Heinz College News http://www.heinz.cmu.edu News Stories from H. John Heinz III College Heinz College Alumnus Provides Mission-Driven Leadership in Liberia through Strategic Managementhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2780]]><p> As Peace Corps Country Director in Liberia, Kevin W. Fleming (MSPPM &rsquo;05) juggles a variety of equally important, but seemingly disparate, responsibilities on a daily basis.</p> <p> From setting the strategic vision for the day-to-day administrative responsibilities of his post, to working with the Ministry of Education to place math and science teachers in middle and high schools throughout the country, to facilitating programs that aid in the areas of infectious disease prevention, food security, and gender equality, Fleming enjoys many opportunities to explore the foundational nuances and complexities of public management.</p> <p> In doing so, he regularly utilizes technological, policy, and management strategies he learned as a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM) student at Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College.</p> <p> &ldquo;Working in cross-cultural settings, and being an ex-pat managing people from other countries and other cultures, that&rsquo;s a learned skill set,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been honing those skills of working and managing people from other countries, with completely different customs and sayings, for years.</p> <p> &ldquo;Heinz prepared me for managing both folks in a cross-cultural setting, and also different functional areas in a business. So now, I can manage an ITS manager, a finance officer, communications manager, admin teams, and operations. And if I can&rsquo;t explain something in a meeting, I can go and I can build a rough database, or I can go onto what was GIS systems and work there. Having that technical knowledge that I learned in my classes helps me to bridge some of those cross-cultural gaps.&rdquo;</p> <p> From the time he was a young man, Fleming knew that he wanted to lead a life of mission-driven service. But entering his undergraduate career at Xavier University, he wasn&rsquo;t quite sure how to articulate his career goals to his friends and family members.</p> <p> &ldquo;I was part of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes group in high school, and we did some volunteerism,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;And then in college, I went on a few service learning trips to inner-city Cincinnati and Appalachia, and I was like, &lsquo;man, I really want to do this for a living.&rsquo; But I didn&rsquo;t know how to make a career out of it. And I thought I would be poor &ndash; I thought you had to take a vow of poverty like a priest to do this type of work.&rdquo;</p> <p> Through the Teach For America program, Fleming found his voice, and the blueprint for the career path he hoped to follow. As an elementary and middle school teacher in Compton, Calif., the Ohio native developed a strong desire to work in cross-cultural settings in the nonprofit sector.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was the first time that I had ever worked in a setting in the United States with any real kind of socioeconomic and racial diversity,&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;It was so eye-opening, and I fell in love with it.</p> <p> &ldquo;When I did Teach For America, I learned about the whole nonprofit world and how all of these nonprofits were starting. The charter school movement was starting. People were putting money into these organizations, and they wanted people with an acumen for business that also wanted to do good to come and work for them.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Kevin Fleming in Village with Kids" src="/image.aspx?id=7801" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />Upon completing his Teach For America placement, Fleming worked for Citizen Schools, a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating after-school programs in low-income communities, before traveling to Lesotho, a tiny country within the Republic of South Africa. Here, as a Peace Corps volunteer, Fleming managed a building project for a gravity flow water system that transported water by pipe from a mountainside natural spring to a small village. It was during this time that Fleming&rsquo;s Peace Corps mentors told him he had the qualities to one day become a Peace Corps Country Director.</p> <p> &ldquo;I knew the skill set that I needed to have in order to reach this goal of eventually becoming a Country Director, and I was aware of those gaps at that time,&rdquo; recalled Fleming. &ldquo;And one of them centered around technology. What I liked about Heinz College was that technology, policy, and management were incorporated into every class. I was interested in all three of those, and I wanted to be good in all three areas.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fleming&rsquo;s desire to grow in these three areas led to his pursuit of a MSPPM degree at Heinz College, which he earned in 2005. As a first-year student, he created a program along with some of his fellow students called The Tsunami Assistance Project, which provided aid for victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.</p> <p> &ldquo;[Associate Dean] Brenda Peyser and Mark Wessel, the dean at the time, let my friends and I essentially start a nonprofit while we were in grad school; who does that?&rdquo; said Fleming. &ldquo;They were so supportive, and that was one of the things I loved about the leadership at Heinz College. They celebrated us doing things in the community and around the globe, and above all, they encourage us to help others in need.&rdquo;</p> <p> After years of traveling the world and leading outreach programs, Fleming landed his &ldquo;dream job&rdquo; in January, when he was appointed Peace Corps Country Director for Liberia, a nation that has been ravaged by the Ebola virus. Fleming said that, through the daily challenges he faces, he often refers back to lessons learned at the Heinz College when managing in cross-cultural settings.</p> <p> &ldquo;You know, there&rsquo;s a class we took at Carnegie Mellon, Organizational Design and Implementation, where we did this lesson around informal and formal networks,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;You have your formal network structures like organizational charts, and then you have your informal structures. I always refer back to that class with my staff, because the rest of the world does not operate how we do in America around these formal structures. You have to really understand the informal lines of communication and what that means.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Peace Corps Volunteers" src="image.aspx?id=7802" style="margin: 10px; float: right; width: 30%;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s these little things that we learned in class that come up when you work in a multicultural settings that add value. I&rsquo;ve worked in four or five of these types of settings now, and this time I&rsquo;m one of three Americans that are representing a U.S. Peace Corps, but 95 percent of my staff members are Liberian. And so, how you go about strategic planning is different. How you influence and motivate people to do what they do is different. And I&rsquo;ve been able to adapt those things that I learned at the Heinz College here.&rdquo;</p> <div> <p> As he moves forward in his journey of mission driven-service, Fleming looks forward to continuing to apply the business principles he learned through his work with Teach for America, the Peace Corps, and Heinz College to the nonprofit world.</p> <p> &ldquo;To me, it&rsquo;s pretty cut and dry: if you run a sound business, then you can serve more people. And I&rsquo;ve worked extremely hard over the years to try and prove that nonprofits can be run just as efficiently as for-profits, thus allowing us to serve more people than we ever imagined.&rdquo;</p> </div> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">More information about the MSPPM Program&gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2780Mon, 26 May 2015 13:29:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7800photo

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Heinz Students Unveilhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2779]]><p> In 2012, Robert J. Gordon, a prominent economist at Northwestern University, argued in his paper <a href="http://www.nber.org/papers/w18315.pdf" target="_blank">Is U.S. Economic Growth Over? Faltering Innovation Confronts the Six Headwinds</a> that there are no new technological advances on the horizon that are comparable to the rise of computer technology from the 1960s to today. Gordon postulated that, as a result of this lack of technological advancement, labor productivity growth would experience a continual slowdown over the next 100 years until it reaches levels not seen since the 1800s. This would signal an almost complete halt to American productivity, which would then lead to extensive economic implications.</p> <p> But is the future of U.S. productivity so bleak? A team of Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College students went to the White House to prove otherwise.</p> <p> Lee Branstetter, Heinz College professor of Economics and Public Policy, initiated the research endeavor upon being contacted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Branstetter helped assemble a capstone project with a team of Master of Science in Public Policy and Management students dedicated to determining if the productivity outlook was as bad as it seemed.</p> <p> &ldquo;Even before the global financial crisis hit, productivity growth took a dive,&rdquo; said Branstetter.&nbsp; &ldquo;This is a big deal, since the most important engine for growth can be productivity.</p> <p> &ldquo;Productivity affects incomes and living standards, and the implications are stark if it doesn&rsquo;t come back.&rdquo;</p> <p> The capstone project, &ldquo;It&rsquo;s Not Over Yet: An Optimistic Take on American Productivity Growth,&rdquo; comprised of students Tara O&rsquo;Neill, Laura Tengelsen, Dennis Sawyers, Jonathan Lakey, Dini Maghfirra, and Marwa Al-Fakhri. The team&rsquo;s approach was to interview leading experts at Carnegie Mellon University in the fields of e-learning, robotics, and big data to ascertain whether any of these innovations could lead to gains in labor productivity similar to those seen in earlier periods in American history. By synthesizing industry data with expert insight and the most-up-to-date research, the team hoped to show that Robert Gordon&rsquo;s belief in a low-growth future is misplaced, and Americans can look forward to a prosperous future.</p> <p> The team chose the fields of big data, e-learning, and robotics as case studies because of their potential to dramatically increase productivity, and because of the ease of access to leaders in those fields working at Carnegie Mellon University. After all, big data is altering the way that health care, America&rsquo;s largest sector of the economy, currently operates. E-learning has experienced incredibly large gains in student outcomes in some studies, and promises a future where personalized education is available to a mass population at an affordable price for the first time in human history. Likewise, the field of robotics is steadily advancing, and has generated robots with capabilities unimaginable even 50 years ago.</p> <p> &ldquo;Fortunately, it turns out Pittsburgh is the epicenter of research on e-learning,&rdquo; said Jonathan Lakey, who, along with Laura Tingleson, researched the e-learning portion of the paper. &ldquo;There was a study done on software that was developed at Carnegie Mellon University by Robert Anderson that was found to double the amount of learning on a specific set of coursework.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team argues that e-learning provides the promise of customized learning for the masses for the first time in history. E-learning allows for an adaptive education in terms of pace and skill, and it can potentially double the amount of education one could receive yearly.</p> <p> &ldquo;Evidence is mounting that these learning technologies can be incredibly effective, and more capital is being invested in them,&rdquo; continued Lakey. &ldquo;If programs could be developed and implemented on a wide scale and across the most economically viable subjects, the potential gains in learning and, consequently, productivity, could be enormous.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="Heinz Students give a presentation at the White House" src="image.aspx?id=7798" style="margin: 10px; float: left; width: 412.5px;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;Robotics is a real story in terms of productivity,&rdquo; said Dennis Sawyers, who tackled the field of robotics for the project along with fellow student Dini Maghfirra. &ldquo;Prior advances in technology, especially in agriculture and manufacturing, have enhanced productivity by replacing human labor with machine labor. But a new wave of robotics innovations promise to affect a whole new range of industries: transportation, logistics, warehousing, low-skilled services, and construction.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team found studies that indicated that manufacturing productivity would increase if countries would adopt the same robot-intensity as the most automated country in each manufacturing sector. The studies estimated that productivity would increase by 1.5 percent for every one-unit increase in robots per million hours worked.</p> <p> However, the rise of robotics will not take place without its challenges.</p> <p> &ldquo;Robotics will increase productivity, but the extent and speed of the revolution can be heavily influenced by government policy,&rdquo; said Sawyers. &ldquo;Higher minimum wages and other laws that increase the cost of workers will drive automation in the United States just as it has in Europe, but even without those increases to cost of labor, automation will occur as the price of robots falls and the capabilities of robots increase.&rdquo;</p> <p> Finally, the team cited the power of big data and how it relates to the health care industry as another reason why productivity in America can be saved.</p> <p> &ldquo;The health care industry is rife with unnecessary services, inefficiently delivered services, excessive administrative costs, prices that are too high, fraud, and missed prevention opportunities,&rdquo; said Tara O&rsquo;Neill, who handled the data portion of the project with Marwa Al-Fakhri. &ldquo;Eliminating waste and inefficiencies could reduce costs significantly while simultaneously improving outcomes, much of which can be done through the use of big data and new health care information technologies.&rdquo;</p> <p> With tremendous advances in data collection, storage, processing, and analysis, the team found that proper implementation of big data can help put an end to the overuse of health care services, fraudulent claims, excessive administration costs, and inefficiently delivered care.</p> <p> &ldquo;We recognize that cost savings are not necessarily increases in productivity; however, any money that is saved and freed up in the economy can then be invested in areas of the economy that are productive,&rdquo; continued O&rsquo;Neill. &ldquo;Because most health care spending does not actually produce anything tangible or productive in the economy, any spending on it simply takes away from money available to be spent on goods and services in the economy that are productive and which create wealth. Therefore, decreasing spending on health care allows for increased spending on parts of the economy that are productive.</p> <p> &ldquo;Additionally, there are many new opportunities to improve the health of our nation&rsquo;s citizens, which will, in turn, provide for a more productive workforce.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;These really are three domains that could lead to tremendous economic growth,&rdquo; added Branstetter. &ldquo;The health care sector represents a fifth of the U.S. gross domestic product. Human skill and the education needed to learn it is an important determinant of productivity.</p> <p> &ldquo;We can move the productivity needle.&rdquo;</p> <p> Branstetter and the team were invited to the White House&rsquo;s Eisenhower Executive Offices to present their findings to Office of Science and Technology Policy. The OSTEP members were receptive to the team&rsquo;s findings, and were surprised at the potential gains in productivity that could be found.</p> <p> &ldquo;They had lots of questions and requests for follow-up discussions,&rdquo; said Sawyers. &ldquo;From a students perspective, when you&rsquo;re interacting with policymakers on their level, you realize you can do it too.</p> <p> &ldquo;You feel like you&rsquo;re actually making a difference.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/school-of-public-policy-management/public-policy-management-msppm/index.aspx" target="_blank">More information about the MSPPM Program&gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2779Mon, 20 May 2015 13:30:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7797photo

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Norman Y. Mineta, former Secretary of Transportation, to Give Keynote Address at the Heinz College Commencement Ceremonyhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2778]]><p> Secretary Norman Y. Mineta, an innovative leader in the fields of transportation, commerce, public policy, and technology, will be the keynote speaker at the Heinz College Commencement Ceremony at 2 p.m., Saturday, May 16 at the Petersen Events Center.</p> <p> For almost 30 years, Secretary Mineta represented San Jose, Calif. as a public servant - first on the City Council, then as Mayor, and then from 1975-1995 as a Member of Congress. During his time serving the Silicon Valley area, he was a pioneer in helping the tech sector engage in public policy. While in Congress, he also served as the Chairman of the House Transportation and Public Works Committee from 1992-1994, after having chaired the Subcommittee on Aviation and the Subcommittee on Surface Transportation.</p> <p> In 2000, President Bill Clinton appointed Secretary Mineta as the United States Secretary of Commerce. At the Department of Commerce, Secretary Mineta was known for his work on technology issues, for achieving international cooperation and intergovernmental coordination on complex fisheries issues, and for streamlining the patent and trademark process.</p> <p> From 2001-2006, Secretary Mineta served as Secretary of Transportation under President George W. Bush. In this capacity, <img alt="Norman Mineta" src="image.aspx?id=7784" style="float: left; width: 30%; margin: 10px;" />Secretary Mineta issued the notable order to ground all civilian air traffic on September 11, 2001. Following the events of September 11, he guided the creation of the Transportation Security Administration - an agency with more than 65,000 employees - the largest mobilization of a new federal agency since World War II. Mineta was also a vice president of Lockheed Martin, where he oversaw the first successful implementation of the EZ-Pass system in New York State.</p> <p> A graduate of the University of California, Berkley, Secretary Mineta served on the Smithsonian&rsquo;s Board of Regents from 1979 through 1995 and supported the establishment of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American program in 1997. He has been a lifelong champion of civil rights and, as a son of Japanese immigrants, spent time during World War II at an internment camp in Wyoming.</p> <p> &ldquo;Norman Mineta&rsquo;s career achievements are extraordinary, and in many ways he is the embodiment of many of our programs here at Heinz College,&rdquo; said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean of Heinz College. &ldquo;His life reflects the Heinz College mission, and we are looking forward to giving him a very warm reception on May 16.&rdquo;</p> <p> Recognized for his leadership, Secretary Mineta has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom &ndash; the nation&rsquo;s highest civilian honor &ndash; and the Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy, which is awarded for significant public service of enduring value to aviation in the United States.</p> <p> Currently, Secretary Mineta is the President and CEO of Mineta and Associates, LLC. He is married to Danealia (Deni) Mineta and has two sons, David K. Mineta and Stuart S. Mineta and two stepsons, Robert M. Brantner and Mark D. Brantner.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2778Mon, 07 May 2015 11:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7785photo

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Alumna Paints Broad Impact on Cultural Scenehttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2777]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cmu.edu/piper/stories/2015/may/artfully-done.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> When you&rsquo;re a kid growing up abroad, moving from country to country, the arts can come in handy.</p> <p> Music, dancing, visual arts &mdash; even culinary arts &mdash; were universal languages that helped Kathryn Heidemann acclimate to every new culture she lived in, from Venezuela to Germany to the Land Down Under.</p> <p> &ldquo;There were times when I was uprooted right in the middle of a school year. Sometimes I had to learn to speak a whole new language. The arts were my means of universal communication and social survival,&rdquo; said Heidemann, director of the Heinz College&rsquo;s Master of Arts Management (MAM) program.</p> <p> They also were the foundation for a career that enables her to support the arts in ways that help ensure their survival.</p> <p> Heidemann studied dance and arts management in Chicago and enjoyed working at various arts organizations there and in New York City and Detroit, but something was missing.</p> <p> &ldquo;As a creative person I was really looking for a rigorous academic program that would unify my right and left brain, while giving my left brain a &lsquo;boost&rsquo; of sorts with quantitative management skills. I had worked in the field for a number of years and I wanted to be pushed to a whole new level with regard to data-driven management within the arts,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p> That&rsquo;s when she decided to move to Pittsburgh and enroll in Heinz College&rsquo;s MAM program. The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust hired her when she graduated, and for eight years her list of professional successes grew by leaps and bounds.</p> <p> She founded and managed 200 arts master&rsquo;s degree programs in conjunction with the Dance Council, PNC Broadway Across America and TrustPresents series. She produced 30 of the city&rsquo;s popular Gallery Crawls, which are quarterly showcases of arts entertainment. And she oversaw three First Night Pittsburgh festivals, the region&rsquo;s largest single night arts festival that takes place on New Year&rsquo;s Eve, breaking attendance records and reaching millions of students, teachers and community members during her tenure.</p> <p> During that time, she also took two working sabbaticals to assume leadership roles abroad and domestically as a venue manager for the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the world&rsquo;s largest arts festival, and as an operations manager for Jacob&rsquo;s Pillow Dance Festival in the Berkshires.</p> <p> Consider Mayor Bill Peduto among the people on whom she left a lasting impression. He recently appointed her to the City of Pittsburgh&rsquo;s Art Commission, which works to improve the aesthetic quality of the city&rsquo;s public spaces.</p> <p> &ldquo;Mayor Peduto is, was and always will be a very strong advocate for the arts. I am honored and humbled to have been chosen as an art commissioner under his leadership, and hope that my background in arts management, understanding of arts policy issues, and passion for the arts and our communities will help me be the best servant to this city that I can be,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p> Heidemann feels the arts can play a big role in fostering innovation and creativity, both within ourselves and within the community.</p> <p> &ldquo;There are ways you can do that which don&rsquo;t necessarily mean you have to be an artist for a living. The arts are a right, not a privilege. If we all tap into out inner artist, we can learn to better engage in creative problem-solving and contribute better to what we&rsquo;re doing in our own respective fields &mdash; science, technology, business and other areas.&rdquo;</p> <p> As director of the MAM program, Heidemann says she has been able to stay more connected, especially at the global level, to the arts than she has in any other job.</p> <p> She has worked at international festivals before, but her affiliation with CMU has enabled her to work on international partnerships. She leads the dual degree partnership with the University of Bologna&rsquo;s GIOCA (Graduate Degree in Innovation and Organization of Culture and the Arts) program in Italy. She enjoys working with international students and arts performers, attends many international performances and speaks at arts administration conferences around the globe.</p> <p> &ldquo;Due to the nature of my job and the diversity of my students&rsquo; interests, I have to have my finger on the pulse of every facet of the arts industry &mdash; what&rsquo;s happening in the museum, gallery, symphony, opera, theater and dance company worlds. Certainly my favorite part about the job is not just about breadth of access to the arts, but also about the people. The students and the alumni are such a rich part of what I do and make me love coming to work every day.&rdquo;</p> <p> While other universities have master of arts management programs, Heidemann says CMU&rsquo;s program is in a class all its own.</p> <p> &ldquo;What impresses me most about CMU is the students. Many of them come from arts backgrounds but learn to &lsquo;speak data&rsquo; very quickly. They quickly adapt to new ways of thinking, new ways of seeing the world and new ways of solving problems,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Many of them have specific goals in mind when they arrive here, but may quickly find a whole new course to chart and a whole new part of themselves that they didn&rsquo;t know was there. I love to see what they do, where they end up. They just continue to surprise me.&rdquo;</p> <p> And sometimes, she surprises her students. Heidemann has often been found playing bass guitar in local and national rock, punk and classic country bands.</p> <p> An active member of her community, Heidemann was recently named by Pittsburgh Magazine as one of the city&rsquo;s &ldquo;40 Under 40&rdquo; honorees for her passion, commitment and overall impact on the Pittsburgh region.</p> <p> &ldquo;Certainly, it&rsquo;s a labor of love,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s so wonderful to find myself in this cycle where I was a student of this program that I am now managing. The passion for what I did informs my new passion, which is really helping the next generation discover this exciting field of arts management and make a difference in the arts in a different kind of way.&rdquo;</p> <p> Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto (above, left) has named CMU&#39;s Kathryn Heidemann (above, right) to the city&#39;s Art Commission, which works to improve the aesthetic quality of the city&rsquo;s public spaces.</p> <p> Photo by Matte Braidic.</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=2777Mon, 05 May 2015 23:19:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=7767photo

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Carnegie Mellon Professor Acquisti Awarded Fellowship from Carnegie Corporation of New Yorkhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1776]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/march/joel-tarr-honored.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> <em>Renowned Privacy Researcher One of Only 32 Recipients of Prestigious Honor</em></p> <p> PITTSBURGH&mdash;Carnegie Mellon University Professor Alessandro Acquisti was named today to the inaugural class of the Andrew Carnegie Fellows by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.</p> <p> Acquisti is one of only 32 recipients of the fellowship and was selected from more than 300 nominees.</p> <p> A noted economist and privacy researcher, Acquisti&rsquo;s fellowship will investigate the impact of the data economy on societal welfare and the distribution of wealth, focusing on how the erosion of privacy and how the rise of &ldquo;big data&rdquo; may affect economic growth, equality, and discrimination.</p> <p> &ldquo;I&rsquo;m pleased to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow and excited to have the opportunity to further explore the possible economic effects of the data economy through this fellowship,&rdquo; said Acquisti, associate professor of information technology and public policy at CMU&rsquo;s Heinz College. &ldquo;It is quite likely that the expanding collection, analysis, and use of large amounts of individuals&rsquo; data will bring about both positive and negative consequences for different stakeholders, and my research will explore those impacts. I thank the Carnegie Corporation for this wonderful honor.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p> <p> Acquisti&rsquo;s research investigates the economics and behavioral economics of privacy, including privacy in online social networks. His studies have been published in leading journals across diverse disciplines, including science, information technology, consumer research and marketing. Acquisti&rsquo;s 2009 study on the predictability of social security numbers received international media attention. Two years after the study, the Social Security Administration changed the assignment scheme of Social Security numbers.</p> <p> &ldquo;Alessandro&rsquo;s groundbreaking work on Privacy and its impact on society are representative of the kind of work that you will see here at the Heinz College. I am very pleased that he is named the Andrew Carnegie Fellow by the prestigious Carnegie Corporation of New York&rdquo;, said Ramayya Krishnan, Dean, CMU&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College. &nbsp;</p> <p> Carnegie Corporation is awarding up to $200,000 to each fellow, which will enable them to take sabbaticals to devote time to their research and writing. The fellowship program provides support for scholars in the social sciences and humanities and aims to provide new perspectives on the program&rsquo;s overarching theme for 2015: Current and Future Challenges to U.S. Democracy and International Order. Winning proposals address issues including policing and race, big data and privacy, the impact of the aging population and the safety of generic drugs, among other topics.&nbsp;</p> <p> <em><strong>Alessandro Acquisti (pictured above) is an Associate Professor of Information Systems and Public Policy at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University. His research investigates the economics and behavioral economics of privacy, and privacy in online social networks.</strong></em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1776Mon, 22 Apr 2015 00:20:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6741photo

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MAM Alumni Panel Focuses on Community Development and the Artshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1762]]><p> There&rsquo;s no doubt that the arts and artistic expression can do many great things.&nbsp; The arts can unite and they allow people to express themselves and to communicate in unexpected and effective ways.&nbsp;</p> <p> But can the arts promote measurable change within entire communities?</p> <p> The Master of Arts Management Program helped students explore that reality last month when they put together a special panel as part of their monthly speaker series featuring 4 MAM alumni who consistently strive to strengthen their communities in Pittsburgh, PA through the arts.</p> <p> The panel included:</p> <p> - Tirzah deCaria (MAM &rsquo;10)&ndash; Co-Director of <a href="http://www.citizenstudios.org/" target="_blank">Creative Citizen Studios</a>, who also served as moderator for the panel</p> <p> - Alecia Shipman Young (MAM &rsquo;10)&ndash; Youth Arts Liaison for the <a href="http://manchesterbidwell.org/replication/national-center-for-arts-and-technology/" target="_blank">National Center for the Arts &amp; Technology</a></p> <p> - Ayisha A. Morgan-Lee (MAM &rsquo;07) &ndash; Founder, CEO &amp; Artistic Director of the <a href="http://www.5678hdat.org/" target="_blank">Hill Dance Academy Theater</a></p> <p> - Michelle Clesse (MAM &rsquo;10) &ndash; Communications and Development Manager for the <a href="http://www.unionproject.org/" target="_blank">Union Project</a></p> <p> Each panelist brought with them their unique professional experience with community building through the arts.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="mam_panel2" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6598" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />deCaria and Creative Citizens Studios seeks to build bridges between the arts community and disability communities, by offering accessibility training programs for cultural organizations, teaching life-skill building arts classes&nbsp;and&nbsp;creating community engagement through arts programs within human service provider organizations.<br /> <br /> Young and The National Center for Arts &amp; Technology, a part of the Manchester Bidwell Corporation, operates under the notion that &ldquo;art changes lives.&rdquo; As Youth Liaison, Young helps develop arts programs for communities where poverty is major issue.&nbsp; Participants in NCAT programs continually achieve a 99% graduation rate later in life.</p> <p> Morgan-Lee&rsquo;s Hill Dance Academy Theater (HDAT) is devoted to developing and training dancers in Black dance traditions, expanding knowledge and contributions of Black Dance traditions and create emerging dance artists who will sustain Black dance in the Black community.</p> <p> As Communications and Development Manager for the Union Project, Clesse helps evolve the projects mission of creating a neighborhood space where people could come together to connect, create, and celebrate.&nbsp; The Union Project continually strives to use art as the means of finding creative solutions to improve the community.</p> <p> &ldquo;The alumni&rsquo;s enthusiasm for their work was infectious,&rdquo; said Nora Ames Fleury, a MAM &rsquo;15 student.&nbsp; &ldquo;It was inspiring to hear the impact MAM alums are making in the Pittsburgh community and see how fulfilled and happy they are five to eight years out of the program.&rdquo;</p> <p> Each of the panelists agreed that people were at the core of what they do.</p> <p> &ldquo;You&rsquo;ve got to listen and know your community in order to create change,&rdquo; said Morgan-Lee.<img align="" alt="mam_panel3" class="right" src="image.aspx?id=6599" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: right;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;You have to be aware of the landscape of the arts in your city,&rdquo; added Young.&nbsp; &ldquo;You need to listen and incorporate the community into what you do.&rdquo;</p> <p> Clesse agreed and added that you needed to work with your &ldquo;Board of Neighbors&rdquo;.</p> <p> However, making change in communities can still have its share of difficulties. From tracking and measuring change, to the misconceptions of non-involved community members and the inherent challenges of running an arts program; change, while possible, is rarely easy to come by.</p> <p> &ldquo;Leadership,&rdquo; said Young, &ldquo;Leadership can be the biggest roadblock to change.&nbsp; Individuals are not always available to lead these initiatives in communities.</p> <p> &ldquo;Some projects can&rsquo;t continue because the right leader has not emerged.&rdquo;</p> <p> They all agreed that the MAM program is what prepared them with the leadership abilities they needed for the challenges they face.</p> <p> &ldquo;I use a lot of the knowledge I learned (at Heinz) in my day-to-day,&rdquo; said Clesse.&nbsp; &ldquo;The knowledge you learn here is exactly what you need to leverage what you&rsquo;ll learn as you grow professionally.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;The presentations, the evaluations, the database training,&rdquo; said Young, &ldquo;it all becomes invaluable in your career.&rdquo;</p> <p> Morgan-Lee concluded with a sentiment that all of the alumni enthusiastically agreed with.</p> <p> &ldquo;We&rsquo;re doing successfully as MAM alumni and we love what we do.&rdquo;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=188" target="">More information on the Master of Arts Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1762Mon, 14 Apr 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6596photo

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Heinz College Project Shines a Spotlight on Blight at the Fels National Policy ChallengeNewhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1775]]><p> A cross-disciplinary team of students from Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College were recently chosen as finalists at the Fels National Public Policy Challenge for their unique approach to tackling the issue of blight. Their project, The Wilkinsburg Vacant Home Tour, will showcase abandoned properties, leading tour participants on a journey back in time through the narratives of historic buildings in Wilkinsburg, located near Pittsburgh, PA.</p> <p> The Vacant Home Tour, which takes place on May 9<sup>th</sup> in Wilkinsburg, will feature stories of the families and the people who lived and worked in the homes. The memories of these homes will map out their historical impact in creating the communities and neighborhoods in which they exist.&nbsp; The aim, through the tour, is to increase interest in these vacant homes and find the properties new owners.</p> <p> Community members from the neighborhood will be engaged to serve as Tour Docents, greeting participants at each stop along the tour and helping to further reveal the forgotten stories of these properties. Tour participants will be provided with a &ldquo;tour kit&rdquo; which will offer them the tools that will help them visualize what the house once looked like in full vibrancy, a tour map that will work hand-in-hand with the visual prompts along the tour route, additional background information on each of the properties, and information on resources available to aid participants in more actively engaging these homes and buildings.</p> <p> &ldquo;It has been a pleasure working with the Vacant Home Tour team,&rdquo; said David Lassman, Distinguished Service Professor of Organizational Management at Heinz College. &ldquo;The team has developed an innovative solution to a very visible and expensive problem: &nbsp;urban blight.&nbsp; This grass-roots project relies heavily on community stakeholders, especially citizens, to both plan and implement.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;They are passionate about the project and committed to the work,&ldquo; added Lassman.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="vacant_home_tour" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6729&amp;width=350&amp;height=453" style="width: 350px; height: 453px;" />&ldquo;We want people to look at them, not as problems, but as spaces with potential meant to be engaged with in positive ways,&rdquo; said Kenneth Chu, a member of the student team.</p> <p> &ldquo;Our program intends to change the perception of blight while at the same time connecting new residents with old-timers in the neighborhood of Wilkinsburg,&rdquo; said team member Eleni Katrini about the project. &ldquo;The Fels Challenge was a great opportunity to showcase the program we have been working on since September to a national audience.&rdquo;</p> <p> The National Invitational Public Policy Challenge, hosted by the Fels Institute of Government at the University of Pennsylvania in association with Governing Magazine, is an unparalleled opportunity for students to learn, connect, and serve. The competition challenges student teams to develop a policy proposal and civic campaign plan to achieve significant change in their communities, making it a perfect forum for the Vacant Home Tour.</p> <p> &ldquo;I believe that an event like the Fels Challenge is a great opportunity for students to feel motivated to work on public policy problems and come up with innovative ideas,&rdquo; added Katrini. &ldquo;Most of the ideas presented at the event were dealing with social issues and were using policy, technology, design and services to tackle with the problems at hand.</p> <p> &ldquo;It was an opportunity for us to contextualize our work with what other policy makers, current and future are doing, to share with them the work of students from Carnegie Mellon University, and to compare notes on current and future trends, challenges, and hopes in social innovation,&rdquo; said Chu.&nbsp; &ldquo;There were public officials, public administrators, and leaders of non-profit organizations in attendance, and their feedback and advice on our work were invaluable to making the Vacant Home Tour a more effective program.&ldquo;</p> <p> For more information on the upcoming Vacant Home Tour on Saturday May 9<sup>th</sup>, visit <a href="http://www.vacanthometour.com" target="_blank">www.vacanthometour.com</a>, <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Vacant-Home-Tour/565183226918550?fref=ts" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/pages/Vacant-Home-Tour/565183226918550?fref=ts</a> or contact <a href="mailto:vacanthometour@gmail.com">vacanthometour@gmail.com</a>.</p> <p> <em>(Above pictured from left to right: Rene Cuenca, Karlee Turkaly, Shawneil Campbell, Eleni Katrini, and Kenneth Chu)</em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1775Mon, 02 Apr 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6728photo

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Joel Tarr Wins Distinguished Service Awardhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1774]]><p> <em>This story originally appeared on <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2015/march/joel-tarr-honored.html" target="_blank">CMU.edu</a>.</em></p> <p> Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/tarr.html">Joel Tarr</a>, who has spent his career studying the environmental history of cities and the history and impact of their technological systems, was awarded the 2015 Distinguished Service Award by the <a href="http://aseh.net/">American Society for Environmental History</a> (ASEH).</p> <p> The ASEH gives the award each year to an individual who has contributed significantly to the development of the organization. Tarr received the award at the society&rsquo;s annual conference in Washington, D.C., on March 21.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/acker.html">Caroline Acker,</a> head of the <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/">Department of History</a> in the <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/dietrich/">Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences</a>, said that the field of environmental history is on the rise as issues like climate change and global warming take on urgency. She believes Tarr&#39;s work has been critical.</p> <p> &ldquo;Joel was a pioneer in environmental history that brought cities into environmental studies. Environmental history is one of the most dynamic areas of history today and Joel&#39;s research into the infrastructure development that knitted cities into systems is one of the reasons,&rdquo; Acker said.</p> <p> Tarr, the Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy in the History Department, has additional appointments in the <a href="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/index.aspx">H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management</a> and the <a href="http://www.epp.cmu.edu/">Department of Engineering and Public Policy</a>. A CMU faculty member since 1967, he has received numerous other honors, including the Society for the History of Technology&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.historyoftechnology.org/awards/davinci.html">Leonardo da Vinci Medal</a>. The society&#39;s highest honor, the da Vinci medal goes to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the history of technology through research, teaching, publication and other activities. He also received CMU&rsquo;s Robert Doherty Prize for Educational Leadership in 1991.</p> <p> Tarr has served on National Research Council committees dealing with issues of urban infrastructure, public transit and water pollution. He was president of the Public Works Historical Society in 1982-83 and president of the Urban History Association in 1999.</p> <p> &ldquo;I am deeply honored to receive this award from the American Society of Environmental History,&rdquo; Tarr said. &ldquo;I am especially proud of the fact that this award, as well as the other awards I have received from the professional organizations in the specialties of technological and urban history, reflects the interdisciplinary orientation I have absorbed at Carnegie Mellon. It has been a privilege to be at this university for these many years.&rdquo;</p> <p> For more information on Tarr, visit <a href="http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/tarr.html">http://www.history.cmu.edu/faculty/tarr.html</a>.</p> <p> <em><strong>Joel Tarr (pictured above), the Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy in the History Department, has spent his career studying the environmental history of cities and the history and impact of their technological systems.</strong></em></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1774Mon, 28 Mar 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6724photo

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Paterson Produces First Filmhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1773]]><p> Jonny Paterson (MEIM 12) is in the middle of post production on his first film, Halfway. Executive Produced with former NFL star Nnamdi Asomugha (&quot;Beasts of No Nation&quot;), Frequent MEIM Guest Speaker, Tommy Oliver, and MEIM Faculty member Jonathan Baker, the film shot for 30 days in WI this past fall. MEIMLAND caught up with Jonny about the film.</p> <p> <strong>How did you first get involved with HALFWAY?</strong><br /> &ldquo;The writer of HALFWAY, Ben Caird, was a close friend of mine and someone with whom I had been developing another feature film project with, when the idea of me producing HALFWAY first arose. HALFWAY wasn&#39;t available when we first met as there were other producers circling it. I always liked the material and he knew that. He began to get frustrated at the lack of progress with other potential stakeholders and asked me if I wanted to produce it for him. However it only made sense for both of us if I was able to bring certain tangibles to the table, otherwise I would essentially be just another producer letting him down. I knew Quinton Aaron from a feature called 1982, which I worked on with fellow CMU alumnus, Tommy Oliver (HS &#39;06). Tommy wrote, directed and produced that project and was kind enough to give me my first on-set experience as a PA. I knew that if I could get Quinton on HALFWAY then the project would grow in stature and potential. Tommy set up the meeting, Ben and I pitched Quinton and by the end of lunch he was on board as our lead actor. Both Tommy and Quinton are also Executive Producers on the film.&rdquo;</p> <p> <strong>Do you have any advice for aspiring film producers that you wish you had known when you started?</strong><br /> &ldquo;I have learned a great deal throughout this process, but one thing I would reinforce is that everything you are taught about how difficult it is and how challenging it is to get your first movie made is TRUE. It&#39;s not just the &#39;bringing everything together&#39;, it&#39;s the mental strain and ability to handle the ups and downs that make it such a trying profession. You need to be self-confident and back yourself to the hilt. That being said, this should absolutely be a motivating factor as opposed to a disillusioning one. If you want to be a producer then you simply have to go out and produce.. I had the support of various people - my family, my friends, mentors such as Tommy Oliver and former professors such as Jonathan Baker (also an Executive Producer of HALFWAY). Take every class and stay in touch with all your professors. Your experiences at Sundance and SXSW should be pillars of your CMU experience. Networking opportunities like those are few and far between. Try and get into the office of a film producer and learn from them first hand. I worked for (MEIM professor) Paula Wagner for a year and credit her a great deal with helping me realize I wanted to be a producer. Working for Paula taught me that for an independent producer, every hour is different with a new set of challenges and a new set of things to measure a successful day by. Also - get people to like you, that&#39;s vital. Nobody is going to make it happen for you, but you are absolutely going to want that support network to help capitalize on your hard work and realize your potential.</p> <p> <strong>What are you currently working on, and do you have any films in the pipeline that we should look forward to?</strong><br /> &ldquo;I&#39;m in post production on HALFWAY. Editing a feature film is a long and arduous process, but I&#39;m learning a great deal doing it for the first time. Hopefully, the movie is good and it opens doors for me (which it already seems to be doing). In terms of what&#39;s next, I have an Irish set project (I&#39;m from Scotland) that I&#39;ve starting raising money for and attaching actors to. It&#39;s called THE SCAVENGERS and the screenplay was on the Hollywood Blacklist. I&#39;ve also written a TV pilot that I&#39;d love to get made. Ultimately I just need to keep going. The advice I got during the HALFWAY process is &#39;don&#39;t, under any circumstances, give up&#39; and I intend to follow that&rdquo;.</p> <p> - By Becca Nadler (MEIM 2015)</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1773Mon, 24 Mar 2015 16:02:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6701photo

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MEIM Student Designs Promotional Images for Maroon 5http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1772]]><p> Second year MEIM Julia Wu has been interning at Career Artist Management (CAM) since the fall semester. The music management company, located in Beverly Hills, has an impressive roster of about 20 artists including Maroon 5, Adam Levine, Hinder, Robin Thicke, Macy Gray,&nbsp;</p> <p> <img alt="Julia Wu MEIM 2015" class="left" src="http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/image.aspx?id=6680" style="margin: 10px; float: left; width: 15%;" /></p> <p> and Better Than Ezra, among others. So how did Julia end up designing promo images for Maroon 5?</p> <p> &ldquo;I work with the Director of Social Media and Digital Marketing. My main job is to design promotional imagery for our clients&#39; activities, whether that be one-sheets or social media images. Maroon 5 is our biggest account and I&#39;ve been designing a lot of tour promos for social media. It&#39;s a really chill place and it&#39;s nice that they trust me enough to grant me a lot of creative freedom for my designs. It&#39;s really rewarding to see something you designed get so many Likes or Favorites on social media.&rdquo;</p> <p> Julia has loved her time at CAM and her internship has been a great learning experience. Click on the links to see some of Julia&rsquo;s work.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152870053618482/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152870053618482/?type=3&amp;theater</a></p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/a.10150138876298482.302819.5330548481/10153077762273482/?type=1&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/a.10150138876298482.302819.5330548481/10153077762273482/?type=1&amp;theater</a></p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152849843183482/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152849843183482/?type=3&amp;theater</a></p> <p> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152812282238482/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/maroon5/photos/pb.5330548481.-2207520000.1423792120./10152812282238482/?type=3&amp;theater</a></p> <p> - By Julia Wu (MEIM 2015)</p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1772Mon, 24 Mar 2015 15:47:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6700photo

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CMU Student Wins Big at National Health Policy Debate Competitionhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1771]]><p> Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s Christophe Combemale, a student in Heinz College&rsquo;s accelerated master&rsquo;s program, was part of the winning team at the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs and Administration&rsquo;s&nbsp; (NASPAA) inaugural student simulation competition.</p> <p> The competition, held at the University of Maryland, was a daylong event that brought together graduate students from NASPAA schools&nbsp;to analyze a current&nbsp;health policy problem, with the direction of providing a locally led &ldquo;bottom up&rdquo; approach to reform, and present their solutions to a panel of judges.&nbsp;</p> <p> A total of 45 teams, representing 93 schools, entered the competition, but it was the team from the National Capital Region, which included Combemale (DC&rsquo;15, MSPPM&rsquo;16). As part of the accelerated program, Combemale is also completing his bachelor&rsquo;s degree in ethics, history and public policy in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.</p> <p> The competition featured a simulation model which required students to apply the skills they have learned in the classroom, implement systems thinking and to showcase their leadership, critical thinking, and collaborative decision making skills. The simulation created a hypothetical mid-sized town in Middle America in need of health care solutions.</p> <p> Combemale and his team, which included Nomzana Augustin (Johns Hopkins University), Zachary Blackburn (University of Virginia), and Mark Rucci (University of Delaware), showed exemplary understanding of health care challenges and current policy concerns, as well as a display of sophisticated reasoning to craft composite and easy-to-implement policies that benefit health care for the long-term.</p> <p> &ldquo;Throughout the entire challenge we came back to the issue of funding,&rdquo; said Combemale about the 4-phase challenge.&nbsp; &ldquo;In the simulation, we were tasked with improving productivity and increasing the quality, access, cost and supply of health care and every time we looked at our initiatives we found that funding was the main limiting factor.&rdquo;</p> <p> Addressing the problem of how to pay for their initiatives was one of the major factors leading to the team&rsquo;s success.&nbsp; They switched their focus to programs that led to cost savings, such as preventative care, and used those savings to pay for more initiatives.</p> <p> &ldquo;It really was this layering of initiatives that helped us succeed,&rdquo; added Combemale.</p> <p> <img align="" alt="NASPAA_Group" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6689" style="width: 30%; margin: 10px; float: left;" />Combemale highlighted the varying skill sets of the people on his team, which led to quick and thoughtful solutions to the problems presented in the challenge.</p> <p> &ldquo;Everyone&rsquo;s skills and their passion for the subject matter was really wonderful,&rdquo; said Combemale. &ldquo;We all brought something unique to the table, discussed every plan, and our high level of cooperation made sure everyone was well versed in the decisions we made&rdquo;</p> <p> Combemale added that the skills he brought to the challenge were very much influenced by his education at Carnegie Mellon University.</p> <p> &ldquo;As a Heinz College student, I really do have an appreciation for numbers and quantitative reasoning,&rdquo; said Combemale.&nbsp; &ldquo;That background is what helped lead to the insight about our reinvestment plan.</p> <p> &ldquo;At CMU, I&rsquo;ve had the opportunity to take a great selection of courses in diverse fields that has enabled me to see how phenomena interact with each other.&rdquo;</p> <p> According to officials at NASPAA, &ldquo;the team understood the technical model, but instead of trying to obtain the highest score on the model, they aligned their thought process with stakeholder concerns and the current policy environment to affect actual change.</p> <p> &ldquo;They made sophisticated tradeoffs that would allow their policies to be organizationally and politically feasible.&rdquo;</p> <p> The team arrived at a solution that, if scaled to a national level, would save the U.S. $229 billion dollars annually in 2040 for a cumulative savings of $3.25 trillion U.S. dollars between 2015 and 2040. In addition, the team&#39;s solution yielded $930 million U.S. dollars in increased productivity in the economy due to fewer sick days taken.&nbsp; All of this took place while the population became healthier: death rates dropped by 12.7 percent, emergency room visits dropped by 19.4 percent and high risk behaviors such as obesity, smoking and drug abuse dropped by 18.7 percent in the simulated scenario.</p> <p> However, Combemale wasn&rsquo;t the only Carnegie Mellon University representative at the competition.&nbsp; Tamara Alkhattar, a Master of Public Management student (MPM &rsquo;17), was a member of the winning Northeast Region team in the Regional Competition.</p> <p> NASPAA is the global standard in public service education with a twofold mission to ensure excellence in education and training for public service and to promote the ideal of public service. It is the membership organization of graduate education programs in public policy, public affairs, public administration, and public and nonprofit management. NASPAA is also the recognized accreditor of master&#39;s degree programs in these fields. Its nearly 300 members are located across the U.S. and in 14 countries around the globe.</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=28" target="">More info about the MSPPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1771Mon, 17 Mar 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6688photo

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Lowell Taylor Co-Authors Article on The Impact of the Great Migration on the Mortality of African Americanshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1770]]><p> <em>&ldquo;It occurred to me that no matter where I lived, geography could not save me.&rdquo;<br /> ― Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America&#39;s Great Migration</em></p> <p> The Great Migration, the massive migration of African Americans out of the rural South to largely urban locations in the North, Midwest, and West that started in the early twentieth century, was a landmark event in US history.&nbsp; The Great Migration was one of the most rapid mass movements in history, as millions of African Americans headed out of the South in order to find better opportunities and a better life.</p> <p> However, a new paper co-authored by Heinz College&rsquo;s Lowell Taylor, shows that the Great Migration actually led to an increase in the mortality of African Americans born in the early twentieth century South. The paper makes this inference through analysis that uses proximity of birthplace to railroad lines as an instrument for migration.</p> <p> Taylor&rsquo;s paper, &ldquo;The Impact of the Great Migration on Mortality of African Americans: Evidence from the Deep South,&rdquo; published this month in the <em>American Economic Review</em>, found an alarming jump in mortality rates for African Americans who headed north.&nbsp; The authors believe they are the first to discover this link between the Great Migration and increased mortality.</p> <p> &ldquo;We started to think about the lifetime consequences of heading north, and how to measure them,&rdquo; said Taylor.&nbsp; &ldquo;Our goal was to provide a credible answer to the question: &lsquo;What would have happened if you hadn&rsquo;t moved north?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p> One of the challenges facing Taylor and his co-authors was the fact that migrating North was something individuals chose to do, and those who made that choice might have been systematically different than those who remained in the South.</p> <p> &ldquo;Fortunately, the historical experience provided us with a sort of natural experiment,&rdquo; continued Taylor. &ldquo;We were able to find two groups of people who were roughly identical, one group that migrated and one that did not.&nbsp; The innovative idea was use the location of railways in the early 20<sup>th</sup> Century as the factor that essentially randomized people into the two groups.&nbsp; African Americans who were born in railway towns were much more likely to migrate than those who were not.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s like the railways formed the experiment for our paper.&rdquo;</p> <p> Using this unique analysis of African Americans who moved north as a consequence of being born near a railway versus African Americans who did not, the team was able to find fascinating insights about the economic and health outcomes of migrants for the paper.</p> <p> &ldquo;Health outcomes are really one of the primary indicators of lifetime well-being,&rdquo; said Taylor.&nbsp;</p> <p> &quot;We thought what we would find was that migration north extended life and made the African-American population healthier,&quot; said Seth Sanders, a Duke University economist and one of the study&#39;s co-authors. &quot;We actually found exactly the opposite. Urban life is stressful. Being away from your roots is probably stressful.&quot;</p> <p> The economic and historical literature about the Great Migration, which absolutely was a means for improving economic opportunities among African Americans, also emphasizes that African Americans often faced daunting circumstances in the North, including, according to the paper, &ldquo;high costs in discriminatory housing markets and uneven employment prospects.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;Real economic gains to moving North may have been modest or non-existent for many African Americans, thus attenuating improved health prospects associated with increasing prosperity.&rdquo;</p> <p> In other words, the health benefits of economic and social improvement were outweighed by other longevity damaging factors, such as an increase in smoking and alcohol consumption, which then led to large increases in cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, and cirrhosis.</p> <p> The damage was so great that mortality rates for migrants had a 40% increase for African American men and a 50% increase for African American women.</p> <p> The paper&rsquo;s findings suggest a new layer of complication for the vast literature that evaluates links between health and location, education, income, and race, in the United States. The authors also believe that their research may be relevant for evaluating current trends in developing countries, many of which are experiencing extraordinary levels of migration from rural areas to urban centers.</p> <p> The authors&rsquo; assessment of the long-term consequences of the Great Migration suggests that dislocation due to migration might have substantial costs in terms of individual health.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.20120642" target="_blank">Read the Article on the American Economic Review &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1770Mon, 12 Mar 2015 10:07:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6715photo

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Heinz Alumnus Drives Policy with Arts and Educationhttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1765]]><p> The primary goal of any policy leader is to bring about effective and lasting change.&nbsp; However, the engine that drives that change is unique depending on the leader and the challenges they face.&nbsp; For Andres-Webster Henestrosa, a Master of Arts Management (MAM &rsquo;97) and a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management Alumnus (MSPPM &rsquo;97), the engine of change was not hard to find.</p> <p> As the Cultural Attach&eacute; for the Consulate of Mexico in Los Angeles, Webster-Henestrosa uses education and the arts of his culture to drive policy.</p> <p> Webster-Henestrosa&rsquo;s path is an intriguing one as he went from graduate school at Heinz College to working in a consulate in the second-largest city in the US.&nbsp; After getting his MAM and MSPPM degrees from Heinz College, he went back to Mexico and worked as an analyst in the Economic and Social Studies Department of Banamex, one of the most important financial groups in Mexico, now held by Citigroup.</p> <p> Soon, Webster-Henestrosa&rsquo;s policy education was put to work when he was named the Deputy Secretary of Culture of the State of Oaxaca, which then led to his promotion to Secretary of Culture of the State in 2007.</p> <p> Now as Cultural Attach&eacute;, Andres has the opportunity to work directly with the over three million members of the Mexican-American community in Los Angeles as part of his day-to-day responsibilities.</p> <p> Los Angeles has the highest concentration of Mexicans in the US, and after Mexico City is the largest concentration of Mexicans in the world. &nbsp;Webster-Henestrosa&rsquo;s job is to help facilitate relationships between them and their culture of origin.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s fortunate because this generation is interested in understanding their origins and culture,&rdquo; said Henestrosa.&nbsp; &ldquo;We need to help provide them with more opportunities, particularly in the field of education.&rdquo;</p> <p> <img align="" alt="andres_henestrosa_1" class="left" src="image.aspx?id=6651" style="margin: 10px; float: left; width: 35%;" />Education is one of the big staples of Andres&acute; work in Los Angeles.&nbsp; One of the most important programs he is working on is the Forum of Higher Education, Innovation, and Research.</p> <p> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s basically an agreement between the US and Mexico where we can create more opportunities for Mexicans to take part in some form of higher education in the United States,&rdquo; added Webster-Henestrosa.</p> <p> &ldquo;The strong relationship Mexico and the United States have in the economic level is not reflected in terms of the educational level. If we have a partnership, if we share a market and want to build a knowledge region and economy, then we need to understand more each other, ant that is just possible fostering the academic and educational exchange between both countries. So we have to build more opportunities for Mexicans to study here&rdquo;.</p> <p> The native arts of Mexican culture also play a big role in the policy work of Andres. From promoting activities similar to ones still taking place in Mexico to encouraging more arts education, Andres sees the effectiveness that the arts can have in sustaining a community.</p> <p> &quot;Culture is the expression of what it is to be human,&rdquo; said Henestrosa.&nbsp; &ldquo;The challenge is how to take advantage of arts and culture &nbsp;and make them function for the well being of society.</p> <p> &ldquo;My experience as Secretary of Culture of the state in Oaxaca helped me to understand that developing appropriate policies to arts and culture is very helpful for the community,&rdquo; continued Webster-Henestrosa. &ldquo;On the one hand they can increase the economy and favor the labor market, but on the other hand they foster a better understanding among people, becoming a better society.</p> <p> &ldquo;So those policies have to be developed in a rational manner, with methodologies and skills, like the ones I received in the MAM program.&rdquo;</p> <p> Andres credits the time he spent in Heinz College as one of the biggest factors for preparing him for where he is today.</p> <p> &ldquo;Those three happy years are unforgettable to me,&rdquo; said Andres.&nbsp; &ldquo;I encountered many excellent friends, mentors and professors and I still use the analytical, computational, and language skills I learned there every single day. I think Heinz has a clear, defined program for managers and, in my case policy makers, to have a very structured methodologies based in quantitative tools and deep analyses.</p> <p> &ldquo;Heinz is a very challenging school and what I learned and experienced there have helped definitely in my career.&rdquo;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=188" target="">More info on the Masters of Arts Management Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1765Mon, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6716photo

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General David Fridovich Talkshttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1768]]><p> <em>&ldquo;</em><em>No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.&rdquo;</em></p> <p> <em>- Andrew Carnegie</em></p> <p> Becoming an effective leader is one of the primary goals for anyone looking to create lasting change in their lives both personally and professionally. In order to provide insight on leadership, Carnegie Mellon University&rsquo;s H. John Heinz III College invited retired Lieutenant General and Green Beret David P. Fridovich to speak with students as part of Heinz College&rsquo;s ongoing Leadership Lecture Series.</p> <p> His talk focused on his path to becoming a 3-star General as well as how to build trust, loyalty, and confidence while staying true to oneself as a leader. Fridovich was the senior Green Beret as well as Deputy Commander of the U.S. Military&#39;s Special Operations Command when he retired on November 14, 2011 after more than 37 years of service in the U.S. Army.</p> <p> <img alt="GenSpeaking" src="image.aspx?id=6601&amp;width=300&amp;height=200" style="float: left; width: 300px; height: 200px; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;If you&rsquo;ve got a sense of values that you deeply believe in, you have to act on them,&rdquo; said Fridovich to a packed auditorium.&nbsp; &ldquo;This is the time as a graduate or undergraduate to get into what is important to you because that is going to be tested as you go out there.</p> <p> &ldquo;The set of core values that you bring are the ones that are going to guide you.&rdquo;</p> <p> Fridovich elaborated where his leadership principles come from through professional and personal anecdotes and took the time to answer questions from Heinz students.&nbsp; With a focus on integrity, Fridovich emphasized that a leader needs to stay true to their principles; because once your integrity has been damaged &ldquo;you can never go back.&rdquo;</p> <p> He also added that he was excited to be talking to a room full of future policy leaders, since gaps in education are, according to Fridovich, one of the biggest problems facing America today.</p> <p> Ashwin Rajaram, a Master of Science in Information Security Policy Management (MSISPM &rsquo;15) student and a current member of the US Navy since 2010 was the driving force behind getting General Fridovich, who is also his mentor, to come speak at Heinz.</p> <p> &ldquo;Lieutenant General Fridovich epitomizes the leader who sets the tone of integrity at the top,&rdquo; said Rajaram about his mentor. &ldquo;His actions and words permeate throughout an organization and make all personnel feel proud to be part of that team.</p> <p> <img alt="GenStanding" src="image.aspx?id=6602&amp;width=200&amp;height=199" style="float: right; width: 200px; height: 199px; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> &ldquo;The greatest gift you can give someone is your time, and he has been more than generous with his,&rdquo; continued Rajaram.&nbsp; &ldquo;I am very grateful for his time and hope I am able to be a fraction as effective a leader as he is.&rdquo;</p> <p> Rajaram is also a member of the Veterans Association at Heinz College.&nbsp; The Veterans Association, which is proud to have a member of every branch of the military currently enrolled at Heinz College, is a non-partisan student-led veterans group that exists to support military veterans and to help our student veterans smoothly make the transition from military to civilian life while ensuring academic success.</p> <p> &ldquo;Working with students across various cultures is an important skill for today&rsquo;s leaders and Heinz is a great place to learn these skills,&rdquo; said Rajaram. &ldquo;The student veterans group is a great organization with students who are leaders who carry themselves with the highest levels of integrity and standard.</p> <p> &ldquo;We are fortunate to have a great group who perform exceptionally well in the classroom and work to give back to the local community.&rdquo;</p> <p> Heinz College has been named a Military Friendly School for 4 years running.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3393" target="">Watch General David Fridovich&rsquo;s Talk at Heinz College &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=96" target="">More information on the MSISPM Program &gt;&gt;</a></p> <p> <a href="retCmsId=3229" target="">More information about the Heinz College Veteran&rsquo;s Association &gt;&gt;</a></p> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/index.aspx?nid=1768Mon, 03 Mar 2015 08:57:00 GMThttp://www.heinz.cmu.edu/news/news-detail/image.aspx?id=6659photo

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