p> <p> The project has the potential to help thousands of families living with food insecurity, and reflects the level of quality and expertise that Heinz students apply in their work. Through collaboration, innovation, and strategic thinking, the team worked to solve a real-world problem that can lead to tangible results.</p> <p> &ldquo;We were thrilled to work with students from the Heinz School to assist us in using information to target our Summer Food Service Program outreach,&rdquo; said Karen Dreyer, Southwestern Pennsylvania Food Security Partnership Director at the food bank. &ldquo;The map that the students produced has made our outreach efforts more strategic, and we are hopeful that more children will receive meals during the summer of 2015 because of this tool.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.pittsburghfoodbank.org/" target="_blank">Learn more about the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-information-systems-and-management/information-systems-management-mism/index.aspx" target="_blank">Learn more about the MISM program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2784Mon, 04 Jun 2015 11:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=8818photo

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Heinz College Alumnus Provides Mission-Driven Leadership in Liberia through Strategic Managementhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2780]]><p> As Peace Corps Country Director in Liberia, Kevin W. Fleming (MSPPM &rsquo;05) juggles a variety of equally important, but seemingly disparate, responsibilities on a daily basis.</p> <p> From setting the strategic vision for the day-to-day administrative responsibilities of his post, to working with the Ministry of Education to place math and science teachers in middle and high schools throughout the country, to facilitating programs that aid in the areas of infectious disease prevention, food security, and gender equality, Fleming enjoys many opportunities to explore the foundational nuances and complexities of public management.</p> <p> In doing so, he regularly utilizes technological, policy, and management strategies he learned as a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM) student at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College.</p> <p> &ldquo;Working in cross-cultural settings, and being an ex-pat managing people from other countries and other cultures, that&rsquo;s a learned skill set,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been honing those skills of working and managing people from other countries, with completely different customs and sayings, for years.</p> <p> &ldquo;Heinz prepared me for managing both folks in a cross-cultural setting, and also different functional areas in a business. So now, I can manage an ITS manager, a finance officer, communications manager, admin teams, and operations. And if I can&rsquo;t explain something in a meeting, I can go and I can build a rough database, or I can go onto what was GIS systems and work there. Having that technical knowledge that I learned in my classes helps me to bridge some of those cross-cultural gaps.&rdquo;</p> <p> From the time he was a young man, Fleming knew that he wanted to lead a life of mission-driven service. But entering his undergraduate career at Xavier University, he wasn&rsquo;t quite sure how to articulate his career goals to his friends and family members.</p> <p> &ldquo;I was part of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes group in high school, and we did some volunteerism,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;And then in college, I went on a few service learning trips to inner-city Cincinnati and Appalachia, and I was like, &lsquo;man, I really want to do this for a living.&rsquo; But I didn&rsquo;t know how to make a career out of it. And I thought I would be poor &ndash; I thought you had to take a vow of poverty like a priest to do this type of work.&rdquo;</p> <p> Through the Teach For America program, Fleming found his voice, and the blueprint for the career path he hoped to follow. As an elementary and middle school teacher in Compton, Calif., the Ohio native developed a strong desire to work in cross-cultural settings in the nonprofit sector.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was the first time that I had ever worked in a setting in the United States with any real kind of socioeconomic and racial diversity,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;It was so eye-opening, and I fell in love with it.</p> <p> &ldquo;When I did Teach For America, I learned about the whole nonprofit world and how all of these nonprofits were starting. The charter school movement was starting. People were putting money into these organizations, and they wanted people with an acumen for business that also wanted to do good to come and work for them.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Kevin Fleming in Village with Kids" src="/image.aspx?id=7801" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />Upon completing his Teach For America placement, Fleming worked for Citizen Schools, a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating after-school programs in low-income communities, before traveling to Lesotho, a tiny country within the Republic of South Africa. Here, as a Peace Corps volunteer, Fleming managed a building project for a gravity flow water system that transported water by pipe from a mountainside natural spring to a small village. It was during this time that Fleming&rsquo;s Peace Corps mentors told him he had the qualities to one day become a Peace Corps Country Director.</p> <p> &ldquo;I knew the skill set that I needed to have in order to reach this goal of eventually becoming a Country Director, and I was aware of those gaps at that time,&rdquo; recalled Fleming. &ldquo;And one of them centered around technology. What I liked about Heinz College was that technology, policy, and management were incorporated into every class. I was interested in all three of those, and I wanted to be good in all three areas.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fleming&rsquo;s desire to grow in these three areas led to his pursuit of a MSPPM degree at Heinz College, which he earned in 2005. As a first-year student, he created a program along with some of his fellow students called The Tsunami Assistance Project, which provided aid for victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.</p> <p> &ldquo;[Associate Dean] Brenda Peyser and Mark Wessel, the dean at the time, let my friends and I essentially start a nonprofit while we were in grad school; who does that?&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;They were so supportive, and that was one of the things I loved about the leadership at Heinz College. They celebrated us doing things in the community and around the globe, and above all, they encourage us to help others in need.&rdquo;</p> <p> After years of traveling the world and leading outreach programs, Fleming landed his &ldquo;dream job&rdquo; in January, when he was appointed Peace Corps Country Director for Liberia, a nation that has been ravaged by the Ebola virus. Fleming said that, through the daily challenges he faces, he often refers back to lessons learned at the Heinz College when managing in cross-cultural settings.</p> <p> &ldquo;You know, there&rsquo;s a class we took at Carnegie Mellon, Organizational Design and Implementation, where we did this lesson around informal and formal networks,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;You have your formal network structures like organizational charts, and then you have your informal structures. I always refer back to that class with my staff, because the rest of the world does not operate how we do in America around these formal structures. You have to really understand the informal lines of communication and what that means.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Peace Corps Volunteers" src="image.aspx?id=7802" style="margin: 10px; float: right; width: 30%;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s these little things that we learned in class that come up when you work in a multicultural settings that add value. I&rsquo;ve worked in four or five of these types of settings now, and this time I&rsquo;m one of three Americans that are representing a U.S. Peace Corps, but 95 percent of my staff members are Liberian. And so, how you go about strategic planning is different. How you influence and motivate people to do what they do is different. And I&rsquo;ve been able to adapt those things that I learned at the Heinz College here.&rdquo;</p> <div> <p> As he moves forward in his journey of mission driven-service, Fleming looks forward to continuing to apply the business principles he learned through his work with Teach for America, the Peace Corps, and Heinz College to the nonprofit world.</p> <p> &ldquo;To me, it&rsquo;s pretty cut and dry: if you run a sound business, then you can serve more people. And I&rsquo;ve worked extremely hard over the years to try and prove that nonprofits can be run just as efficiently as for-profits, thus allowing us to serve more people than we ever imagined.&rdquo;</p> </div> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">More information about the MSPPM Program&gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2780Mon, 01 Jun 2015 13:29:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7800photo

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Heinz Graduates Take the Stage to Celebrate their Achievements and Receive their Diplomashttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2781]]><p> &ldquo;Work hard to be an optimist. It is a simple goal, but hard to reach. Get something done. Make a difference. Think, reflect, and then act.&rdquo;</p> <p> These are just a few of the words of wisdom that Norman Y. Mineta, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation, shared during his keynote presentation at the 2015 H. John Heinz III College Commencement Ceremony.</p> <p> The ceremony, which took place on May 16 at the Petersen Events Center, featured more than 500 Carnegie Mellon University graduates from master&rsquo;s and doctorate programs formally receiving their diplomas as the culmination of their hard work at the Heinz College.</p> <p> One of those students was Michael Adjevi-Benison, a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM) graduate who was chosen by his peers to represent the Class of 2015 as the Commencement Ceremony&rsquo;s student speaker.</p> <p> In addressing the crowd of over 2,000 in attendance, Adjevi-Benison spoke of the need he&rsquo;s felt throughout his life to keep moving forward &ndash; from his childhood in Ghana growing up in a village without electricity or potable water, to the sense of accomplishment he felt in earning his MSPPM degree.</p> <p> &ldquo;We are assembled here today, not only to celebrate our academic accomplishments, but also to reaffirm our earnest desire to make the world a better place,&rdquo; said Adjevi-Benison. &ldquo;Our experiences have prepared us to go out there and shine. Maybe, we may not see each other again, but surely, we will shine together and provide the illumination the world needs.&rdquo;</p> <p> Professor Mark Wessel received the Martcia Wade Teaching Award, which recognizes a Heinz College faculty member each year for outstanding performance in the classroom and commitment to student learning.</p> <p> Wessel, who has been at Heinz College since 1993 and served as Dean of Heinz College from 2003 to 2008, just completed his final year of teaching. In one of his last acts as a faculty member, Wessel gave the students their charge near the end of the ceremony.</p> <p> &ldquo;My plea &ndash; my prayer - is that each of you will find where your sustaining faith truly lies,&rdquo; said Wessel. &ldquo;The faith that persists and sustains you in the face of imminent failure.&nbsp; The faith that enables you to find the goodness in yourself and others.&nbsp; Whether that faith lies in a person or a principle.&nbsp; A god or a nation.&nbsp; An idea or a philosophy.&nbsp; A discipline or an action.</p> <p> &ldquo;To be fully human you must, like Mother Teresa, discover in what immutable force you are willing to invest your faith for all time and to be committed to the demands that faith will inevitably place upon you.&nbsp; If you do that, no wilderness can prove too daunting.&rdquo;</p> <p> In addition to the presentation of the diplomas, a number of members of the Heinz College community were honored for their standout achievements:</p> <ul> <li> Two Heinz students were selected by the Ph.D. committee to receive the Suresh Konda Memorial Ph.D. First Research Paper Award, named in memory of alumnus Konda, who earned his MSPPM and Ph.D. at Heinz College. This year&rsquo;s recipients were Uttara Madurai Ananthakrishnan, for her paper &ldquo;A Tangled Web: Evaluating the Impact of Displaying Fraudulent Reviews on Review Portals,&rdquo; and Arslan Aziz, for his paper &ldquo;Advertisers Revenue versus Consumer Privacy in Online Advertising.&quot;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Two additional Heinz Ph.D. candidates were honored with the Outstanding Teaching Assistant Awards. Hilary Wolfendale received the Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award for the School of Public Policy and Management, and Sriram Somanchi was honored as the Outstanding Teaching Assistant for the School of Information Systems and Management.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Each year, the Barbara Jenkins Award is presented in memory of Jenkins (MSPPM &rsquo;87) to a graduating student who has demonstrated service to Heinz College and made significant contributions to the quality of life in the Pittsburgh community. Claire Goodwin, an MSPPM graduate, received this year&rsquo;s honor.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> The Otto A. Davis Award, bestowed annually in honor of the second Dean of the Heinz College, is voted on by a committee of faculty, staff, and students, and given to an individual who exemplifies the college&rsquo;s commitment to social and racial justice. This year&rsquo;s recipient was Jamie Seabrook, a Master of Public Management (MPM) graduate.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Each year, two Heinz master&rsquo;s students are recognized for their leadership and initiative, excellent academic achievement, strong communication skills, and exceptional promise for future success via the Student Leadership Awards. This year&rsquo;s recipient from the School of Public Policy and Management was Tahir Cheema, an MSPPM graduate. From the School of Information Systems and Management, Trevor Benson, a Master of Science in Information Security Policy and Management graduate, received the honor.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li> Erin Lovas, Assistant Director of Academic Services at Heinz College, received the Staff Excellence Award for outstanding service to the college.</li> </ul> <p> <img align="" alt="Heinz College Commencement Stage" src="/image.aspx?id=7804" style="float: left; margin: 10px; width: 30%;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Our graduates have worked very hard to reach this significant day,&rdquo; said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Heinz College. &ldquo;I would like to congratulate the graduates as well as the friends and family members who have supported them every step of the way.</p> <p> &ldquo;I would also like to recognize the outstanding faculty and administrators who have been instrumental in forging these programs and ensuring the success of today&rsquo;s graduates.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://heinz-video1.andrew.cmu.edu/Mediasite/Play/c8caa0ff16ba4f98b6d72d2b50708cbe1d" target="_blank">Watch the 2015 H. John Heinz III College Commencement Ceremony&gt;&gt;</a>&nbsp;(Please use your Andrew ID and password to access the year&#39;s video recording.)<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXt24Yh9GJI" target="_blank">Watch the 118th Carnegie Mellon University Commencement&gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2781Mon, 29 May 2015 10:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7803photo

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